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"Spider Nets" or other Hand-Tied M1 nets . . .


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I've always enjoyed netted helmets, and the recent thread about the small-mesh nets was real interesting to me. Thought maybe we could generate some pictures and examples of Hand-Tied nets too.

 

Best regards,

Paul

 

Colonel Peter T. Wolfe, first commanding officer of the 275th Inf. Regiment, 70th Infantry Division, the "Trail Blazers". His spider-net helmet and painted liner were left with his 16 year old son, before he left the 275th to join the staff of General Leslie McNair, Chief of Army Ground Forces.

 

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1944 colorized picture of Colonel Wolfe, wearing Silver Star ribbon awarded for action with the 5th Division during WW1. - He enlisted as a private, entered combat as a Sergeant, and received a direct commission to Lt. while in France.

 

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Best regards,

Paul

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;)

Oregon 1944...Private Texin and Thompson.

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Great picture, Thiery !!

 

I grew up about 45 minutes from where they trained in the Willamette Valley, near Corvallis, Or. - In fact a friend, and one of our prominant forum members and contributors lives much closer now - RobinB.

 

Best regards,

Paul

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Hi

Is this net issue or unit made ?

I have never seen one for sale , but they are really special .

owen

 

Fortunately there are lots of photos surviving from the 70th Division, and though there are variations, most of the spider nets worn by the Trail Blazers during stateside training, and early into their ETO service, follow much the same pattern. It is my belief that they were all hand-tied on some unit level; and every time I find an old copy of the Trail Blazer magazine, I keep hoping to find some mention of them in an article. So far, no luck.

 

I've also seen pictures of very similar nets used by soldiers in other units, and a very few semi-spider-nets in circa 1942 USMC photos.

 

I keep thinking that someday for the heck of it, I'll try and tie one myself - not for resale !! - just to see how tough it is. But that project like many others, exists only in my steadily aging mind so far . . . :blink:

 

Best regards,

Paul

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I have a copy of TM 5-267 Camouflage published 1 October 1943. It has a section on making helmet nets. It states, "The soldier should make one as part of his training in individual concealment." It may be that many soldiers hand tied nets during basic training but that these tended not to be retained after deployment to the combat zones. It also states, "Twine, scrap cord, or salvage shrimp or twine nets are possible sources of helmet net materials... Twine net, however... is only useful only to secure garnising materials... Its mesh is too large to have texturing value."

 

The TM also states TM 5-268 has detailed instructions on making a net. Unfortunately, I don't have that one.

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I think this is the first picture of I seen showing these in use...interesting! :thumbsup:

 

A couple of years ago I remember a discussion ( on CSP 1903 forum ) about the canvas muzzle covers, in which several prominant posters were pretty adamant about them never seeing combat usage . . . despite some of us having heard otherwise directly from WW2 vet's. :think:

 

Once again, there's no substitute for good period photos :thumbsup:

 

Paul

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since they used hand made nets, seems like just about any type of netting they could get would have been used? including fishing nets, Im sure there would have been plenty of old fishing nets around in europe

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Eniwetok. Marines of the 22nd Regiment.

 

Fantastic photo of hand-tied and large mesh netted USMC helmets - not seen as frequently as US Army netted pots in the PTO in my experience, at least.

 

And look at the variety of visible weapons in this fire team; 2-Garands, a carbine, and a .45 - not to mention the .50 on the amtrac in the distance.

 

Wonder how many of these guys were able to make the walk back to the beach when it was over . . .

 

Best regards,

Paul

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