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Lets see some US NAVY Good Conduct Medals !!


KASTAUFFER
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  • 5 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
BeansEnHay

37F2F124-F192-4B4C-AC71-EFD4FF732237.jpeg.2af32a181a900a7c03b51afce4cf3143.jpegHey,

I recently picked up this GCM. I found the name interesting, Extra Edwin Rothmiller.  I didn’t think there would be another. I think Extra is possibly an anglicized version of a German surname or forename.  You can see the date of the award, 19 Oct 1925, and I found his original enlistment date, 01 Feb 1918.  A question came to me when I removed the single clasp “West Virginia”.  It is dated 15 Aug 1927.  Since his last enlistment ended Oct ‘25, did he have time to complete another hitch ?  If you extended for a defined period, say 22 months could you earn a clasp ?  I don’t know the exact date he left the Navy, but he was a civilian by 1928.  Also the C.S.C. # is 37958.  His original entry being Feb 1918.  I have another GCM to a Feb 1914 enlisted whose # is 48387.  I’m thinking this is not Rothmiller’s clasp.  What do you think ?

p.s. his rank was Fireman

D28AB6B3-611A-4DB4-84C2-E5B3B05010DA.jpeg

 

 

 

36CB4CC2-07B1-4CD4-851F-AB24D14ED2A9.jpeg

359E8275-1632-4B5F-9C83-EFBE6C7103B6.jpeg

A32EBD3A-07E6-4114-90EC-7308B0678462.jpeg

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BeansEnHay

I left something out, his original wartime enlistment 01 Feb 1918 ended in Apr 1919.  He got out for a number of months and then re entered the service.

Rob

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37F2F124-F192-4B4C-AC71-EFD4FF732237.jpeg.2af32a181a900a7c03b51afce4cf3143.jpegHey,
I recently picked up this GCM. I found the name interesting, Extra Edwin Rothmiller.  I didn’t think there would be another. I think Extra is possibly an anglicized version of a German surname or forename.  You can see the date of the award, 19 Oct 1925, and I found his original enlistment date, 01 Feb 1918.  A question came to me when I removed the single clasp “West Virginia”.  It is dated 15 Aug 1927.  Since his last enlistment ended Oct ‘25, did he have time to complete another hitch ?  If you extended for a defined period, say 22 months could you earn a clasp ?  I don’t know the exact date he left the Navy, but he was a civilian by 1928.  Also the C.S.C. # is 37958.  His original entry being Feb 1918.  I have another GCM to a Feb 1914 enlisted whose # is 48387.  I’m thinking this is not Rothmiller’s clasp.  What do you think ?
p.s. his rank was Fireman
D28AB6B3-611A-4DB4-84C2-E5B3B05010DA.jpeg.870ed7b54ca570f0374ed8833711d79d.jpeg
 
 
 
36CB4CC2-07B1-4CD4-851F-AB24D14ED2A9.jpeg.95c101c1051ccadeffd47097f712e189.jpeg
359E8275-1632-4B5F-9C83-EFBE6C7103B6.jpeg.7a7f5cdf1ba6cd14305625898222cdf4.jpeg
A32EBD3A-07E6-4114-90EC-7308B0678462.jpeg.65d2a7c138e2184adea384523a6e22cf.jpeg

Personally I suspect that it’s not his, I do not have that number recorded so I cannot confirm or deny it. Whenever The archives open, sending for his file could help answer the question as it should be noted in his records.


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Scarecrow

A little late to the party and although not the actual medal thought others might like to see this ribbon rack with 5 USN Good Conduct Awards.  This belonged to Edward R. Morris.  Morris enlisted in the Navy in October 1921 and retired in April 1953.  Rising from the rank of ordinary seaman to Lt. Commander at retirement.  In what was most likely one of his USN service defining moments Morris was a one of the survivors of the February 12, 1935 crash of the Airship USS Macon.

