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Custom Ribbon Bars--Any era!


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  • 4 months later...

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The Theater Made ribbon and patch group of Major General Robert S. Beightler. CO of the 37th ”Buckeye” Division in WWII, Military Governor of Okinawa, Republican National Convention Delegate for Ohio, Mayor of Marble Cliff, Ohio, godfather of Ohio’s Highway system, prospective candidate for Governor of Ohio and the United States Congress, and close personal friend and colleague of Douglas MacArthur

In addition to this, he was the longest Serving Division Commander of WWII, and the Only National Guard General to maintain command of his division throughout the entirety of WWII. He was also one of only two National Guard Generals to be given permanent appointments to the regular army.

His awards are: The Distinguished Service Cross, Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Border Service Medal, WWI Victory Medal, WWI Occupation Medal, American Defense Medal, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, Philippine Liberation Medal, WWII Victory Medal, Philippine Independence Medal, WWII Occupation Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, and the Philippine Legion of Honor.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_S._Beightler


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Attributed custom made Ribbon group of Brigadier General Barnwell Rhett Legge:
Close friend of Theodore Roosevelt Jr., WWI Hero, renowned diplomat, and operative responsible for the safe escape of countless American POW’s during the course of WWII.

After graduating from the prestigious Citadel military academy in South Carolina, Legge saw heavy combat during the course of the Great War in the famed 26th Infantry Regiment of the 1st Division, having received the Distinguished Service Cross and 4 Silver Citation Stars (Later Silver Star Medals) for valor during the battle of Soissons, and after personally leading an attack during the Meuse Argonne offensive, during which he was wounded. In addition to also receiving the French Legion of Honor and two Croix d’Guerre’s, Legge’s supreme leadership capabilities earned him the Army Distinguished Service Medal, and the admiration of Colonel (later General) Theodore Roosevelt Jr. which would blossom into a lifelong friendship. Roosevelt would write of his friend in his book “Average Americans” that:

“All during my service in Europe, Legge served with me. During the latter part he was my second in command in the regiment. I have seen him under all circumstances. He was always cool and decided. No mission was too difficult for him to undertake. His ability as a troop leader was of the highest order. In my opinion no man of his age has a better war record.”
-Theodore Roosevelt Jr.

After serving as a tactical instructor at the Army Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Legge was presented with a new and highly prestigious role in 1939, Assistant Military Attaché to France.

After France fell to the Nazi’s in 1940, Legge was promoted to Brigadier General, and made US Military Attaché to Switzerland, whereby during the entire course of WWII, utilizing his many contacts in underground and resistance movements, helped countless American POW’s held by the Nazi’s escape to Switzerland, and return to Allied occupied territory. This was much to the infuriation of the Swiss government, who sought to publicly expose Legge’s network and discredit him. However, Legge being highly intelligent and cunning, utilized evidence of secret Swiss violations of international law to black mail them into silence.

Legge would hold his post as Military Attaché to Switzerland until his medical retirement from the Army in 1948 after 37 years of service.

Sadly, Legge would die the following year in 1949 at the age of 57.


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  • 1 month later...

My latest one. No name on the uniform, sadly, but it does have a 25th Infantry Division combat patch, and Military Personnel Center current assignment patch, plus four overseas bars.

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Jeff C.

USMF Member #2275

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On 9/13/2020 at 12:47 PM, CNY Militaria said:

I really like that style of ribbon bar with the bullion devices.

Me, too. As soon as I saw this uniform, and the custom ribbon bar, I jumped on it immediately. The ribbons look good in pictures, but man they look amazing in person.

Jeff C.

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 This ribbon bar belonged to Reade Tilley.  Reade was from Clearwater Fl, he joined the RCAF in June of 1940, arrived in the UK in April 1941 where he joined 121 Eagle Squadron in May. He was posted to 601 Squadron in April 1942 where he was one of the daring pilots that flew a Spitfire off the deck of the USS WASP to reinforce Malta. When in Malta he was posted to 126 Squadron. Reade became a 7 victory Ace while flying with the RAF in Malta, earning the British DFC, which was presented to him at Buckingham Palace in October 1942. Also in October Reade transferred to the USAAF where he was assigned to 8th AF Headquarters.  After the war Reade stayed in the AF and this ribbon bar is off of one of his post war service jackets.

