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I have 5 angle head flashlights. #1 is a TL-122D made by MICRO-LIGHT with a hanger and a slot on the endcap. ( IT DOES NOT LIGHT ) #2 is a MX-99/U made by FULTON MADE IN THE USA with wings on the switch. #3 is a US MX-991/U made by FULTON MADE IN THE USA with wings on the switch. #4 is a US MX-991/U made by GT PRICE PRODUCTS with no wings on the switch. #5 is a TL-122 with wings on the switch and no maker marks in the circle above the switch. I assume it is a reproduction? I assume numbers 2, 3, 4 were used in VIETNAM. My questions are, #1 What light was used during KOREA? #2 HOW CAN I GET THE TL-122D TOO WORK? The bulb is good and I saw that some one had already asked this question about the TL- 122 models but I can not find it. #3 WHAT IS THE SLOTS FOR? Four have a square indentation in the endcaps.

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I have 5 angle head flashlights. #1 is a TL-122D made by MICRO-LIGHT with a hanger and a slot on the endcap. ( IT DOES NOT LIGHT ) #2 is a MX-99/U made by FULTON MADE IN THE USA with wings on the switch. #3 is a US MX-991/U made by FULTON MADE IN THE USA with wings on the switch. #4 is a US MX-991/U made by GT PRICE PRODUCTS with no wings on the switch. #5 is a TL-122 with wings on the switch and no maker marks in the circle above the switch. I assume it is a reproduction? I assume numbers 2, 3, 4 were used in VIETNAM. My questions are, #1 What light was used during KOREA? #2 HOW CAN I GET THE TL-122D TOO WORK? The bulb is good and I saw that some one had already asked this question about the TL- 122 models but I can not find it. #3 WHAT IS THE SLOTS FOR? Four have a square indentation in the endcaps.

#1 is late WW2- and later, including Korea;

#4 is Vietnam (these didn't have the switch protector);

#2, 3 are post-Vietnam;

#5 I don't know, but these lights were made commercially so it is possible.

 

You can take the TL-122-D apart and clean the metal parts by sanding them so you get a good electrical contact. Don't forget the metal parts in the head, behind the bulb. I'm not sure what identations/slots you are referring to.

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

Money can't buy happiness -- but somehow it's more comfortable to cry in a Corvette than in a Yugo.

 

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#1 is late WW2- and later, including Korea;

#4 is Vietnam (these didn't have the switch protector);

#2, 3 are post-Vietnam;

#5 I don't know, but these lights were made commercially so it is possible.

 

You can take the TL-122-D apart and clean the metal parts by sanding them so you get a good electrical contact. Don't forget the metal parts in the head, behind the bulb. I'm not sure what identations/slots you are referring to.

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

[/quo #1 Looks like you can slide the light onto something? #2-5 Looks like you can take the light and press it onto something. I typed flashights in the SEARCH above. When I got the results some of the photos has the same cap indentations as mine.

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[/quo #1 Looks like you can slide the light onto something? #2-5 Looks like you can take the light and press it onto something. I typed flashights in the SEARCH above. When I got the results some of the photos has the same cap indentations as mine.

 

I think the indentations you're referring to might be where the metal lanyard ring is supposed to be? This was something that was added to post-WW2 flashlights, I believe, as I have never seen an original TL-122D with a lanyard ring, only the MX-991/U type models. Maybe the ring is missing from yours? It would be helpful if you could post a picture.

 

As far as cleaning goes, you can try that David suggested. Also see my instructions in the following post; I've had a 100% success rate using this method, but use it at your own risk!!!

Cleaning Instructions

 

 

If the contact corrosion is in the switch on your light, you might be SOL as the 122D is a waterproof model, but it never hurts to try.

 

Cheers,

Fletcher

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