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us army ranger chow time in field


msgt norway
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msgt norway

rangers need food to :)

 

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menu 6

Smoky Franks TS 3.75oz

Fruit FD

Potato Sticks

Peanut Butter

Crackers

Candy*

Cocoa

Sugar Free Bev Base

Hot Sauce

Spoon

Acc Pkt A

FRH

 

made in 1994, the franks was ruined :( the rest of the mre was real nice!!

cheers from ken in norway

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DutchInfid3l

The four fingers of death (franks) were never good anyway, consider yourself spared! :) Those and the Ham slice. Yuck.

Here's an interesting site all about MREs, all years menus, heaters and even what's in each accessory packet if you're interested. MRE info link

Nice pictures though!

 

-Sarah

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msgt norway

thanks DutchInfid3l :)

 

im already a member there.

the ham slice was good with beans in tomato sauce mixed together :drool2:

and the dry strawberry....yum yum

 

cheers ken

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They still had the very gross omelette back then as well. We avoided those with extreme prejudice! MRE's today are so much better!

 

-Ski

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Norway! You have to put some kind of disclaimer up when you do something like this. I opened this thread and when I saw that open MRE, I almost vomited all over my daughter that was sitting here with me. Please, help protect the children :crying:

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msgt norway

:salute: will make a warning post next time when

posting pictures of open mres and eating them :whistling: :blush:

 

ken

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X_redcatcher
If you open the chicken ala king, please wear a HAZMAT suit.

 

Save the rest of us,,just don't open it. :w00t: That is one thing I don't miss

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Meal, Ready to Eat... Three lies for the price of one... also known as Mr. E (Mystery, because you never knew if it would be good or bad till you opened it) and Meal, Rejected by Ethiopeans. We had a rather crude name for the frankfurters, but Four fingers of Death was used too, Chicken ala King was Vomit in a bag (it actually looked better coming up), and at least in the older dark brown bags, I've never seen a ham slice that wasnt bad. Most were the consistancy of goo and smelled to high heaven. The only good things about the older dark brown bags were the potato sticks, dried fruit, and the Pork and Beef patties along with the freeze dried potato patty. You could make a pretty good cheese burger with them if you had access to lots of water to heat to reconstitute them, and a cheese spread packet. The original menus were superceded because they used too much water to reconstitute them, and barring that, dehydrated the soldier eating them dry.

 

Later menus weren't so bad... having good things like Chili mac and Spaghetti and meat balls (both excellent with a cheese packet melted in them and a little hotsauce), Tuna and noodles, Chicken and rice. Wet fruit such as peaches, pears, and fruit cocktail and applesauce were great, and the hot sauce was always greatly appreciated. There were also neat items like the white rice... heated with a cheese packet melted in it... yum. You could get really creative with the later MREs...

 

I'm just a little sorry I've missed the more recent menus... sounds like they have a lot of really good stuff now.

 

Wayne

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DSCN1474.jpg

 

Ken

 

Has anyone told you, you need to shave that "stache" off !!! I recall "Bat boyz" couldn't have mustaches let alone any hair.

 

You should be wearing some gortex too versus field jacket

 

I Don't miss MREs

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

There are some guys that were in the Batt's here. We got a lot of Ranger Rejects in the 82nd and some were good soldiers. They said that if you were a non-tabber that you had to stay shaved. Never saw a Ranger with a mustache during my stint.

 

I ate the original Vietnam C Rations and then the 1st generation MRE's. They were horrible but there a rememdy to most of them---lots of tobasco sauce. Buy a medium bottle to take to the field. Also, purchase some ramen noodles and mix the dry meats and spices into a canteen cup, add water and heat. Makes an excellent meal. We did this in the early to mid eighties and it was edible. But, always add tobasco. The MRE people came out and asked our opinion about improving the MRE and that's how they got to include the small tobasco bottle.

 

The field jacket- Most of us didn't bother with a field jacket or even a gortex. Bring a wool sweater for static activity, camoflauge poncho and poncho liner rolled together (ranger sleeping bag). We were usually moving too fast and far and even in cool weather our body heat often caused us to keep the layers of clothing off. As we cooled off we would add layers and then wrap up in a poncho/liner sleeping bag. As time passed, the poncho/liner could be folded small enough to slip into a pocket or wrapped in blousing bands around the back of your web belt. Often, we would use a two quart canteen strap as a sling for our rifles, or a as a dummy cord. Wrap the metal buckles in tape to keep it quiet. You could use either end to attach to anything to keep your weapon secure, or to sling it. It was wide and long enough to give you plenty of slack.

 

Rock

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The four fingers of death (franks) were never good anyway, consider yourself spared! :) Those and the Ham slice. Yuck.

Here's an interesting site all about MREs, all years menus, heaters and even what's in each accessory packet if you're interested. MRE info link

Nice pictures though!

 

-Sarah

 

WHAT R YOU TALKING ABOUT?? Four fingers of death aka (term deleted: sorry, but family friendly forum. gwb123) were awsome!!! Same with the ham roof tile!!! man I miss those!!! yum yum!!!

