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I'd be very interested in hearing how you guys steam dents out of stocks. I've been using a wet cloth over the dent and a hot iron.

 

I do a lot of steaming without much results.

 

Does anyone have a better method?

 

Thanks

 

Paul

Salome, AZ

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I've had pretty good results by using a tea kettle with a 8" radiator hose attached to the spout. You just have to be careful with how you hold the stock to avoid a steam burn. Part of the results will depend on how bad a gouge you're trying to fix.

 

I think the hot iron/rag method is good for small dings.

 

Whatever technique you use, the key is to let it dry thoroughly (AT LEAST 24 hours, 48-72 would be better) before a light sanding.

 

Good luck!

Steve

I remember:

Chris Ingrassia (9/11) CPT Tristan Aitken (OIF, 2003)

MAJ Paul Syverson (OIF, 2004) CPT Tom Miller (OIF, 2005)

SSG Scottie Bright (OIF, 2005) CPT Chris Petty (OIF, 2006)

MAJ Hurley Shields (OIF, 2008)

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________


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I use the wet towel and hot iron approach and have had very good results. The iron has to be hot enought to create steam - that what lifts the dent.

Mark V

 

 

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"If they're not shooting at you, you're not trying hard enough. Now move out and draw fire!"

 

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Depends on the dent. A smashed area actually seems to lift fairly well, while in my experience a true 'dent' that is just compressed wood is a tough nut to crack. I got fairly good results with a steam iron and a cloth:

 

dent1.jpg

dent2.jpg

dent3.jpg

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I don't want to state the obvious, but the wood should be stripped of any laquer or varnish finish before trying to lift a dent with steam - the moisture has to be able to penetrate the wood. No intent to offend anyone but just want to make sure that we don't overlook a key step.

Mark V

 

 

382957612.jpg

 

"If they're not shooting at you, you're not trying hard enough. Now move out and draw fire!"

 

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Another option, if its a rough stock, is a soak (or two) in the tub. About a year ago I had a Inland carbine stock that was beat up and varnished! After I stripped it down, a couple soaks in the tub took out most everything (short of the actual breaks in wood fiber, which included the IO and P marks). Just make sure you clean the tub after, lest the missus be all :evilgrin:

I suppose this could be considered the extreme of dent steaming, but it worked very well on my rough stock...

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I don't want to state the obvious, but the wood should be stripped of any laquer or varnish finish before trying to lift a dent with steam - the moisture has to be able to penetrate the wood. No intent to offend anyone but just want to make sure that we don't overlook a key step.

 

Give that man a "ceegar" :thumbsup: . Actually, many don't realize the very important point you make and it's precisely because you have to remove an original finish to achieve the most effective dent/ding removal that I would never suggest doing it. IMHO you should leave the stock as it is, dents, dings, initials - if they are period they are all part of the rifle's provenance.

 

Then again, I'm a bit of a purist collector so consider the source.

 

Tim

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If it needs a re-finish, then the steaming isn't an issue. The key here is "needs", and that's not black and white. The stock in my photos for instance would not respond to cleaning- mild, moderate, or aggressive, and the color was 'arsenal red'...on the inside. It was black and dark chocolate on the outside, with that stuff not coming off until I was removing whatever original red finish there was

 

if the stock was USGI and had original cartouches, I would have went a different route. As it was USGI, ugly, ouchy, and only had scant rebuild cartouches. I rolled up my sleeves, protected the cartouches and went to town. And I left a lot of gouges and dings, and the dent removal was still 4 or 5 hours

 

The steam also can lighten the wood considerably. I had great results, YMMV

 

Here's my Dad's M1 carbine stock. I wiped it with denatured alcohol and odorless mineral spirits, let it dry in the sun for a few hours, and applied a single coat of BLO, bam, done. Total time 3 hours, so this is a good example of how acceptable results can be attained with little time invested- it's the same color as my M1 rifle stock that I spent oh...80 or so hours on :lol:

 

m1carbinestock.jpg

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