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Always looking for 4th Fighter Group and 490th Bomb Group items.

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Great ribbon bar. Reminds me of this one I have this slated for my November auction. 

 

To say this Airman's career was unique, would be an understatement. Lucien Irving "Stag" Thomas, a London native transplanted to Richmond, VA, went to Canada in 1940 and joined the Canadian Black Watch Regiment. He transferred to the RCAF in 1941. As an aerial gunner, he flew over 100 combat missions, personally scoring between 4-7 aerial German aircraft kills (sources differ based on credited vs. probable). He was personally decorated with the Distinguished Flying Medal by King George V at Buckingham Palace in 1943, one of three Americans in the RCAF to ever have the honor, and also earned a Polish Cross of Valor, Czech War Cross, and a French Croix de Guerre. He was shot down once over the North Sea and spent 71 hours in the water until rescued by a British Destroyer. He transferred to the USAAF in 1943 and continued to fly missions, totaling 132 over Europe in WWII. Remaining in the USAF, he went to Korea, flying another 119 missions in B-26 Invaders. In Vietnam, he continued to sneak onto combat missions despite serving in a staff role. By career's end, he had flown over 400 missions in three wars. He was famous in 1952 for proclaiming that he would rather see combat in Korea than spend time with Marilyn Monroe, prompting her to invite him to meet her when he came home, but declining in order to remain at war.This was his mid 1950's era ribbon bar just post-Korea.

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Ebay Sales: wwii.uniform.collector

 

Auctioneer Website: http://www.cnymilitaria.com

 

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 This ribbon bar belonged to Reade Tilley.  Reade was from Clearwater Fl, he joined the RCAF in June of 1940, arrived in the UK in April 1941 where he joined 121 Eagle Squadron in May. He was posted to 601 Squadron in April 1942 where he was one of the daring pilots that flew a Spitfire off the deck of the USS WASP to reinforce Malta. When in Malta he was posted to 126 Squadron. Reade became a 7 victory Ace while flying with the RAF in Malta, earning the British DFC, which was presented to him at Buckingham Palace in October 1942. Also in October Reade transferred to the USAAF where he was assigned to 8th AF Headquarters.  After the war Reade stayed in the AF and this ribbon bar is off of one of his post war service jackets.
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Beautiful bar! I love sets to individuals with dual national services.


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Great ribbon bar. Reminds me of this one I have this slated for my November auction. 
 
To say this Airman's career was unique, would be an understatement. Lucien Irving "Stag" Thomas, a London native transplanted to Richmond, VA, went to Canada in 1940 and joined the Canadian Black Watch Regiment. He transferred to the RCAF in 1941. As an aerial gunner, he flew over 100 combat missions, personally scoring between 4-7 aerial German aircraft kills (sources differ based on credited vs. probable). He was personally decorated with the Distinguished Flying Medal by King George V at Buckingham Palace in 1943, one of three Americans in the RCAF to ever have the honor, and also earned a Polish Cross of Valor, Czech War Cross, and a French Croix de Guerre. He was shot down once over the North Sea and spent 71 hours in the water until rescued by a British Destroyer. He transferred to the USAAF in 1943 and continued to fly missions, totaling 132 over Europe in WWII. Remaining in the USAF, he went to Korea, flying another 119 missions in B-26 Invaders. In Vietnam, he continued to sneak onto combat missions despite serving in a staff role. By career's end, he had flown over 400 missions in three wars. He was famous in 1952 for proclaiming that he would rather see combat in Korea than spend time with Marilyn Monroe, prompting her to invite him to meet her when he came home, but declining in order to remain at war.This was his mid 1950's era ribbon bar just post-Korea.
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Gorgeous bar Justin!


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On 9/9/2020 at 7:13 PM, ItemCo16527 said:

My latest one. No name on the uniform, sadly, but it does have a 25th Infantry Division combat patch, and Military Personnel Center current assignment patch, plus four overseas bars.

