Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Here is a CDV of John Wilkes Booth

post-415-1178732816.jpg


This DAY of FREEDOM brought to you by current Military Personnel and Veterans.

! HAVE A NICE DAY !

 

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Steve,

 

I enjoy looking at old photos but don't know a lot about them. Could you tell me what CDV stands for?

 

BTW, it is an interesting photo. I also enjoy studying Lincoln.

 

Thanks,

Jim


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif

 

 

Collecting WWII Armor and Tank Destroyer Items

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CDV = "Carte de Visite", a small format photographic print on card stock. They enjoyed tremendous popularity in the 1850s and onward, used by individuals to give their portraits to friends and family and by professionals as advertising, such as the Booth CDV.

 

Most were studio portraits, so the detail in them can be very handy for historical research. You'll see military poses where you can read the buttons on the uniforms.

 

Very collectable in their own right, they can interesting personality to other collections.


Jeff Floyd

The universe is made up of neutrons, protons, electrons and morons

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

 

donation2017.gif

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carte De Visite literally a "visitor's card" used something like a business card. Most CDVs are about the size of a modern business card. They were produced in quantity and the subject would hand them out as the occasion required. For example Booth may have presented them to admirers and people in the business of staging plays.

 

Apparently photographers would also keep a stock on hand and sell them to anyone wanting to purchase one. This was especially true of Civil War personalities, so studios like Brady's and others actively sought to have people pose for images.

 

However "common" people also had their images recorded on CDV. They are obviously more durable than the processes developed on glass, and were a positive image unlike ferrotypes. CDVs are often found with postage stamps and addresses on the reverse where the CDV was mailed usually to a relative. These mailed CDVs are more desireable to collectors.

 

CDVs were so popular and inexpensive that albums especially made to display CDVs were manufactured. In my family the album had mostly CDVs of familiy members and friends. There were two CDVs of soldiers identified as family. There was also four CDVs of Civil War Generals, all of which were similarly identified and all from the Brady studio.

 

The images printed on this format were very stable and usually survive in very good condition if not otherwise abused or neglected. The format seems to have been replaced by cabinet cards shortly after the Civil War and CDV images were often copied and re-printed in the larger and even more stable cabinet card format.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite often the subject would sign their name to the back side of the card so you will find them with original signatures. These , in turn, would be presented as calling cards at formal occasions.

 

Greg


My collection is strictly what my dad brought back from the ETO.

Sgt. Mahlon E. Sebring, 82nd Airborne, 319th Glider Field Artillery, A Battery - Normandy, Holland, The Bulge, and Germany... finishing with occupation duty in Berlin

http://ww2-airborne....ts/319/319.html

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif
donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif



		

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys,

 

These are really interesting. I have found a few stores on eBay selling these and enjoy looking through their listings.


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif

 

 

Collecting WWII Armor and Tank Destroyer Items

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to point out that this CDV was likely produced to market "Booth the Actor", and not "Booth the Assassin". Of course, this image became popular after Lincoln's death in the light of infamy, and not fame.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carte De Visite literally a "visitor's card" used something like a business card. Most CDVs are about the size of a modern business card. They were produced in quantity and the subject would hand them out as the occasion required. For example Booth may have presented them to admirers and people in the business of staging plays.

 

Apparently photographers would also keep a stock on hand and sell them to anyone wanting to purchase one. This was especially true of Civil War personalities, so studios like Brady's and others actively sought to have people pose for images.

 

However "common" people also had their images recorded on CDV. They are obviously more durable than the processes developed on glass, and were a positive image unlike ferrotypes. CDVs are often found with postage stamps and addresses on the reverse where the CDV was mailed usually to a relative. These mailed CDVs are more desireable to collectors.

 

CDVs were so popular and inexpensive that albums especially made to display CDVs were manufactured. In my family the album had mostly CDVs of familiy members and friends. There were two CDVs of soldiers identified as family. There was also four CDVs of Civil War Generals, all of which were similarly identified and all from the Brady studio.