IMG_5747.jpg.0a8e42f9e0d62829401fda92cb6ac54f.jpgIMG_5746.jpg.5fb24e41444077e9444f1c69efedfb69.jpg

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aerialbridge

Here's LCDR Morris's Good Conduct group and a post I did several years ago on him, including a newsreel clip of him and other survivors getting off a bus at NAS Sunnyvale (CA)  after their rescue. 

 

 

morris medals.jpg

Edward Morris2.jpg

morris medals 3.jpg

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aerialbridge

ACMM (Aviation Chief Machinist Mate) "Chick" Solar, SC1c  (Ship's Cook, first class) Bill Herndon (kneeling), and AMM1c  Ed Ross Morris on Port Catwalk of USS Macon (ZRS-5) circa 1933-1935.  Solar enlisted in the Navy on March 29, 1917 and served 31 years, retiring on January 1, 1948. He was a Pearl Harbor survivor and also survived the crashes of the first and last of the Navy's four dirigible airships, USS Shenandoah (ZR-1) on September 4, 1925 and USS Macon (ZR-5) on February 12, 1935.  Morris and Solar both lived long enough to see the wreckage of USS Macon located and filmed by an underwater exploration team a few months before their deaths in 1990 at ripe old ages.

 

Ed Morris on USS Macon.jpg

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Reforger

Nice medals and pictures. Great to see some new GCMs on this thread. By the way, I don‘t think the name „Extra“ has a German origin. Can‘t think of any German name that would sound similar in any way. His parents probably just wanted a unique name for him.

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KASTAUFFER

Thank you for posting the group to LCDR Morris.  Very historic grouping!

 

Kurt

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  • 1 month later...
JustinH

Latest good cookie.  While, unnamed and the other medals incomplete, the ID tag is named to John Rodney Hendricks, a career Navy man.  Chief Torpedoman's Mate Hendricks enlisted in 1922 and was active until 1943 when he was moved into Fleet Reserve until retirement in 1953.  Of note, he was aboard the USS Hammann when it was sunk by Japanese torpedoes while trying to repair / salvage the USS Yorktown.  In the after action report he is listed as one of the men who, using the Hammann's gig, helped pick up survivors, including the Gunnery Officer who was hanging on lines from the Yorktown.     

Hendrick Medals.jpg

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Radioman 2nd class with Torpedo Squadron Eight, MIA at Midway in June, 1942. The newspaper article is from 1943 after his status was changed from MIA to KIA. Location of his Purple Heart and DFC are unknown.

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Casper_Star_Tribune_Thu__Mar_25__1943_sm.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
Reforger

Here is an interesting medal rack with a named Navy GCM awarded to a Hospital Corpsman. He served during WWII, Korea and Vietnam. He served with the 1st Marine Division in Korea from 1951 to 1952.

 

parkergcm.JPG.569a12a2c117a4eecf67eda026dd1d05.JPG

278197737_parker(4).jpg.cabc51aa2c09a630909576095ef36c88.jpg

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Kaigun Shosa

My most recent acquisition. A 6 bar NGCM to William M. Shoemaker.  CSC: 6408

Medal dated 7 Mar 1888 (USS Pensacola)

1st Bar: 7 Mar 1891 (USS Pensacola)

2nd Bar: 29 Jan 1894 (USS Ranger)

3rd Bar: 19 Apr 1897 (USS Montgomery)

4th Bar: 21 Apr1900 (USS Montgomery)

5th Bar: 6 Oct 1904 (USS Alabama)

6th Bar: 6 Oct 1908 (USS Franklin)

 

Since he was on the USS Montgomery during the Spanish American war, I'm assuming he is entitled to the 1898 West Indies campaign and a Sampson Medal? 

William Shoemaker 2a.jpg

William Shoemaker planchet.jpg

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aerialbridge

A six bar GCM from the 1940's is impressive, but that early one is tremendous.   I wonder if he rode horses.    If you don't mind, how'd you find such a medal?

