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Cobrahistorian
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Cobrahistorian

What?! What else did you expect?

 

My main collecting focus is Close Air Support of troops on the ground. During WWII, the P-47s of the 9th Air Force defined the mission and created new and innovative tactics that are still in use today. Here's some shots of my 9th AF Jug collection. I'm now working on the uniforms to go along with the photos!

 

Jon

 

P-47D394thFSEschbornGermany1945LtCo.jpg

P-47DCaptainJohnLund394thFSEschborn.jpg

P-47D-30391stFS.jpg

P-47D-3044-3323391stFS.jpg

P-47D-3044-332854W-L.jpg

P-47D-5LeakyJoeC2-Q368thFG396thFSLT.jpg

P-47Ds390thFS.jpg

P-47s366thFG001.jpg

P-47s366thFG.jpg

P-47s366thFG002.jpg

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Just stunning "jugs" Jon. Nothing says close air support like a pair of "jugs".

 

I always remember the P-51 pilot and the P-38 pilot arguing about how awesome their aircraft were and how fast and sleek etc. when a jug pilot walks in th ebar and says "oh yeah....well my airplane can fall out of the sky faster then yours, bounce, refuel rearm and go back to fight'in faster then your pretty boy fighter planes"

 

Well I always thought it was funny........

 

r - Dan

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What?! What else did you expect?

 

P-47s366thFG002.jpg

 

There is nothing better than seeing a picture of a line up of Jugs. :P

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Cobrahistorian
Nice! But not just the 9th Jon, the P-47's of the 12th AF did their fair share of innovating as well...

 

 

You're absolutely right Doug! The XII TAC did quite a bit as well. This is my only 12th AF P-47 shot. Jugs of the 86th Fighter Bomber Group.

 

P-47s12thAF.jpg

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My Dad was ops officer in the 514th/406th/9th in 1945. He was a 3xdfc, 20xam recipient with 3300 hours when he retired. He flew about every bird in the book, but the thunderbolt was his favorite. He passed away in 2004.

Photo is of one in his squadron.

 

post-8785-1260496902.jpg

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After the war and until his retirement at age 78, he worked in the industry, mostly in ECW, but for several years he worked for General Electric doing instrument layout. He designed the instrument panel for the X-15 and the B-70.

Photo is of the 1950's concept art of the B-70. He got mad at me once for taking it to school before it was declassified. Ooops.

 

post-8785-1260498079.jpg

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After the war and until his retirement at age 78, he worked in the industry, mostly in ECW, but for several years he worked for General Electric doing instrument layout. He designed the instrument panel for the X-15 and the B-70.

Photo is of the 1950's concept art of the B-70. He got mad at me once for taking it to school before it was declassified. Ooops.

 

post-8785-1260498079.jpg

 

 

That is an awesome story. LOL :thumbsup:

Thanks for sharing.

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Cobrahistorian

Just snagged this one off of ebay this afternoon. The original will be enroute to me shortly. This particular bird is quite interesting. It was assigned to the 313th FS of the 50th FG and flew in combat in the summer of 44. September 13th, it was being flown by Yellow Flight leader LT Emmett Wyttenbach on an airfield strafing mission near Hanau. According to the MACR, they took intense light flak and Lt Wyttenbach was hit in the engine and radio compartment, setting his bird on fire. He pulled up to 800ft AGL and bailed out, landing on top of a building in the nearby town, while the airplane crashed into the town itself. Wyttenbach was burned on his legs, but survived and was captured, spending the rest of the war in a POW camp. He survived the war and passed in 2001.

 

The image is actually reversed on the original photo, so I flipped the digital image and enhanced the contrast to bring out the detail. There does seem to be the outline of an individual aircraft letter that was either removed or has just been outlined and not painted yet, but I can't really tell what it is.

 

Can't wait to get it on the high-res scanner to see all the stuff behind it!

 

ebayjug.jpg

 

Apparently Wyttenbach stayed in after the war. The Rocky Mountain Military History Museum has his USAF uniform in their collection.

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316th FS 324th FG
Just snagged this one off of ebay this afternoon. The original will be enroute to me shortly. This particular bird is quite interesting. It was assigned to the 313th FS of the 50th FG and flew in combat in the summer of 44. September 13th, it was being flown by Yellow Flight leader LT Emmett Wyttenbach on an airfield strafing mission near Hanau. According to the MACR, they took intense light flak and Lt Wyttenbach was hit in the engine and radio compartment, setting his bird on fire. He pulled up to 800ft AGL and bailed out, landing on top of a building in the nearby town, while the airplane crashed into the town itself. Wyttenbach was burned on his legs, but survived and was captured, spending the rest of the war in a POW camp. He survived the war and passed in 2001.

 

The image is actually reversed on the original photo, so I flipped the digital image and enhanced the contrast to bring out the detail. There does seem to be the outline of an individual aircraft letter that was either removed or has just been outlined and not painted yet, but I can't really tell what it is.

 

Can't wait to get it on the high-res scanner to see all the stuff behind it!

 

ebayjug.jpg

 

Apparently Wyttenbach stayed in after the war. The Rocky Mountain Military History Museum has his USAF uniform in their collection.

 

Wondered who got that one. Sorry I made you pay a little bit more for it. If I'd known it was you I'd have gotten out of the way.

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Hello Jug lovers,

 

Do you know wartime article "How to fly the Thunderbolt"? If not, buy Flying monthly, April 1944 issue. There is such a beautiful material there for Jug lovers that all modern "Walk around" and similar ones look poor. The article shows all 32 operations needed to take-off by Jug. All of them are illustrated from pilot's point of view. 32 images show all pilot's operations -- from exterior check (op. No. 1) up to locking flight controls (No. 32).

 

Best regards

 

Greg

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Cobrahistorian
Wondered who got that one. Sorry I made you pay a little bit more for it. If I'd known it was you I'd have gotten out of the way.

 

See, now that's just another reason why I absolutely hate ebay. It used to be that if someone I knew was bidding on something, I stayed away from it. Had I known, I wouldn't have bid.

 

Sorry Doug!

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Hello Jug lovers,

 

Do you know wartime article "How to fly the Thunderbolt"? If not, buy Flying monthly, April 1944 issue. There is such a beautiful material there for Jug lovers that all modern "Walk around" and similar ones look poor. The article shows all 32 operations needed to take-off by Jug. All of them are illustrated from pilot's point of view. 32 images show all pilot's operations -- from exterior check (op. No. 1) up to locking flight controls (No. 32).

 

Best regards

 

Greg

 

I have the vhs how to fly the p-47 wartime aircorps film. Kinda hokey, but close up and personal.

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Cobrahistorian
post-8785-1260657978.jpg

 

513th jug and group gooney sporting stripes

 

Sweet! Great to see a real color shot of "Little Ann"! Which was your Dad's bird?

 

 

Jon

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