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Update: after inspecting the lining of the uniform, I discovered pin holes above the ribbons that would match the placement of a Combat Infantryman Badge. Trying to decide if I should replace all of the missing insignia 🤔

Jeff C.

USMF Member #2275

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My latest, purchased off eBay from fellow forum member CNY Militaria. This veteran served with the Marines or Navy in Vietnam, and then with the Nevada Air National Guard. I'm surprised there's no Good Conduct Medal, but there could be several different reasons for this. The ribbons are a little soiled, so you can tell he actually wore these and they didn't just sit in a drawer unused. I absolutely love this group.

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Jeff C.

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The offer of precedence is a little messed up, but it does reflect an Air Reserve Forces Meritorious Service Medal with one oak leaf cluster, which is a Good Conduct Medal for Reservists.

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On 9/9/2020 at 7:13 PM, ItemCo16527 said:

Couldn't edit my above post, but what I meant to say was that I think the maker confused the order of precedence with that of the Armed Forces Reserve Medal.

Jeff C.

USMF Member #2275

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My latest, purchased off eBay from fellow forum member CNY Militaria. This veteran served with the Marines or Navy in Vietnam, and then with the Nevada Air National Guard. I'm surprised there's no Good Conduct Medal, but there could be several different reasons for this. The ribbons are a little soiled, so you can tell he actually wore these and they didn't just sit in a drawer unused. I absolutely love this group.
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Wow! I love this set! Looks like it was made by Leu’s Handicraft. Their stuff is gorgeous and extremely high quality.

-Jimmy


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  • 1 month later...

My latest acquisition which just arrived today: the Purple Heart with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster plus Korean War service ribbons, all embroidered on black backing. I believe these were made in Germany judging by how the 1, 7, and 9 are written.

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Jeff C.

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The Theater Made Ribbon Group of Captain Raul Brown Perez.

Born in 1925 to a distinguished naval family, Raul B. Perez began his service after graduating from Coronado High School in 1943 and enrolling in the University of Texas’ NROTC program. While in college, Perez became a star athlete on the University’s Varsity Football team and played under the direction of famed Coach Dana X. Bible, and alongside future NFL Hall of Fame running back Bobby Lane. After graduating early in 1945 with a degree in Political Science, he earned a commission as a Lieutenant in the US Navy, seeing limited service in the Pacific Theater during the end of WWII.

Five years later during the Korean War, Perez would gain his first command over USS Lincoln County, which saw extensive action during the conflict which included the famed landing at Inchon.

After the conclusion of the Korean War, Perez would go on to command: USS Ampere and USS Surfbird, before seeing action again aboard USS Colonial and USS Henrico during the Vietnam War. After attaining the permanent rank of Captain, Perez was placed in command of the Navy’s Amphibious Base in his hometown of Coronado, CA, and later served on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations.

After distinguishing himself to his superiors in this role, Perez was selected for the honor of serving as Naval Attaché to the US Embassy in Lisbon, Portugal, and later in the same role at various US Embassies in Peru and Ecuador before finally retiring from the Navy in 1976.

He would later pass away by his Wife’s side at the age of 76 in 2001.

His awards include:
The Legion of Merit (with V), Navy Presidential Unit Citation, Navy Unit Commendation (with 2 Stars), Meritorious Unit Commendation (with 2 Stars), American Campaign Medal, Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal, WWII Victory Medal, China Service Medal, Navy Occupation Medal, National Defense Service Medal (with Star), Korean Service Medal (with 4 Campaign Stars), Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Vietnam Service Medal (with 2 Stars), UN Korea Medal, the Peruvian Navy Cross, the Portuguese Order of Prince Henry the Navigator, the Portuguese Order of Military Merit, the Portuguese Naval Commendation Medal, the Ecuadorian Order of Abdon Calderon, the South Vietnamese Naval Distinguished Service Order, the South Korean Presidential Unit Citation, and the South Vietnamese Campaign Medal.340c10c89b751f932af44892487a36f2.jpg


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Grouping of Brigadier General Gerald A. Counts:

Career officer, esteemed professor, engineer, and Dean of the West Point Academic Board.

