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Spotting the difference in foreign made M1s vs USGI

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Hello all, here is a guide to help you in spotting foreign made M1 helmets versus actual US manufacture ones.

 

First up, is a Danish model of the M1. I will start with the liner. From the outside, it sort of looks like a US made, with the insignia hole, but it is easily spottable by looking at the lack of a nape strap, the color of the webbing, the color of the liner, and the thickness of it.

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In the inside of the shell (all rear seamed), there is a very noticable mark.

 

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Note that the chinstraps are attached with metal clips. They have approximately the same size hardware as the Korea and later ones, but they are missing the ball that secures it in. The part with the pronged end is longer, and has a adjustor. The one with the receiving end is shorter and doesn't adjust.

 

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Next are the French made M51 and M55 variants. This one is a M55. The shell and liner are very symmetrical, and the inside of the shell and liner are marked Paris and the year they were made. The earlier ones had a resin liner similar to the WWII US ones, but these ones are plastic. Do not let the cork finish, color and sewn on chinstraps fool you.

 

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And I THINK this is a Norwegian model. It is scarily similar to the WWII and Korea, Early VN liners and I was fooled by it. Fortunately, it was only $25, so I learned my lesson and am passing it on to you guys.

 

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This is a liner made in the 80s. It is US, but not WWII, Korea, or Vietnam. In case the pictures are hard to see, the webbing is attached to the liner by six snaps. The color of the material of the liner varied throughout the several years it was made.

 

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Next is a Korean War era M1 helmet liner. It is similar in many aspects to WWII liners, but the color of the webbing is a darker OD7 in comparison to the light OD3 of WWII liners. The liner chinstrap is a copy of a WWII strap that is a replacement, and not original to the liner.

 

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The straps on this late WWII Schlueter rear seam helmet are a OD7. They are bartacked to the shell, and have the same hardware as the OD3 types used throughout the war.

 

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Now, to round this all off and give you a glimpse of WWII helmets, this is a fixed bail helmet from WWII. It has OD3 chinstraps, and a 100% WWII liner. For those who do not know what a "bail" is, poke around the great reference here and the helmets section. In a nutshell, early WWII = front seam, fix bail, mid WWII = front seam, swivel bail, late WWII and beyond = rear seam fixed bail.

 

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Now, to round this all off and give you a glimpse of WWII helmets, this is a fixed bail helmet from WWII. It has OD3 chinstraps, and a 100% WWII liner. For those who do not know what a "bail" is, poke around the great reference here and the helmets section. In a nutshell, early WWII = front seam, fix bail, mid WWII = front seam, swivel bail, late WWII and beyond = rear seam fixed bail.

 

post-4251-1261188695.jpg

 

FUBAR - rear seam swivel bail*


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I would say its a Firestone overstamp.US made.

 

Has the added webbing for the chin cup.

 

Parachutists model.Post WW2


In Memoriam:
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Might be a field made Rigger if the A webbings are not under the original webbing and another rivet was added, Yes I agree with Firestone over stamp but check the rivets for an added one!!

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And I THINK this is a Norwegian model. It is scarily similar to the WWII and Korea, Early VN liners and I was fooled by it. Fortunately, it was only $25, so I learned my lesson and am passing it on to you guys.

 

attachicon.gif CIMG1045.JPG

This is a Danish M48 OTAN (liner for sure) first type, while first images you posted are from a second type. Sometimes, in first type liners, you can get hardware like sweat band, nape strap from US WW2 (mine has a nape strap with united carr rivets).

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In the inside of the shell (all rear seamed), there is a very noticable mark.

 

attachicon.gifCIMG1039.JPG

 

Note that the chinstraps are attached with metal clips. They have approximately the same size hardware as the Korea and later ones, but they are missing the ball that secures it in. The part with the pronged end is longer, and has a adjustor. The one with the receiving end is shorter and doesn't adjust.

 

attachicon.gifCIMG1040.JPG

 

That mark CF stands for Civil Defense and there helmets were grey (army helmets were green)

 


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