 

paul

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There are some guys that were in the Batt's here. We got a lot of Ranger Rejects in the 82nd and some were good soldiers. They said that if you were a non-tabber that you had to stay shaved. Never saw a Ranger with a mustache during my stint.

 

I ate the original Vietnam C Rations and then the 1st generation MRE's. They were horrible but there a rememdy to most of them---lots of tobasco sauce. Buy a medium bottle to take to the field. Also, purchase some ramen noodles and mix the dry meats and spices into a canteen cup, add water and heat. Makes an excellent meal. We did this in the early to mid eighties and it was edible. But, always add tobasco. The MRE people came out and asked our opinion about improving the MRE and that's how they got to include the small tobasco bottle.

 

The field jacket- Most of us didn't bother with a field jacket or even a gortex. Bring a wool sweater for static activity, camoflauge poncho and poncho liner rolled together (ranger sleeping bag). We were usually moving too fast and far and even in cool weather our body heat often caused us to keep the layers of clothing off. As we cooled off we would add layers and then wrap up in a poncho/liner sleeping bag. As time passed, the poncho/liner could be folded small enough to slip into a pocket or wrapped in blousing bands around the back of your web belt. Often, we would use a two quart canteen strap as a sling for our rifles, or a as a dummy cord. Wrap the metal buckles in tape to keep it quiet. You could use either end to attach to anything to keep your weapon secure, or to sling it. It was wide and long enough to give you plenty of slack.

Rock

 

In the Ranger Batt's there were no mustaches and you'd better have a fresh high & tight every monday morning at first formation. In the pre-gortex days, field jackets were NEVER worn, any snivel gear had to be worn under the fatigue shirt and not be visible.

 

The Gurkas came to Ft. Lewis for some training in the early 80's. We worked with them quite a bit and did some training together. One day during typical Ft. Lewis weather (40 degrees and raining) a Britich Major asked my Platoon Sergeant, "why aren't your men wearing cold weather gear?" To which my Platoon Sergeant responded, "Because it's not HOOAH.". The British Major then replied, "well any bloody fool can be miserable."

 

We started testing civilian poly pro and gortex sometime in 1983.

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I will say that heated, the Four fingers weren't too bad... especially if you could get your hands on the shelf stable bread.... a little Ketchup powder and some cheese... yeah... not too bad at all.

 

Wayne

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giconceptsjw

I never would have guessed in a million years that anyone would collect MRE’s. I hate to admit it now but I’ve thrown unopened cases of MRE’s in the garbage because the expiration date had passed. I’ve eaten most all of the different menus and I never thought any of them were all that bad. I just didn’t like eating the main menu item cold. BTW, believe it or not, I went on a 3 month long camping trip with my father to Alaska in 1974. He had bought an unopened case of WWII K-rations dated 1944 and we ate them. Not all the time but we finished the case over the course of the trip. I found a can that was swollen so my dad told me to throw it away. Other than that, we ate them all no problem and I just gave the cigarettes to my dad. Yep, he smoked them too. I remember finding one book of matches inside that had a warning about VD on the cover. I asked my dad, “what’s VD?” He just didn’t answer me. :think:

 

JW

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thanks for comments and feed back :)

 

special note from my wife: If you shave your mustache theres no more

collecting army gear!!!!!!!!!!! :fear:

so the brush stays on... :P

 

cheers from ken

 

btw old rations wanted: mres c rations.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I remember that Latewatch,the Ghurkas and 3rd Para were there right after the Falklands,to train for Germany. I still have the Kukri the one Sgt. gave me. We used to get really pissed, (drunk) with them at the PX beerhall that was bout half way between the Rangers and my Company.As I recall,you could forgive them for being cold as the Falklands was in their "summer" season.One of the reasons they came to Lewis was acclimation also.I remember one of my guys was from Alabama and fell on the floor speechless the first time he heard one of the black fellas speaking with an english accent,too damn funny!!!!

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Ever try the "MRE challenge"? A prior-service cook at ROTC camp clued me into this. It's physically impossible to eat the two crackers in less than two minutes, no matter what you wash it down with. Sounds like a snap to do. I fell for it, as did every single person I tried it on afterward. Even one of my CW3's just back from Ranger School couldn't do it! :rolleyes:

Those and the Ham slice. Yuck.

I disagree. On those rare occasions we got the "shelf stable bread," the ham slice and some cheese made a darned good sandwich after you've been in the field for a few days (then again, even the M&Ms started to taste like real ones after enough time of eating these things. I used to say every time I opened those, "The milk chocolate won't melt in your hand, your mouth, a blast furnace, the surface of the sun..."). :lol:

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

There ya have it from some actual Rangers:

 

Lose the mustache.

Lose the field jacket.

Cut your hair.

Get patches squared away.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------

 

Constructive criticism:

 

I'll add something else. If you're eating tactical chow then you would be in the field, and therefore you would be wearing camoflauge on your face, hands neck ears and any exposed skin. You would be in a tactical position and would have your weapon facing into your assigned sector of fire. Unless on patrol, you would likely have a hasty fighting position. On patrol you would be in the prone and eating silently and taking turns. Someone would be watching your sector of fire while you ate.