 

The images printed on this format were very stable and usually survive in very good condition if not otherwise abused or neglected. The format seems to have been replaced by cabinet cards shortly after the Civil War and CDV images were often copied and re-printed in the larger and even more stable cabinet card format.

 

Thank you, very informative.



The bended knee is not a tradition of our Corps. (General A. A. Vandegrift, USMC, 5 May 1946)

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting? Yes. But this is picture of the civilian assassin of a U.S. President. It is an inappropriate posting as this U.S. Militaria Forum is "Dedicated to the heroes who put these tools to work in freedom's name." Booth's picture doesn't fit in here. I have a lot of "interesting" non-U.S. military items that I could post but wouldn't because this is not the place for them. I think it should be taken down to avoid other "Not military but interesting" submissions.

Bob


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif
"I have only two men out of my company and 20 out of some other company. We need support, but it is almost suicide to try to get it here as we are swept by machine gun fire and constant barrage is on us. I have no one on my left and only a few on my right. I will hold." (Message sent by 1st Lt. Clifton B. Cates. USMC, 96th Co., Soissons, 19 July 1918 - later 19th Commandant of the Marine Corps 1948-1952)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bobgee,

 

I am sorry to say, I couldn't disagree more. John Wilkes Booth is an importat figure when studying this time period. Just because he had commited a dispicable act of tyranny, does not mean that he is not worthy of discussion on this forum. To "black-out" names that we dislike, is to only sugar coat history, and act like certain events never happened. This is not a fair treatmet of history. I am all for the United States, and the U.S. Militaria Forum. But let me ask you this:

 

How different was the fire bombing of London, by the Luftwaffe any different than the Allied bombing of Dresden? There is little difference.

 

The moral of the story is this: Despite our own fervant patriotism, (Including my own), we need to humble ourselves, and understand, and accept that the United States has it's own dark past. In war this is especially true, and by its very nature, there is little good that can come out of it. In war, we, as a people can act both with compassion, and as animals. Anyone who has been there will attest to this. To understand American miltary history is to learn with an objective mind.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting? Yes. But this is picture of the civilian assassin of a U.S. President. It is an inappropriate posting as this U.S. Militaria Forum is "Dedicated to the heroes who put these tools to work in freedom's name." Booth's picture doesn't fit in here. I have a lot of "interesting" non-U.S. military items that I could post but wouldn't because this is not the place for them. I think it should be taken down to avoid other "Not military but interesting" submissions.

Bob

 

Bob,

I also have to disagree. Booth was not a civilian, but an agent of the Confederacy. He had met with Jefferson Davis and other ranking Confederate officials. His initial plans involved kidnapping President Lincoln and forcing the war to an early end. He served the Confederacy as much as John Bell Hood or Pat Cleburne. Now if you want to ban it because it is not a true "U.S." item, but a "C.S.A." item, you may have be able to argue that point.


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif



" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. "

View my website honoring the men and women of Indiana: http://indianavets.wix.com/indiana-at-war and follow my updates on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/IndianaModernAgeofWar/
Interested in US uniforms? Join the Association of American Military Uniform Collectors! http://aamuc.org/or find us on Facebook! facebook.com/AAMUC.ORG

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob,

I also have to disagree. Booth was not a civilian, but an agent of the Confederacy. He had met with Jefferson Davis and other ranking Confederate officials. His initial plans involved kidnapping President Lincoln and forcing the war to an early end. He served the Confederacy as much as John Bell Hood or Pat Cleburne. Now if you want to ban it because it is not a true "U.S." item, but a "C.S.A." item, you may have be able to argue that point.

 

 

I have deleted several posts that got too far afield. CSA militaria is US Militaria (this was a war between states, not nations) and while Booth may not have been a rank and file Confederate soldier, he acted to affect the outcome of the war and probably thought of himself as a combatant. His CDV is a curiosity of this purely American war and not an excuse to argue the causes of the war or lambast others who see history differently than you do.



donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

donation2019.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.