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2nd ranger helmet, how to paint.


cigardave
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i have seen decals listed for sale on the internet. did they use decals like that in ww2? should i? or would it be better to get some paint and do it with a brush? if i do paint it, do i just use a flat finish enamel? also, what was the standard size of the dimand? or was there

 

http://www.military-steel-helmets-and-deca...ndrangers_4.jpg

 

this is what im wanting to achieve

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Back in the day I believe they were all painted and there was no "standard" that was achieved. Many different people painted their helmets under different conditions and varying skill levels back then. I would make yours look just like your picture and you would be fine. Once painted you may want to tone the paint and the helmet down by weathering, abrading, and staining to make it look like it was not painted yesterday. Regards, Chris

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The decals are OK if your just going to display your helmet as some kind of representative piece but, if your planning on reenacting, the decals will not hold up. As was mentioned by Chris, these insignia were all painted during WWII.

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Why not just buy a good repro helmet instead of destroying yet another unmarked helmet?

Toppots have good ones for example.

 

Erwin

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88th338thpfccor

I have added a couple of M1's to my collection and what I did was buy a decal of the Company I needed and used it as a guide or stencil. You can pick one up rather inexpensive, lets say the 2nd Rangers. Then purchased the colors of paint at a hobby store and painted it to match the decal, size and color on the helmet. Mike

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  • 2 months later...
giconceptsjw

Instead of using a copy of a 2nd Ranger helmet as your inspiration, maybe you should use an original. You show a pic of a recently painted (and very obviously fake) Ranger helmet with “this is what I’d like to achieve”. Do you really want a shiny fake looking Ranger helmet? Try looking for images of original Ranger helmets actually used in Normandy. Militaria Magazine has featured a few nice ones. BTW, the helmets were all painted by hand originally and they were not done with perfect crisp clean edges and absolutely perfectly shaped numbers like that. Take a look at an original one and you’ll see. Good advice for everyone; please don’t try to make copies from a copy, no matter what it is. Always find an image of an original example to use as your inspiration for your copy.

 

JW

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giconceptsjw

PS, I don’t personally own an original painted Ranger helmet but I understand the number “2” was actually done in dark blue paint, not black. The Ranger diamond shoulder patch was a dark blue background with orange/yellow letters. For better visibility, they just reversed the colors for the helmet markings (orange/yellow background with dark blue numbers). I would try to get a good look at an original before I started painting anything.

 

JW

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Thank you.

I just found a couple of images of helmets were stated "original", and I use them to find out the correct font to replicate it. So I created the mask with pdf.

In the same pdf I also added the possible 5th bn, but the number "5" doesn't match with any of the two "original" fonts reported in the images I found over internet.

 

The helmet is interesting. I bought it 20 years ago from a Vietnam veteran. He sold it as Vietnam era. In fact the internal liner is absolutely not wwii. But I discovered the external shell it should be wwii because of the front seam (according to atthefront.com explanation).

 

I wonder if you can suggest how I can better check if my helmet is a fake or not.

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giconceptsjw

The thing to remember about helmets is, they made millions of front seam, fixed bail helmets in WWII. These were still in the system for many years after WWII. Many thousands of WWII helmets were still in use in the 1950’s & 1960’s. It’s really not uncommon to see 1950’s or 60’s organizational markings painted on WWII helmets simply because they were still being used at the time. There’s no need to be confused about WWII style helmets with post WWII liners or markings on them. They were used like that for many years and back then, a helmet was a helmet. No one cared at all what style it was or when it was made.

 

It can be hard to tell what is fake and what’s not. If you’ve had something for 20 plus years, chances are it wasn’t painted up by a re-enactor before that. There’s no sure fire way to determine exactly when something was painted on a helmet.

 

From my experience and talking to veterans, most say painting formation markings on helmets was a job that was given out as a punishment. Instead of enjoying a weekend pass, these guys had to stay on post and paint markings on a few hundred helmets. Most of the time they didn’t use stencils and it was all done freehand so no two were exactly the same. Some are nicely done, some look like the artwork of a 3 year old. In some cases, the men were told to put markings on their own helmets individually. Either way, they didn’t use computer generated masks for perfect lines.

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I have re-read the posts. Probably there is a misunderstanding. The picture visible at that page IS the helmet I have personally painted by using those masks created by me (I'm the webmaster of that site).

So that helmet IS a fake in the sense that I did it by myself.

 

I misunderstood you were just talking about the helmet itself, sorry. :)

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  • 1 month later...

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