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WWI 45 Auto Ammo, Brass or Steel Case?


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I have seen some of the ammo used in WWII for the M1911 45 auto with steel instead of brass cases. I was wondering if anyone has pictures of the ammo used in or around 1918. Were the cases made of steel and were there headstamps with the year?

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I have seen some of the ammo used in WWII for the M1911 45 auto with steel instead of brass cases. I was wondering if anyone has pictures of the ammo used in or around 1918. Were the cases made of steel and were there headstamps with the year?

 

Steel cases were not used until WW2. WW1 production was all brass cased. They were headstamped with maker and date as in WW2.

 

Some of the contracts were: Frankford Arsenal, Peters Cartridge Company, Remington-Union Metallic Cartridge, United States Cartridge Company, and Winchester.

 

45acp1918.jpg

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Thanks for those outstanding pictures, bayonetman. Did all of those cartridges in the picture have lead bullets as opposed to having the copper full metal jacket? Or was that even available at that time period?

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The photo does show a silvery looking bullet but it is jacketed. Early bullet jackets were made of cupronickel and these have a silvery appearance. This was later changed to the copper colored gilding metal, early production of which was given a thin tin wash which has a close resemblance to the cupronickel jacket. But the military issue combat bullet was always jacketed.

 

I can't offhand remember when the change from cupronickel was made on this cartridge, the change in rifle ammunition wasn't made until the 1920s, but I seem to recall that it was made earlier on the pistol bullet. But all original WW1 issue .45 ACP ammunition had the silvery colored bullet jacket, whether cupronickel or tinned gilding metal I am not sure.

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Thanks again for the info. Now I will have to search through all of my older military brass to see what headstamps that I have. I do have some round nose lead bullets that I have cast. and some kind of older (possibly Herters) convex brass looking primers. I might be able to make up some reloads to look similar to original. I have no intent of firing them in ANY pistol, much less my 1918 original Black Army M1911. Thanks again for that Info.

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One more thing, Bayonetman, if I may ask. Your picture of the 1918 ammo shows one that has a small line around the almost middle of the brass, as if that were to designate how far the bullet needed to be seated. Do all of the 1918 cartridges have that? It would make it much easier to find while searching through all of my empty brass. I hope you are still watching this thread.

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Yes, all of them have the seating cannelure. These are in the same order as shown in the original photo.

 

I also noted that two of them have (second and fifth) have the tinned plating worn off the bullet showing the gilding metal jacket under the plating.

 

45WW1JPG.jpg

Ribbons 07-14

PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER, SADLY, HAS PASSED AWAY

Please click here to read the tributes to Gary:

 


 

 

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