Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Got this from the Vet who brought it home in 1964. It's chambered for something like a 9mm. A Parabellum round doesn't quite fit. Crude, but effective. Carved from a hard tropical wood, with steel working parts, and a brass floor plate. And a lanyard loop! It's about the size of a M1911. Painted Horizon Blue. Maybe using captured French paint?

 

MVC_083S.JPG

MVC_084S.JPG


donation2017.gif

donation2016.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was either a brave or desperate man who carried that thing with a round chambered in it, and an even braver man that would have pulled the trigger. The fact that these things just didn't blow up in their owner's hands is amazing.


Gil Burket
Omaha, NE
Specializing in Fakes and Reproductions
of the Vietnam War

burkcats@hotmail.com

 

"One is easily fooled by that which one loves."

 

Moliere: Tartuffe

 

donation2017.gif

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a serious 'Viet cong' ersatz made piece!


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif
donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gif

After having a double bypass this past year, it's time to downsize and pass along much of my 'stuff'. I've had my fun, now it is someone elses turn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting piece.

 

Thanks for sharing :thumbsup:


Written contributor to French Militaria Magazine, UK World War II Re-enactors Magazine &The Karkee Web Research Team.

Remembering the service of:
9095 Pte Alfred Fredrick NEWLAND, 7th Field Ambulance, 2 Division, AIF. WIA 16/11/16 France.
436 Private Albert McCANN, B Company 8th Battalion AIF. Enlisted 26/8/14. Killed in Action 17/6/15 Gallipoli.
VX24056 Gunner George Edward McCANN, 2/3 Composite Anti Aircraft Regiment. Enlisted 7/6/40. Discharged 3/8/44. Served in Australia and New Guinea.



donation2016.gif

donation2013.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2008.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Robin That is interesting. Thanks for posting. I have had to shoot a number of similar devices and somehow most held together, at least long enought to get sample bullets and ctg cases. I have a better job now (at times :lol: )

 

How does it work? Is it semi or single shot? A friend has the matching carbine to your pistol. We never measured the bore but I thought it was 9mm Makarov. His is blowback with no provision for locked breech and a light bolt so I doubt it it would handle 9mm Parabellum more than once.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"How does it work? Is it semi or single shot? A friend has the matching carbine to your pistol. We never measured the bore but I thought it was 9mm Makarov. His is blowback with no provision for locked breech and a light bolt so I doubt it it would handle 9mm Parabellum more than once."

 

This pistol sounds just like your friends carbine. Simple blow back, but a single shot. Pull back the bolt until the sear engages a notch in the bottom of the bolt. Drop in a round. Pull the trigger and pray that you don't shoot yourself. There is no extractor, just a fixed firing pin. There is sort of a safety notch at the top of the bolt slot. The cocking handle is just a piece of heavy wire, folded back on itself. You lift the wire until it engages in the safety slot.


donation2017.gif

donation2016.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"How does it work? Is it semi or single shot? A friend has the matching carbine to your pistol. We never measured the bore but I thought it was 9mm Makarov. His is blowback with no provision for locked breech and a light bolt so I doubt it it would handle 9mm Parabellum more than once."

 

This pistol sounds just like your friends carbine. Simple blow back, but a single shot. Pull back the bolt until the sear engages a notch in the bottom of the bolt. Drop in a round. Pull the trigger and pray that you don't shoot yourself. There is no extractor, just a fixed firing pin. There is sort of a safety notch at the top of the bolt slot. The cocking handle is just a piece of heavy wire, folded back on itself. You lift the wire until it engages in the safety slot.

 

Thanks Robin

So an "open bolt", single shot? I wonder if the bolt has enought mass to survive. (Don't try it for my morbid curiosity, you might loose a body part. :lol: ) I'll bet it would work and may not need an extrator but use the force of the ctg to extract like some Berettas. Next time I see my friend I will take some pics of his carbine. It was closed bolt, semi and had an 8-10 shot mag. As near as I remember we only found file marks and not machine marks, so someone spent a long time on it and had quite a bit of "junkyard" skill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always found VC made weapons very very interesting. Thanks for sharing. Hopefully I will be able to pick one up eventually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neat piece. Do you have papers with it?

 

No papers. I didn't think to ask the vet, but I will now.


donation2017.gif

donation2016.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think (keeping with the french theme) it is chambered (is that even the right word for one of these?) in that odd 7.65 french long or 9mm browning (.380) both french military calibers.... Would make it an early peice, made during or shortly after french occupation.


Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.