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WWII Footlockers


Roscoe16
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I am wondering if all US GI WWII footlockers were made of wood or were some made of metal? I have what is supposed to be my great uncle's footlocker which is all metal. He was in the US 6th Infantry Division in the Pacific. Any information would be appreciated.

 

Roscoe16

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I am wondering if all US GI WWII footlockers were made of wood or were some made of metal? I have what is supposed to be my great uncle's footlocker which is all metal. He was in the US 6th Infantry Division in the Pacific. Any information would be appreciated.

 

Roscoe16

 

I have seen many metal footlockers from WWII: I assume they were private purchase.

 

Take a look at this thread to see some of the many varieties: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...?showtopic=8681

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Not sure if this will help you since I cannot confirm the date on this one, but here is a non-wood footlocker. Could be WWII, could be from Korea. :dunno:

 

fl1.jpg

fl2.jpg

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Many were mfg from "fiberboard" , my Dads is one and IIRC have at least another used for storage. Other storage boxes such as file, field desks and Officers mess kit boxes also come to mind.

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Not sure if this will help you since I cannot confirm the date on this one, but here is a non-wood footlocker. Could be WWII, could be from Korea. :dunno:

 

fl1.jpg

fl2.jpg

 

This is a Post WWII Foot Locker as evidenced by the metal handles, WWII ones has leather handles. If I remember right these came out in 1948. Also it is made of wood it just has a fiber covering so you can't see the wood but it is there.

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Not sure if this helps but the three WW2 footlockers that I have are made of metal with leather handles and all exhibit the same characteristics so I doubt private purchase. All are from different vets and theaters and were purchased over the last 20 years.

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The one I have looks nothing like any of those you've all shown me. It is all dark green metal, including the tray. It has no actual attached handles on the ends, rather the metal is indented so you can grab hold of it. It has 2 hinges on the back and just one metal hasp on the front. I guess I need to post some pictures. It's buried under a bunch of stuff in the back of a closet, will be a chore to get at it. Thanks for all the info.

 

Roscoe16

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Keep in mind that everything that appears to be a foot locker and is passed off as one is not, many are actually equipment chests. Issue foot lockers are marked as such although the markings are often missing as is the case of the one pictured but if you look near the bottom edge in the picture of the top you will see two small dark spots, there will be a small hole in the center of these spots. This is where a small brass oval data plate was attached, it would have had the nomenclature and date. Trunk type foot locker plates were always in this position, if there is a data plate in the center of the top it was an equipment chest. The wooden foot lockers, which came in many configurations but most commonly made from plywood sheets have the nomenclature and date printed on the underside of the lid (easily removed or worn off). I have never seen or heard of a metal WWII foot locker and doubt they were made simply because steel and aluminum (and many other metals) were restricted items during the war which is one reason they went to the plywood type, they use less metal and were easier to make. This is not to say you won't find a metal chest but it is not a foot locker. You will find many non-issue foot locker and equipment chests with soldier's names and address painted on them, especially officers, because they were scrounged and used as shipping cases home or to their next duty station.

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