Jump to content

My long lost Army Distinguished Service Cross


Recommended Posts

IMPERIAL QUEST

Hi all,

I hope this is the right forum for this posting....

 

I know this is a long shot, but a few years back, I had to part with my most treasured item in my collection due to financial problems. Since then, I have wondered who is caring for it now. It was numbered 13598 (full wrap brooch) on the lower arm, in WWII case, w/ ribbon bar, and lapel pin. If you know of its whereabouts, please let me know. I really miss having this piece in my collection...so much so, that I memorized the number on it before I let it go. ermm.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
IMPERIAL QUEST

A follow up question, more general in nature. Is it possible to trace a numbered example in the 10,000 to 14,000 range with nothing more than the number?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
Anyone?

 

No.........There are no known recipient records for numbered crosses after the WWI era with a very few exceptions. No list exists and numbers are not known to have been recorded in a central location(but they have been - who knows?)

Semper Fi....Bobgee

Link to post
Share on other sites
IMPERIAL QUEST
No.........There are no known recipient records for numbered crosses after the WWI era with a very few exceptions. No list exists and numbers are not known to have been recorded in a central location(but they have been - who knows?)

Semper Fi....Bobgee

 

 

Thank you for the reply Bob, I appreciate it. So the numbers we encounter are just stock numbers stamped by the contractor for accounting purposes as with other decorations? I am surprised that the numbers were not recorded for the award of the second highest combat decoration:thumbdown: . The reason I say this, is that (as you know) PH's during WW II are traceable by number only up to a certain number range.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"So the numbers we encounter are just stock numbers stamped by the contractor for accounting purposes as with other decorations? I am surprised that the numbers were not recorded for the award of the second highest combat decoration:"

 

This is an erroneous assumption. The medals are numbered because the (Govt.) War Department wanted them numbered. It has nothing to do with contractor inventory. Apparently the task of keeping a record of the medals numbers became too onerous and it was discontinued and the numbering of medals ceased. There have been situations in research where Unit General Orders have been found with medal numbers, i.e. DFCs, PHs, AMs, SSMs entered by a diligent clerk in pen&ink on the order itself. Not a common occurrance.

Regards....Bobgee

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll disagree with Bob on this one. The numbering was not for the issuing agencies, but the logisticians, who had to ensure that each manufacturer was delivering the contracted goods. The G-1 guys, as good clerks, kept track of the numbers because they were there, at least until the numbers of awards got too large to deal with. The cessation of numbering of the medals was an economy step, probably pushed by the manufacturers -- it was another step in the process, so it cost another penny or two. Plus, if the medal number went away, the manufacturer could provide x number of medals, not specifically medals "10001" through "20000", i.e., a Purple Heart was a Purple Heart was a Purple Heart.

 

From the pencil-pusher's perspective, a numbered medal that had to be tracked was a pain. It meant that once a General Order was cut, one specific Purple Heart had to follow the paperwork until presented. Consider the problems that created -- a man wounded in North Africa might have a GO cut by his regiment; then he gets seriously wounded and is evacuated to Walter Reed Hospital. That medal now has to get sent back to Walter Reed, where it has to be accounted for, and presented to the right man. Without the medal number to consider, the GO has to be sent, and the folks at Walter Reed dip into their stock of a zillion Purple Hearts and the man gets a medal. No fuss, no muss.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I know Col. Gleim found some traceable WWII DSC numbers during his research, but they were all early WWII awards in the high 7XXX-9XXX range. I bet some more numbers have turned up since then, but I doubt they will be published. The people who have the numbers will use them to make DSC's they find more valuable .

 

Kurt

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Forum members:

 

You are in the MEDALS & DECORATIONS "Reference Section". This area is where posts from the general Medals & Decorations "discussion section" (http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...?showforum=83) are moved for permanent retention and education about the history of the various U.S. medals and military decorations.

 

As time moves forward, some of these posts may have additional information added to them by the moderators of this section. We ask for your input as well, especially in the correction of any erroneous information that may have inadvertently be posted..

 

We encourage further comments about this post and its content. In order to do so, you will need to start a new post in the general Medals & Decorations "discussion section" (here: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind....?showforum=83). And, as needed, we will be pleased to move any new and / or valued information that is derived from your post (and subsequent comments) into this reference area as its own standing post.

 

Please be advised: posting and / or editing is restricted on this post to moderator's and forum staff.

 

Sincerely,

Chris / ADMIN

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.