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Crash photo, plane id?


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I picked up a few odd photos from a local sale of a vet who had flown H-19's among other planes. This photo was among them and is unmarked. The tail number is 492075. Anyone recognize what type of A/C?

post-3685-1241136762.jpg

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Here is one of the H-19 pics. Written on the back is H-19A 9/1953 43rd Air rescue McCord AFB.

post-3685-1241137275.jpg

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That would be my guess also. I need to research the number. Here are some flak damage photos that were with the group. I haven't figured out what a/c this is either.

 

post-3685-1241137920.jpg

post-3685-1241137966.jpg

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That hole in the wing musta felt like they were hit with a VW bus! fear.gif

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...Here are some flak damage photos that were with the group. I haven't figured out what a/c this is either...

 

post-3685-1241138047.jpg

The second aircraft might be a shot-up B-26 Invader during the Korean War. Compare the first close up in post #5 with this image of an entire bird showing a long shot of the same area.

 

post-1963-1241139831.jpg

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Lee Ragan
Scratch my initial comment, that's a B-36 tail. Details of the crash in British Columbia can be found here:

 

http://www.7bwb-36assn.org/b36genhistpg2.html

I agree, it's B-36. Note the radome protruding at the tail which would fit a B-36 as the gunner remotely controlled the tail turret from the pressureized gunners station amid-ships. The B-29 tail turret was not configured like this.

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...tail number is 492075. Anyone recognize what type of A/C?

post-3685-1241136762.jpg

The mystery of B-36B 44-92075 is a very interesting story (link here and here). And a very nice find, Walt.

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Thanks for the links. That is a more interesting and tragic story than I had hoped to find out. Here is an uncropped view of the photo. It looks to be pretty far up in the mountains.

post-3685-1241225759.jpg

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Here is one last photo that was with the other. It looks to be 4 Air Force men on horseback. Possibly the recovery team?

post-3685-1241226107.jpg

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Here is one last photo that was with the other. It looks to be 4 Air Force men on horseback. Possibly the recovery team?

post-3685-1241226107.jpg

I just saw something on TV about this crash, wish I remembered what channel/show....

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  • 7 months later...
Stinger Gunner USMC
The mystery of B-36B 44-92075 is a very interesting story (link here and here). And a very nice find, Walt.

The pilot of the B-36 in your photo was Captain Harold L Barry. This aircraft was the first ever to be lost with an atomic load. Barry was killed in a mid-air collision in 1951 with 13 of his crew when an F-51D collided with his B-36 directly behind the cockpit. Barry graduated with my grandfather and I have Barry's uniforms and several personal items that I puchased from his widow's estate sale in the mid 90s. After Christmas I will start a new thread on Barry's career

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...The pilot of the B-36 in your photo was Captain Harold L Barry...After Christmas I will start a new thread on Barry's career...

Thanks, Stinger, for calling out the connection between Capt. Barry and the crashes of B-36B 44-92075 on February 12, 1950, and B-36D 49-2658 on April 27, 1951. What an astonishing coincidence. And, speaking of coincidence, did you notice that the leader of the flight of P-51s involved in the 49-2658 crash was Capt. Robinson Risner, later a Korean War Ace (eight MiG kills), Vietnam War POW, and two-time winner of the Air Force Cross? Looking forward to seeing your Barry collection and the story of his career.

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  • 9 years later...
InvaderHistoricalFoundatio

That would be my guess also. I need to research the number. Here are some flak damage photos that were with the group. I haven't figured out what a/c this is either.

 

attachicon.gifflak1.jpg

attachicon.gifflak2.jpg

 

 

 

These images are definitely from an A-26 Invader, called the B-26 in Korea. They were known for low-level night interdiction missions and took a hell of a lot of flak damage. The zero-point rocket launchers under the wing, as well as the light, wing dihedral and overall shape are a dead giveaway.

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