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H&H Naval Aviation Observers (Navigation) wing


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Wing badges aren't my main area of collecting, so I'd like to get some second opinions on this 1945 - 1947 H&H Naval Aviation Observers (Navigation) wing. It's die-struck, multipiece riveted construction with clutch backs. The incised hallmark is sharp and even. What I don't like about the wing is that the clutch posts are slightly longer than I'm used to seeing on WWII vintage badges, and the compass rose is slightly off center. Comparing it to the clutch backed H&H example illustrated on page 97 of Willis and Carmichael's United States Navy Wings of Gold book, the finish looks shinier, and the hallmark and rivet are different. Any thoughts? Vintage wing or repro? Thanks in advance!

 

 

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As John said a keeper. But I want to add a note to help all of you in the future. A technical note.

 

Look closely at the junction of the post and wing. You will see a touch of silver color. That is where the post is soldered onto to the wing. Using real solder and not an electrostatic weld. When you see 1/10 or 1/20 GF that means a layer gold 1/10 or 1/20th of the weight of the base metal was pressed onto that base metal as a layer. When you solder you burn off the gold layer at the the junction and get the solder to show.

 

Is this always true of all WWII or later wings, no but most of the time. Most of the makers back then did real soldering.

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As John said a keeper. But I want to add a note to help all of you in the future. A technical note.

 

Look closely at the junction of the post and wing. You will see a touch of silver color. That is where the post is soldered onto to the wing. Using real solder and not an electrostatic weld. When you see 1/10 or 1/20 GF that means a layer gold 1/10 or 1/20th of the weight of the base metal was pressed onto that base metal as a layer. When you solder you burn off the gold layer at the the junction and get the solder to show.

 

Is this always true of all WWII or later wings, no but most of the time. Most of the makers back then did real soldering.

 

Thanks for the technical information Joe... I for one like these type of details.

 

John

Always looking for Wings & Named Air Medals!

Motto: To Collect, Preserve, and Remember!

 

 

 

 

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