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ASMIC2971

 

While I don't actively seek out medals, nor USN for that matter, I couldn't pass this photo up when I saw it.  Sadly, no name on on any of the three photos I have of this sailor.

IMG_7302.jpg

IMG_6634.jpg

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Kaigun Shosa
On 5/18/2021 at 1:57 AM, aerialbridge said:

A six bar GCM from the 1940's is impressive, but that early one is tremendous.   I wonder if he rode horses.    If you don't mind, how'd you find such a medal?

Hi Shawn,

I got it from a long time collector out on the east coast that I know. Hope to see  you at the next SOCALOMS meeting whenever we return to meeting in person.

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aerialbridge
On 5/20/2021 at 6:26 PM, ASMIC2971 said:

 

While I don't actively seek out medals, nor USN for that matter, I couldn't pass this photo up when I saw it.  Sadly, no name on on any of the three photos I have of this sailor.

 

Great photo of a Chief Quartermaster, prob. pre 1920 since no WWI Victory medal.

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aerialbridge
On 5/20/2021 at 9:32 PM, Kaigun Shosa said:

Hi Shawn,

I got it from a long time collector out on the east coast that I know. Hope to see  you at the next SOCALOMS meeting whenever we return to meeting in person.

 

Jimbo, forgot that was you-  how’ve you been?  Hopefully Rio Hondo will open up again sometime this summer so the meetings can resume.  I'm not much for Zoom calls.   If you're gonna be there, let me know, and then at least one other USN collector gonna be there.   Looking forward to the January annual "show" and buffet, assuming the 2020 plague hasn’t killed “buffets”.    I found a few things for you on Baltimore native William Marcellus Shoemaker (1840-1922) and your recent very early GCM addition. Ancestry shows an obit, so newspapers.com should have one.  Per his March 8, 1888 reenlistment rendez-vous at NY, NY,  when he got his first good conduct medal at age 48 after 12 years, he was 5’10” (tall for his day) and had red hair.  It references “CSC 6408 Pensacola Eng. Yeo.  March 7/88”.  Exactly what you'd want it to- nice when things match up.  Besides his USS Montgomery Sampson he very possibly had a Span Am Campaign since they were just starting to issue them the year before he retired in 1909 after 33 years…  at age 69!  Makes me feel young.   A medal like this well worth getting his service record from St. Louis whenever they reopen.   The article on Shoemaker’s retirement claims he served on only 5 ships over 36 years.   It mentions 4 of the ships on your bars, but instead of Franklin, it says Brooklyn.  Interesting coincidence- another Baltimorean who enlisted the month after Shoemaker, but as a 16-year-old apprentice, not a 36-year-old civil engineer, and retired in 1907 as a CPO after 30 years, also had a six-bar good conduct medal, whereabouts unknown.  He got it in 1883 and his CSC is in the low 3900s.  He was on 33 different ships, including receiving stations-- basically the closest thing to a shore station in 30 years were old Civil War era USNA training ships.   I have the “other” medal, so the opposite situation as yours.   These two old salts probably knew each other in Baltimore, local USWV,  fraternal orgs, etc.  Interesting that Shoemaker's father laid down the Baltimore street car lines,  my sailor's father ran a bar- important civic contributions, both.   ;-)   Neither ever married, but had several surviving siblings.  When I see really old, split groups like these,  pure speculation, but I figure they divided the medals and other stuff up between kin.  Shoemaker’s last duty was the Baltimore recruiting station and sailors from there were the honor guard for my sailor’s funeral in Baltimore several years later per his service file that I had copied in living color by Geoff at Golden Arrow.   Who says you don't buy the medal for the story, if the "story" is verifiable service history.

 

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/146268515/william-marcellus-shoemaker

 

shoemaker.jpg

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aerialbridge

Articles referencing Willie Shoemaker's Span Am service on USS Montgomery and retirement.  Guess nobody here got the horse-riding reference from post #219.

 

 

shoemaker span am.jpg

shoemaker retired.jpg

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