Jump to content

TTC / "Sustineo Alas"


Sabrejet
 Share

Recommended Posts

Pictured here are three examples of the Air Corps' Technical Training Command DUI...the motto translates as I sustain the wings. This was a widely issued DUI which was first approved of in 1929. The two on the left are an unmarked matched pair whilst that on the right was made by N.S. Meyer.

 

What struck me about the matched pair was the nature of their bizarrely shaped large pins, particularly when compared with the much more refined Meyer item with its standard pin and roller catch. In all my years of collecting US insignia I've never encountered this kind of pin before. I presume it's pre-war and dates from the 1930s? Has anyone out there seen such pins on other types of insignia?

 

post-8022-1263839056.jpg post-8022-1263839084.jpg

 

 

Sabrejet

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The DI's that you have photographed have to be the most common DI of the second world war and the variations of this DI never seem to end.

While it is possible that your pair of DI's with the odd pin are pre-World War II, my guess is that they are more likely of wartime manufacture. This guess is based on the fact that the need for these DI's exploded with the start of the war as the Army Air force was hard at work trying to train aviators both officer and enlisted. As a result, the entities procuring these DI's had to go off the beaten path so to speak in order to acquire sufficient quantities to sate the need for the insignia.

It might be interesting for others to add variations of this DI as it would make for an interesting study of variations.

Allan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Though technically the Latin motto translates as I sustain the wings...it was sort of a pun for the phrase "Keep'em Flying".

 

Nice collection.

 

Cheers,

 

-D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pictured here are three examples of the Air Corps' Technical Training Command DUI...the motto translates as I sustain the wings. This was a widely issued DUI which was first approved of in 1929. The two on the left are an unmarked matched pair whilst that on the right was made by N.S. Meyer.

 

What struck me about the matched pair was the nature of their bizarrely shaped large pins, particularly when compared with the much more refined Meyer item with its standard pin and roller catch. In all my years of collecting US insignia I've never encountered this kind of pin before. I presume it's pre-war and dates from the 1930s? Has anyone out there seen such pins on other types of insignia?

 

post-8022-1263839056.jpg post-8022-1263839084.jpg

Sabrejet

 

I have a AAFTS Instructor badge made in plastic, maker marked WHITEHEAD. HOAG with the same pin.

Graham.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

post-4927-1264264918.jpgpost-4927-1264264959.jpg

 

Just rememberd this, its been in my 'not sure tin' for ages. Same pin, bar looks to be plated brass, badge is plated over a dark metal ??? I posted this once before, Bit of an inconclusive [ we prefer sterling] responce last time. I'm leaning towards 'good' based on the pin.

 

Graham

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have several of these as well. Below are a couple that I could put my hands on quickly. Two are plastic pinback, two are brass screwback and one is brass pinback. All are marked Gemsco.

 

post-1107-1264459033.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

Hello SJ!

 

I hope you're doing well.

 

Just saw your post from nearly 3 years ago. I'd like to know the maker that used this distinctive pin assembly too. I have 2 or 3 of the technician badges and this metal AAFTS badge. All are un-hallmarked.

 

As with most of my posted pics...please pardon the cat hair, the scanner just seems to attract it :D

 

Best wishes to you,

 

Joe

 

post-48324-0-79409000-1384643474.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jmar. Those pins are very distinctive aren't they, so there must be a manufacturing link? Alas, I never did find out who the maker was. However, now that this thread has been revived, someone out there might have the answer?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.