 

While it's nice to see guys wearing uniforms and eating period food, I assure you that the uniform and MRE part of "chow in the field" was of minor importance compared to Standard Operating procedures and technical and tactical procedures. Chow is not a big deal in the Army; maintaining proper tactical awareness *is* the priority. That means that you will be ready to move, you will make sure that all sectors of fire are covered by an alert soldier, and that cammo, weapons, ammo, early warning devices, booby traps, and commo has been established before chow even starts. I'm not certain of Ranger Batt SOP's but I am aware of LRRP SOP's.

 

What happens before, during and after chow is what puts the "tactical" into chow. The picture would have been more accurate if you were laying prone, in full tactical gear (maybe behind a ruck), camoflauged up, with your weapon facing into your sector of fire, in a RP or ORP and eating silenty while watching.

 

Read the LRP, LRRP, Ranger series (Six silent men?) if you want to see how it was done in Vietnam. They laid the ground work for the Ranger Handbook and many of the Ranger SOP's.

 

Depending on the mission they would move silently through the bush. Upon finishing their movement they would lay "dog" for .30 minutes then move silently to a different Night Defensive Position. Once in their final NDP they would lay dog for 30 minutes. The PL would call in their position and perform radio checks. After settling his team into their positions and assigning sectors of fire he would run clover leaf security checks to ensure of security and define and danger areas. They would set out early warning devices and/or claymores. They would check weapons and ammo and then update their personal camoflauge. The SOP for chow was set so that only one man at a time would eat. After eating the team would have an SOP for night watch (usually 50% minimum or 100% if tactially warranted). They would stand-to the EENT and BMNT.

 

Anyway, it's been a long time and there is so much more to "tactical chow" than wearing the uniform and having the rations. When someone says tactical chow to me my mind goes to all the tasks that are a priority before anyone pulls chow out to eat. Seeing a guy in a garrison outfit sitting there with an MRE makes me think of having an MRE while pulling guard duty or something.

 

Being an Infantryman is much, much more indepth than uniforms, rifles and rations. The individual and team tasks that must be learned, practiced, rehearsed and perfected before "tactical chow" can happen properly would discourage the average reenactor.

 

Rock

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rangers need food to :)
Negative, candidate! Rangers can press on without food, ammo, good weather, uniforms, boots or ever what's left of your brain. You drive on, hooah! :thumbsup: I'm reminded of running the Yankee Road land nav course at Benning as a ROTC cadet in 97 at night once. I was at a point with my red lens flashlight writing down a point and orienting my map for the next azimuth, and out of the brush came a soldier with a ruck the size of a Buick and a patrol cap on. You just knew what he was all about even in the dark. I had full TA-50 on and a Kevalr, so he knew I wasn't cadre. I held out my extra MRE and said, "take it candiate, you need it more than I do." He thought it was a trick. I pulled out my wallet and showed him my cadet ID. He spent five minutes thanking me, swearing that if he ever became my Platoon SGT, he'd make my life perfect. I think he promised me a long weekend with his sister, too, now I think on it. :think: I just hope he remebers that someone cared that night.
When someone says tactical chow to me my mind goes to all the tasks that are a priority before anyone pulls chow out to eat.
Heck, to me, it comes to my mind that I'll go hungry. Of all the meals I've attempted to eat in the field under "tactical" conditions (especially admin-style FTXs), I never finished one. Either someone would call me into my second or third bite with the never fails, "Hey, LT, Six is on the radio for you," or, "Sir, [insert name of solider who constantly has discipline issues] just did something stupid and his Platoon SGT is looking for you, oh and Six is over there, too with the 1st SGT." That, or I'd wait at the end of the chow line they'd run out just as I got there and I'd insist on making another run just for me if it's DEFAC food (at least I was always smart enough to smuggle power bars and pop tarts into my ruck). I alwasy laugh at movies when soldiers have meals that are leisurely even my civilian standards. I rarely ever saw anyone in the Army eating like that and never in the field!
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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

Eat by rank, lowest to highest. That's why Officers don't get much chow sometimes. I always brought extra C Rats to the field to feed my LT's; especially the new 2nd LT's. They would run their asses off so I'd keep the hand food for them. Most of the new Lt's were newly minted Rangers and they hadn't yet recovered from Ranger school. They were in eat everything mode, trying to replenish the muscle and fat they'd lost. A good NCO makes sure to provide success for young Lt's and that also means chow.

 

Rock

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Oh my God.... Beef Slices in BBQ Sauce and the Chicken Ala King were the WORST! :( My favorite was the Corned Beef Hash...when I was in Desert Storm I used to do whatever I could to get the Corned beef hash...my way of preparing it was to crunch up the crackers into it, add a little bit of water, pepper and tabasco sauce...heated up it made a pretty good meal...I also liked putting MRE peanut butter on the chocolate bar (John Wayne bars, yay!) Remember the dehydrated beef patty and pork patty?

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here are some pictures from my ration collection:

coolitems.jpg

 

mre1993.jpg

 

mre1993dinner.jpg

 

mat13.jpg

 

mat14.jpg

 

love the corned beef hash to :smokin:

 

cheers ken

 

 

 

old brown bag mres wanted also c rations

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