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WW1 SHREVE & Co wing


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Hi all I thought you might be interested in this wing since a similar wing is currently being discussed in the Campbell collection.

 

The wing has has a die struck front which is attached to a back plate. The U.S. appear to be 14K gold and are die struck and then attached to the shield. You will notice there are 3 vent holes (they allow gas to escape) on the reverse which are needed due to the fact that the two halfs are soldered together.

 

Enjoy

John

 

shreve1s.jpg

 

shreve2.jpg

Always looking for Wings & Named Air Medals!

Motto: To Collect, Preserve, and Remember!

 

 

 

 

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From American Silver Marks

 

http://www.silvercollecting.com/silvermarksS.html

Incorporated in 1894, Shreve & Co. traces their roots to a jewelry store in San Francisco in 1852. This firm manufactured 5 different flatware patterns, Dolores, Fourteenth Century, Louis XVI, Mary Louise, Napoleonic and Norman.

 

This type of wing is close to unique in that instead striking wings from a solid planchet (like a medal or coin), Shreve struck them using a process very similar to producing hollow-ware. By doing so they were able to create one of the most beautiful wings of WW1. The hollow-ware process, like the handle of a silver knife, involves a relatively thin shell that because of it's thin structure is able to pressed into very high-relief and detail. Any weakness inherent in the thin shell is overcome by soldering the thin front-piece to the relatively thick back.

 

Beautiful example of this wonderful wing.

 

Chris

 

Reason for edit: Corrected factual error (thanks Joe)

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Thanks Chirs for the expanded and better explaination of how this wonderful wing was made.

 

John

Always looking for Wings & Named Air Medals!

Motto: To Collect, Preserve, and Remember!

 

 

 

 

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donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

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Here is some interesting information from the Shreve & Co web site.

 

When World War I broke out, Shreve & Co. was converted to war production, manufacturing airplane parts for the government. The silversmiths were instructed on how to handle sledge hammers, rather than the delicate instruments of the jewelry-making trade. At the war's end, Shreve & Co. quickly went back to producing luxury goods.

Always looking for Wings & Named Air Medals!

Motto: To Collect, Preserve, and Remember!

 

 

 

 

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

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Chris

 

Isn't the front panel still a die strike? I know hollow-ware can be made by shaping over a mold such as bowl or teapot. But in the case of this wing the front would have been struck to obtain the detail and then soldered to the back plate. I know that two part knifes in some cases are struck and then the two parts soldered together.

 

Joe

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Chris

 

Isn't the front panel still a die strike? I know hollow-ware can be made by shaping over a mold such as bowl or teapot. But in the case of this wing the front would have been struck to obtain the detail and then soldered to the back plate. I know that two part knifes in some cases are struck and then the two parts soldered together.

 

Joe

 

Joe,

 

Oh absolutely! I am sorry for not being more clear. The top panel is clearly die struck, and the wing is made as you say; in a similar fashion to the handle of a fine cutlery knife. No doubt the silversmiths of Shreve & Co adapted the procedures and skills they were most familiar with to make this wing. I don't believe that I have ever encountered another WW1 era wing that is manufactured exactly the same way.

 

You of course know better than most here the physics involved in the die stamping process. The cliche' process (thin stamping) lends itself to high detail and relief, but the relatively thin sheets and hollow strike involved are inherently less strong than a solid planchet. BB&B and other makers of the "Dallas" type wing affixed their thin, cliche'-struck wings to a cloth covered brass backing plate. This served to strengthen it some, but the number of broken right tip "Dallas" wings attests to this weakness. Shreve seems to have solved this problem by soldering the cliche' struck face to a solid silver back (like the two pieces of a cutlery knife handle).

 

At any rate, I didn't mean to indicate that it was made by hand hammering over a mold... Thanks for clearing up any confusion.

 

I guess my point is that there is a certain qualitative difference to the hollow-ware style of strike that makes this particular wing very attractive.

 

Best!

 

Chris

767409605_sigcustom3.png.e95257302e2a500ba241cd8cdc44ff0c.png

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