Gerald Counts was born in 1895 to a well respected family in Ranger, Texas. After moving to Long Beach, California at the turn of the century, Counts would receive an appointment to the US Military Academy at West Point, and would graduate with honors in 1917 (just in time for America’s involvement in WWI).

Counts was assigned to the 6th Engineer Regiment of the 3rd Division, and would see heavy action during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and the Defense of Verdun, receiving two Battle Clasps to his Victory Medal and the 1914-18 French Croix d’Guerre (which he chose to leave off of his ribbon bar for reasons unknown).

After pursuing his Masters of Engineering from MIT and CIT, he would begin a 34 year career as a professor at West Point, which would see him rise to Chair of the Physics and Mathematics Departments and as Dean of the Academic Board. His 34 years at West Point would only be interrupted by his involvement in the Second World War.

After America entered WWII, Counts would be placed in various planning roles until being assigned to the Engineering Section of Omar Bradley’s 12th Army Group in 1944, where he would again see heavy action at Normandy, Northern France, the Rhineland, the Ardennes, and Central Europe, which resulted in his award of the Bronze Star (among many other awards) being personally presented by General Bradley.

After the allied victory in Europe, Counts would remain in the 12th Army Group on occupation duties in Wiesbaden, Germany, where his expertise in Engineering was utilized in the reconstruction of Germany.

Counts would return to West Point in the late 1940’s, and would continue as a Professor, Department Chair, and Dean of the Academic Board until retiring in 1959 as the oldest active duty officer in the entire US Army. Unfortunately, Counts would pass away four years later in 1964, and would be buried with military honors at his beloved West Point. He was 68.

His awards include:
Three Legions of Merit (denoted by Oak Leaf Clusters *), the Bronze Star, WWI Victory Medal (with two Campaign Bars), WWI Occupation Medal, American Defense Medal, American Campaign Medal, European-North African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (with 5 Campaign Stars), WWII Victory Medal, WWII Occupation Medal, National Defense Service Medal, French Legion of Honor, *, WWII French Croix d’Guerre (with Palm), Member of the Order of the British Empire, the Luxembourgish Order of the Oak Crown, the Belgian Order of Leopold (with Palm), and the Belgian Croix d’Guerre (with Palm).

*not shown on ribbon bar:

WWI French Croix d’Guerre
Second Oak Leaf Cluster on Legion of Merit

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One of my favorite groupings with Theater Made Ribbons.

The grouping of US Navy Captain Leonard Harmon: 1938 graduate of the USNA, Navy Pilot, and one of only 217 US Naval personnel awarded decorations by the Soviet Union during WWII, having earned the Order of Glory 3rd Class for severely damaging the German Submarine U-966, which was eventually scuttled by her crew off the Spanish coast.

After spotting U-966, Harmon and the crew of his B-24 (along with another B-24) immediately began their attack, making several strafing runs over the U-Boat while encountering heavy flak from her anti aircraft gun. This flak severely damaged the B-24’s Bombay doors, rendering her unable to bomb the German vessel, and her primary armament useless. In spite of this heavy damage, and the ongoing barrage of flak from the enemy submarine, Harmon continued his attacks until running dangerously low on fuel, which forced him to return to England. Later on, more allied planes continued to attack the U-Boat, continuing to inflict massive damage which eventually forced her commander, Eckehard Wolf to scuttle her.

For his relentless bravery, Harmon and his crew were highly decorated, with Harmon receiving the US Distinguished Flying Cross, the British Distinguished Flying Cross, and the Soviet Order of Glory 3rd Class.

Though Harmon refused to wear his Soviet Award during his post war career due to the tensions of the Cold War, he continued to wear the ribbon until his retirement from the Navy in 1968. He would pass away in 1998, and would be buried with full military honors at the Calverton National Cemetery in New York.

This grouping features his: Theater Made Ribbons and Wings, Cap, original photographs, Command at Sea Badge, and his Uniform (not pictured), with the Ribbon bar having been prominently featured in the Dave Schwind book “Blue Seas, Red Stars”.

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