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Bob Hudson

post WWII, 50's & 60's US Air Force uniform photos

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The Master Sergeant is wearing the first style NATO Allied Air Forces Central Europe. The attached pictures show the two varieties of the badge. The type 1 badge depicts the flags of the seven member nations of AAFCE. Notice the Canadian Flag is the older type, replaced in 1965 by the current Canadian Flag. The type 2 badge shows the new Canadian Flag

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WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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Good Job Cookieman, that's it.

 

Now another question, who would in the U.S. Air Force would be wearing it? Staff of the USAF HQ in Europe? Photo by the way if you didn't know was taken in August 1953 at Orleans France, however this M/Sgt's exact unit wasn't mentioned.

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I think it is the Coast Guard Auxiliary Achievement award, but I have no idea what the device is.


***WANTED*** Uniforms to Pearl Harbor Survivors.

Wanted: USN uniforms to Pearl Harbor survivors & WWII sunk ship survivors. http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/264131-wanted-uniforms-to-pearl-harbor-and-sunk-ships-survivors/

 

WANTED - seriously interested in named Chief/Senior/Master TORPEDOMAN USN uniforms from the 1950s-1960s-1970s, and named USN jumpers or CPO coats from WWII. http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/321179-wanted-torpedoman-uniforms-named-1920s-1970s/

 

"All Torpedoes running Hot, Straight and Normal."

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I think it is the Coast Guard Auxiliary Achievement award, but I have no idea what the device is.

If the ribbons are original to the uniform, has anyone looked at National Guard awards to see if it's one? We know USCGAUX awards aren't authorized on AF uniforms though we don't know if this guy abided by & adhered to regs. It reminds me of a German award but I've not been able to find it. There're some German badges that have ribbons (unauthorized ribbons from what I understand) for as well as badges.


Be well,

 

Chad C. Rogers

Retired Army

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What's the red ribbon and it's device please?

 

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NY State Long & Faitful Service. Given out for every 5 years of service. This one has the obsolete round device with Roman numeral numbers, this one is XV (15) years.I think in the 80s the change the devices on all medals to a NYS shield, bronze(1) & silver(5).

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ASMIC #1098

 





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Here's a Airman from the early 50s, circa 1951 or 52, at least that's what I been told. His name is Barney DiMaio, the late brother of one of my neighbors who lent it to me to scan, I was noting the wear of the Khaki tie and belt still.

 

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A Airman in Vietnam wearin the 1st Pattern Tropicals with full color insignia in 1966.

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A 1950s stateside Airman, wearing the OD HBT coveralls again, with garrison cap and GI WWII era ankle boots, could be richly polished to seem dark Brown. or they may be Blackened???.

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I enlisted on 1 July 1955. Upon arriving at Sampson AFB NY, I was issued 3 sets of OD HBT hairingbone coveralls with 13 star metal buttons. They were called fatigues, not coveralls. We were also issued two pairs of broganS (not ankle boots). They were black and had to be spit shined at all times. A few guys in our flight who had smaller shoe sizes were issued brown rough suede brogans. These were dyed bkack, scraped and spit shined.


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WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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I should add I wore the one piece fatigues until about mid-1958, until I could afford to buy 2 piece fatigues in the BX.


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WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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In my book Into the Blue I related a story my uncle told me. In 1949 basic he was given a pair of brown brogans and a bottle of blk dye. "Her kid strip 'em down and dye 'em black." The new accoutrement color for the USAF was black. At least he didn't have to scrape them smooth. The advantage of big feet?

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Thanks guys about the boots info, as this refers to the brogans, did this apply to the high top combat boots that some AF personnel had to wear on occasion? you know those personnel who served in ground combat, combat support units along side the Army and maybe with Marines if needed, IE Forward Air people, Engineers etc. This would not so much the WWII buckle top boots worn in the early 50s/Korea period, but in particular the new M1947 boot.

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As an Air Policeman, starting in early 1956, we wore jump boots. These were the same as the Army Airborne Troops wore, except in black. They had a capped toe, and brand of choice was Cochoran.


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WANTED: U.S. MARKSMASHIP MEDALS AND BADGES AWARED FOR EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION

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As an Air Policeman, starting in early 1956, we wore jump boots. These were the same as the Army Airborne Troops wore, except in black. They had a capped toe, and brand of choice was Cochoran.

Did you dye them?

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I would imaging by the the mid 50's he would have received black boots. A friend of mine enlisted right out of High School (1961) and received brogans for basic and the cap toed blk boots for AP School. In 1964 we received the cap toed brogans and then I received the blk boots for AP School the only difference was they did not have the cap toe.

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I would imaging by the the mid 50's he would have received black boots. A friend of mine enlisted right out of High School (1961) and received brogans for basic and the cap toed blk boots for AP School. In 1964 we received the cap toed brogans and then I received the blk boots for AP School the only difference was they did not have the cap toe.

