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post WWII, 50's & 60's US Air Force uniform photos


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Ed, if you have a chance to look at my book: Into the Blue on pages 205/206 there are photos of the comparative sizes of male and female officer's cap pieces. The interesting thing not usually pointed out is that the size of the female cap eagle is the same as the enlisted eagle with the surrounding circle missing. This is one of the reasons that the USAFUB (Uniform Board) felt that a smaller EM device was not needed. Also, as to attachment there are female devices with 2, 3 clutches and one with a jeweler's. The caption below is incorrect as it should be under the fourth photo. Opps, sorry guys.

 

Still trying to get volume 3 "fatigue Uniforms" but Schiffer's doesn't think there would be much of a market. I disagree and think it would be the best of the three for the market. Dave Shultz and I are looking at self publishing. Will, let you know when it happens.

 

Marry Christmas and a healthy (important to us old guys) New Year.

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From 1954. The photo caption reads: “Lake Charles Air Force Base, Lake Charles, La. ... Receiving congratulations and farewell, from Lieutenant Colonel Charles A. Martin, 44th Periodic Maintenance Squadron Commander at Lake Charles Air Force Base, are: Master Sergeant Albert G. Fenske (right) and Master Sergeant Floyd Barnhardt. The sergeants were honored at retirement ceremonies held last Saturday morning at Squadron Headquarters. Sergeant Barnhardt who served 26 years was presented with an engraved cigarette lighter while Sergeant Fenske who served 21 years received a desk pen set engraved in gold. Both sergeants were supervisors at the 44th Periodic Maintenance Squadron shops."

 

Note the Master Sergeant on the right only shows a single award of the Good Conduct Medal.

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Cookie: On page 212 of Into the Blue vol 1 it explains the evolution of the irrevently named "Farts and Darts." It is easy to see why the army and navy embellishment was call scrambled eggs due to the yellow color. When we separated from the army we did not have brim decoration. The army and navy added theirs and decided to decorate the Field and General Officer grade service caps. There was some positive aspects to this as it appeared to aid in the retention of Field Grade officers. The Air Force proposed a brim decoration in 1960 for Field Grade ranks of major and Lt. Col.s. The 5th Permanent Air Force Uniform Board (PAFUB) recommended 15 January 1960 that brim decorations include " the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and Majors as a prestige factor..." "...and added moral incentive in anticipation of possible loss of flying status as well as fewer promotions for many majors."

 

 

The Field Grade decoration would consist of two clouds and lighting bots on each side of the brim for field officers and three for General Officers. Theses decorations went into effect for Lt. Col.s but the majors would have to wait until the year 2000. At the same time it was decreed that the Chief Of Staff would have the Farts and Darts included around the hat brim. Now there was no precedent for these decorations in the US military. Whoa, you point to "Bug out Doug" and his flamboyant hat and you would be correct except his hat was of HIS design and was actually presented to him after he was retired and became the "Marshal of the Philippines!" There are some back stories that President (former captain of artillery) Truman mentioned to his staff and confidants about the "unauthorized" and blatant disregard for military regulation of "that dammed hat!"

 

 

The CoS encirclement of the sweat band embroidery was first authorized by CoS General Hoyt Vandenberg.

 

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From 1954. The photo caption reads: “Lake Charles Air Force Base, Lake Charles, La. ... Receiving congratulations and farewell, from Lieutenant Colonel Charles A. Martin, 44th Periodic Maintenance Squadron Commander at Lake Charles Air Force Base, are: Master Sergeant Albert G. Fenske (right) and Master Sergeant Floyd Barnhardt. The sergeants were honored at retirement ceremonies held last Saturday morning at Squadron Headquarters. Sergeant Barnhardt who served 26 years was presented with an engraved cigarette lighter while Sergeant Fenske who served 21 years received a desk pen set engraved in gold. Both sergeants were supervisors at the 44th Periodic Maintenance Squadron shops."

 

Note the Master Sergeant on the right only shows a single award of the Good Conduct Medal.

 

Not unusual, and for two reasons.

 

First, remember that during this era there was a very conservative feeling about awards and decorations across all military services and personnel recognition lacked a lot of emphasis on decorations.

 

The Good Conduct Medal, especially during this period, was still considered a personal decoration and the wearer had to be formally recommended by the headquarters squadron commander. The first Air Force Good Conduct Medal I received in 1980 was done exactly this way and I was shown the recommendation first sergeant. There were orders.

 

Second, it might have been a personal preference on the part of the NCO (I notice there aren't any devices on his other ribbons), or it could be the fact that he spend most of his career wearing utility uniforms or fatigues and may have only worn a dress uniform rarely.

 

The 44th Periodic Maintenance Squadron was part of the 44th Bombardment Wing. At this point, the 44th Bombardment Wing was converting from B-29s to B-47s as part of the Strategic Air Command and would begin Cold War Deployments to North Africa. Eventually, this base would be renamed in honor of Maj. Gen. Clair Chennault.

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Not unusual, and for two reasons.

 

First, remember that during this era there was a very conservative feeling about awards and decorations across all military services and personnel recognition lacked a lot of emphasis on decorations.

 

The Good Conduct Medal, especially during this period, was still considered a personal decoration and the wearer had to be formally recommended by the headquarters squadron commander. The first Air Force Good Conduct Medal I received in 1980 was done exactly this way and I was shown the recommendation first sergeant. There were orders.

 

Second, it might have been a personal preference on the part of the NCO (I notice there aren't any devices on his other ribbons), or it could be the fact that he spend most of his career wearing utility uniforms or fatigues and may have only worn a dress uniform rarely.

 

The 44th Periodic Maintenance Squadron was part of the 44th Bombardment Wing. At this point, the 44th Bombardment Wing was converting from B-29s to B-47s as part of the Strategic Air Command and would begin Cold War Deployments to North Africa. Eventually, this base would be renamed in honor of Maj. Gen. Clair Chennault.

 

On second thought, could the top ribbon be an Air Medal? The Army Good Conduct Medal is to the far left on the second row and contains a device.

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Adding to the previous post, the three officers in the back row are all wearing on their epaulets the DI of the 56th Fighter-Interceptor Wing. Question: When did the USAF phase out the wearing of DI's? PS. Lt. Lilley on the right shot is just back from Korea where he shot down 7 MiGs.

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would people wear ribbons, collar discs and plastic name tags on a USAF blue " Ike" like they would on a regular blue jacket?

 

In other words, is it possible to find blue Ike jackets "decorated" like the regular jacket below?

 

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From personal experience I can say the later blue on white plastic name tags were not worn on the Ike Jacket. Ribbons and name tags were optional. Some time after I arrived in Bermuda, we started wearing white on black name tags. Will check some pictures that may reveal additional information

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif



WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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This is far too good a thread to let die!!!

I think I have one stashed away somewhere, let me dig it out and I will post some pics.

Tom

"I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep: I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion".

 

Alexander

 

"Out of every one hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back."

 

Heraclitus

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This Colonel James F. Fisher, has quite a story hidden somewhere.

Hope that someone here can help.

This is just the ribbon bar, too ashamed to take a pic of the rest, as

I don't have a proper display.

Is the lower left Korean service? Don't have a clue on the other 2 on the

3rd bar.

All help will be as always appreciated.

Thanks,

Tom

"I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep: I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion".

 

Alexander

 

"Out of every one hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back."

 

Heraclitus

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Sorry,

Guess I should have attached the pics...been a while, but it's good to be back!!!post-105743-0-95528100-1567048867_thumb.jpg

"I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep: I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion".

 

Alexander

 

"Out of every one hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back."

 

Heraclitus

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