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M17 Elbow Telescope


Guest fmueller

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Guest fmueller

Hi All,

 

I just bought an M17 elbow telescope via eBay. This is the first piece of militaria I own and - truth be told - I bought it for the kid's play fort. It was cheaper than the plastic telescopes they usually sell for these purposes, and seems way better quality - both in optics as in built quality. It also piqued my interest in militaria, and I'd love to find out a little more about it. For example, was it used by itself or as part of a larger piece of equipment, such as a tank? Also, what were the built in color filters (red and amber) used for?

 

Many thanks for any information

 

Frank

 

PS: on the side it reads: Telescope, elbow, M17, No. 38086, A.B.Q., 111, 1943.

 

M17.JPG

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Hi All,

 

I just bought an M17 elbow telescope via eBay. This is the first piece of militaria I own and - truth be told - I bought it for the kid's play fort. It was cheaper than the plastic telescopes they usually sell for these purposes, and seems way better quality - both in optics as in built quality. It also piqued my interest in militaria, and I'd love to find out a little more about it. For example, was it used by itself or as part of a larger piece of equipment, such as a tank? Also, what were the built in color filters (red and amber) used for?

 

Many thanks for any information

 

Frank

 

PS: on the side it reads: Telescope, elbow, M17, No. 38086, A.B.Q., 111, 1943.

 

M17.JPG

 

you're joking right? pls. do NOT let kiddos "play" with this; it's for adult collectors and museum folk.

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Guest fmueller
you're joking right? pls. do NOT let kiddos "play" with this; it's for adult collectors and museum folk.

 

Well, I dare say the collectible value of this particular piece of equipment is pretty low, since a previous owner seems to have taken an angle grinder to the base and cut pieces off on both sides.

 

Other than that, I guess there are two fundamentally different views on how to deal with vintage gear. I used to collect vintage cameras and it's probably no different there than with militaria. Some people would like to preserve the stuff in mint condition preferably in a temperature and humidity controlled environment where nobody ever lays an eye on it again. Others think the stuff is wasted if it's not taken out into the field on a regular basis and used for whatever it was intended for. I guess I am leaning toward the latter view, and if my kids get some fun out of

this scope, it's probably the best use this thing can ever find, but of course that's just my personal opinion.

 

Frank

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I'd say put it in the fort and let the kids have a ball. I can't tell you what it was used for, tho.

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif
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After having a double bypass this past year, it's time to downsize and pass along much of my 'stuff'. I've had my fun, now it is someone elses turn.

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Guest fmueller

Many thanks for the info - especially to Carl! Still wondering what the color filters are good for and also why they would go through the trouble of making it an elbow telescope, not just a regular telescope. Does anybody know which artillery pieces the M17 was used with? Maybe that would allow me to dig up some more info.

 

FWIW, there is currently an elbow telescope on eBay (Item number: 120132551771) that still has the corresponding base, which would be very handy for my purposes. Unfortunately it's optics seem dirty and I couldn't use my scope with the base because it is missing parts of the mounting plate. I'll probably give it a miss, but I have to be careful that the militaria collecting bug doesn't bite me. This kind of optical equipment is very cool!

 

Frank

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Here's the view trough the different lens filters

 

Onbekendoptiek001.jpg

 

Onbekendoptiek002.jpg

 

Onbekendoptiek003.jpg

 

I think they are just meant to be used depending on the weather? light? situation.

There was also a USN variant which came in Navy grey.

 

The cover is a bit harder to find, but not impossible.

 

Best regards

Carl

ALWAYS LOOKING FOR 106TH INFANTRY DIVISION ITEMS!!

My website http://106thinfantry.webs.com

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Guest fmueller

Carl,

 

Your scope is obviously in a lot better shape than mine, which in addition to missing parts of the mounting plate, is also missing the rubber eye piece. There was a cover by itself on eBay the other day, but I managed to resist the temptation.

 

It is not obvious to me under which circumstances a red or amber filter would give you a better view than just clear glass. In photography color filters are mostly used to create special effects on B&W film, but by their very nature color filters block some light, which I would have thought to be undesirable for a gun sight - unless maybe you were shooting right into the sun. Two different color filters in a telescope still are a mystery to me, so curious if anybody else might have some insights. I wonder if there would have been a manual for this thing which might tell you when the filters were supposed to be used.

 

Frank

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