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M9A1 Rifle Grenade


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Hi all,

 

here is a little project I have been working on, on and of the last few weeks.

 

As you can see, this is an M9A1 rifle grenade wich is, if I may say so myself, in pretty good condition.

 

These are pretty rare, it seems, because I havent seen that many for sale.

 

I picked up this one in a very sorry state. It was pitted all over, and polished to hell. It was missing the fin assembly and safety.

 

This is it, after reconditioning...

 

post-132-1246222232.jpg

 

Regards,

Stijn

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A little story on two of these. A WWII vet gave me one he brought home and told me it was unloaded. We were in a car driving and he unscrewed the head and showed me it was unloaded. I was driving and just glanced at it and it appeared to be unloaded. I added it to one of my displays but about a year later I unscrewed the head and saw a silver thing in the middle of the inside of the head. When I looked closer I could see that it was a primer sitting on top of black cone molded powder charge. The primer was on the tip of the powder cone with the powder widening toward the front of the head and was hard to see. The head looked empty unless you looked close. Being in law enforcement I called our bomb squad to dispose of it to give them some practice.

2nd story, I was at a military show and a guy was selling one he had on his table. I asked him if it was unloaded and he said it was. I unsrewed the head and you guessed it, it was loaded. He said he had checked it.

 

If any one runs accoss one of these, please be cautious as they appear to be unloaded unless you shine a light into the head to make sure.

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No worries here.

 

Mine has a drilled hole inside. The cone shape is still there, but it is empty.

 

Regards,

Stijn

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If any one runs across one of these, please be cautious as they appear to be unloaded unless you shine a light into the head to make sure.
Ray makes an excellent point here. We’ve all heard horror stories of people who have been shot by “unloaded” guns. Others no doubt have been hurt or killed my “inert” ordnance that wasn’t correctly checked. I strongly suggest everyone here should read this thread.

As for the rifle grenades themselves, I recall when I was much younger, they were actually quite easy to find. I agree that they’ve largely dried up now. I still have one (a black painted training one) that either myself or my brother got from a mail order house. It’s got postwar markings and I plan on re-painting it eventually. Like most of us, I wish I’d gotten a couple more while the getting was good.

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Thanks for the heads up, Tim.

 

Some were marked, some were not. If I decide to mark it, I'll make a template myself. I like doing that sort of thing.

 

Stijn

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cone shaped thing you say? :huh:

 

Silver thing-a-ma-bob you say? :fear:

 

boom.jpg

 

This is one of the black M11A3 practice rifle grenades, at least the top portion is anyway. The tail fins on this one are from a M19A1 correct? The cone in this one doesn't look like powder, it looks like lightly pitted metal and the sliver fuse looks to be filed/ground down. Very visible scratch marks on it.

 

m11.jpg

 

What say ye? :think:

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Cone shaped thing you say? :huh:

 

Silver thing-a-ma-bob you say? :fear:

 

boom.jpg

 

This is one of the black M11A3 practice rifle grenades, at least the top portion is anyway. The tail fins on this one are from a M19A1 correct? The cone in this one doesn't look like powder, it looks like lightly pitted metal and the sliver fuse looks to be filed/ground down. Very visible scratch marks on it.

 

m11.jpg

 

What say ye? :think:

 

That is not an M11A3 that is an M9A1 that has been painted black at one time. The cone is metal and is designed to form the explosives for a shaped charge effect. The M11A1 thru A4 series of practice grenades have a removable cone assembly and fin assembly. This one appears from the photos at least to be fixed like the M9A1 AT Rifle Grenade.

 

From the photos, this one appears to be totally inert.

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That is not an M11A3 that is an M9A1 that has been painted black at one time. The cone is metal and is designed to form the explosives for a shaped charge effect. The M11A1 thru A4 series of practice grenades have a removable cone assembly and fin assembly. This one appears from the photos at least to be fixed like the M9A1 AT Rifle Grenade.

 

From the photos, this one appears to be totally inert.

 

Thank you for the information Latewatch, glad to hear my fancy tin can is safe.

 

keymaker: No, it is not for sale—in fact I just bought it myself. :w00t:

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Dirt Detective
Cone shaped thing you say? :huh:

 

Silver thing-a-ma-bob you say? :fear:

 

 

The cone in this one doesn't look like powder, it looks like lightly pitted metal and the sliver fuse looks to be filed/ground down. Very visible scratch marks on it.

 

 

What say ye? :think:

 

Hi mrhell,

The cone shaped thing is just what you think..its a brass or other metal shaped in a cone which makes it a hollow or shaped charge. Above the cone ( the area you see when you look in) would be filled with 4oz. of pentolite, that cone gives it the destructive power. This one is empty..the scratches are just scratches from digging the powder out.

The fuze train starts in the hollow tube that screws into the head. See the attached pic that explains it better than I can write it. If the detonator (D) and booster (E) are not in the tube..this is INERT. Do you have a pic of that area?

When the grenade strikes a target the pin moves forward to activatethe detonator which activates the booster and then the pentolite charge. The shaped cone gives it the armor penetrating qualities.

post-2677-1247586391.jpg

post-2677-1247586411.jpg

post-2677-1247586426.jpg

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Thank you for the information Latewatch, glad to hear my fancy tin can is safe.

 

keymaker: No, it is not for sale—in fact I just bought it myself. :w00t:

 

That is a really nice looking one you picked up. I came across it shortly AFTER to bought it. You're lucky I did not see it first ;) .

 

Tim

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DIRT DETECTIVE: Thanks a bunch for the information! Could you please tell me what TM manual you referenced? Anywho, we here at the mrhell household can sleep sound; the detonator (D) and booster (E) do not seem to be there. As the picture below shows, the only part visible in the base is the firing pin ( C ), which is loose and rattles when the base is shaken.

:bravo:

 

rg-bottom.jpg

 

 

 

TSELLATI: Thank you for the comment. "A day late and a dollar short" is normal protocol for me, however we all have "right place at the right time" moments. :naughty:

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Dirt Detective
DIRT DETECTIVE: Thanks a bunch for the information! Could you please tell me what TM manual you referenced? Anywho, we here at the mrhell household can sleep sound; the detonator (D) and booster (E) do not seem to be there. As the picture below shows, the only part visible in the base is the firing pin ( C ), which is loose and rattles when the base is shaken.

:bravo:

 

rg-bottom.jpg

TSELLATI: Thank you for the comment. "A day late and a dollar short" is normal protocol for me, however we all have "right place at the right time" moments. :naughty:

 

 

Great pic..looks like that is the detonator housing..you can take needle nose pliers and unsrew that part..it should come out. My refrence is the book " The american Arsenal" by Ian Hogg standard ord. catalog of small arms, tanks, armored cars, artillery, AA guns, ammo, grenades, mines..

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