How about the GI combat boots say in the 53-57 period, Brown was the standard color issue boot up till the late 56-ish September 1, 1956 (ref. DA Circular 670-5, July 1956), for the Army, and unlike the Marine Corps who had their own style issue boot, as well as web gear, the Air Force used Army stuff.

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In my research I didn't find any brown boots being issued to ground personnel however, there is a great shot of the inside of of the F-86 cockpit and the pilot was wearing beautiful brown boots. I don't think it mattered in combat.

I found a pair of AF issue steel toed boots which were black and I have a pair of steel toed brogans issued to a trainee at Shepherd AFB. Neither of them had a cap toe. I should have mentioned that the welt (tread) on the brogans and boots of the 50 - 60's was a Goodyear smooth sole.

The military attempted to solve several problems with leather boots. The first problem was traction. The purpose behind this was experience of trying to walk in the mud of SEA. With the older Goodyear welt the boots had a rather smooth sole. Take a couple of steps and you had ten pounds of red clay on your foot!

Leather boots began to be issued (date unk, my pair is dated 1981) with a sole pattern that looked like the tread on WW2 tires! They had V shaped cuts in the sole that was supposed to push mud away from the center when you put your weight down.

This was actually a return to a 1944 pattern. They called it the Panama sole because this was where it was first tested. Give credit to the designer Sergeant Raymond Dobie.

When the AF later introduced the Panama sole it was not well received but the 1st issue of the actual Jungle boot had been fielded as an optional footwear.

The Panama sole also was flat and could slip on flat or wet surfaces so it was back to the drawing board. The AF, alway shying away from anything that looks like "combat" after all you can't spit shine a canvas upper!

The AF also wanted to solve another problem with full top boots. If you tie the lace to tight at the ankle it can cause discomfort. The answer was the "notch" boot (late 1970s into the 1980s) that was developed to attempt to alleviate the lace preassure on the front of the ankle.

The sole was changed from the Panama sole. The “fix” was an attempt at a waffle or zigzag pattern. This pattern was not as aggressive as a Vibram style lug sole type which which was issued in the Jungle Boot (1970) which had its own problems. There in a nutshell is the story of the Boot Combat.

 

Now this would have been in Chapter 15 of Into the Blue Volume 3, fatigues to the ABU IF Schiffer would print it. They declined as sales for volume 2 was slow. I tried to convince them that this was an entirely different subject but... If you can email Schiffer's and ask when volume 3 will be out it would certainly help. Lt.Col. Shulz has sugested we cut it into two volumes WW2 USAAF to the last issue BEFORE thw Woodland. Then the next volume would be camoflauge. A thought.

 

Thanks guys who have purchased 1 and 2. Hope they helped.

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Major General Reverend ROBERT P. TAYLOR.

Chief of Chaplains United States Air Force 1966.

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Gen Taylor (April 11, 1909 – February 1, 1997), in his early military career he seems to have went first to an Air Corps post, Barksdale Field, then to a ground unit, the ground-est, an Infantry unit, the 31st Infantry. Philippine Division. Captured by the Japanese, after the war he then goes back to Barksdale, then enters the new U.S.A.F.

 

 

A excellent BIo on him.

http://www.af.mil/About-Us/Biographies/Display/Article/105393/chaplain-major-general-robert-p-taylor/

 

It's interesting to note that he was not awarded the Purple Heart when he was wounded, now a days the award is conferred upon a friendly fire causality, do not know when this was changed.

 

This from the operative section on PH Criteria's.

 

It is not intended that such a strict interpretation of the requirement for the wound or injury to be caused by direct result of hostile action be taken that it would preclude the award being made to deserving personnel. Commanders must also take into consideration the circumstances surrounding an injury, even if it appears to meet the criteria. In the case of an individual injured while making a parachute landing from an aircraft that had been brought down by enemy fire; or, an individual injured as a result of a vehicle accident caused by enemy fire, the decision will be made in favor of the individual and the award will be made. As well, individuals wounded or killed as a result of "friendly fire" in the "heat of battle" will be awarded the Purple Heart as long as the "friendly" projectile or agent was released with the full intent of inflicting damage or destroying enemy troops or equipment. Individuals injured as a result of their own negligence, such as by driving or walking through an unauthorized area known to have been mined or placed off limits or searching for or picking up unexploded munitions as war souvenirs, will not be awarded the Purple Heart as they clearly were not injured as a result of enemy action, but rather by their own negligence.

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Some various photos from the 20 year career of one Joann Bolitho, USAF 1958-1978.

 

 

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Graduation portrait as a 2nd Lieutenant 1958.

 

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Vietnam as a Captain circa 1967

 

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Retirement portrait as a Lieutenant Colonel 1978

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Some various photos from the 20 year career of one Joann Bolitho, USAF 1958-1978.

 

 

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Graduation portrait as a 2nd Lieutenant 1958.

 

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Vietnam as a Captain circa 1967

 

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Retirement portrait as a Lieutenant Colonel 1978

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