Jump to content

store bought foods to use as K-rations or C-rations?


Recommended Posts

Here in the UK ye can buy for the:

 

C ration:

tins of spaghetti bolognese, and meat and sausage from a company called Lidl's, they are less than £1, also ye can meat and veg stew, and corned beef hash from most stores..these are good for the C rations, though the tins are taller than original... Having said that, there was a short period where the C rat tins where that size, but a very short period...

Also, ye can get wafer biscuits, which are almost identical to the C biscuits...

In France ye can get he sugar tablets which are good for the C rats, but also for the K ration...Ye can get Domino tablets in the US (I once had to send for some)...

Any plain wrapped candy/boiled sweets will do... Print out and wrap with "Domino" label...

Lemon powder, I had to get from British Army rations, modern, and re wrap...

 

10in1, 5in1, Mountain:

Carnation tins of evaporated milk, the large ones and small ones..the small ones (which I have reproduced and shown here) came in most rations, including the 10in1, 5in1...

Canned roast beef, which conform almost exactly to the original, ye get from the £1 shop local...

"Pork Luncheon Meat" which is just Spam, from ANY supermarket store, just re-label...

Everything else ye see in my photos, I make from scratch, and put contents in, or leave empty if used for display...

Ye can, if ye want, use "Dorito" crackers for the K biscuits, their already sealed wrapped in grops of three, or four...

 

K Ration:

The meat unit (can) is not so easy, ye can get the round spam tins, as well as processed cheese, but they are taller than original, and the processed cheese gave me a headache (lol), so i just use "Spam Spreadables" paint the sides gold, and remove ringpull from and then label the top... Ohh, for the nearest in size, I buy the Salmon tins, and re-label, but their not good for eating, only display as Salmon (indeed Tuna) was NOT in the K or C ration in WWII...

Sugar tablets, already explained...

Chewing gum, someone already explained...

Biscuits, ye can get those Italian crackers (Dorito), but their too long, ok for "in the field" but not for display, so I bake my own, and shrink wrap, good for display only...

For the beverage, I print on silver paper, as the coffee was wrapped in foil, but the problem is with the lemon and bouilon, they where wrapped in cellophane type stuff....

 

 

It's real easy to make authentic looking rations to eat, and takes very little effort, and with the expense and time taken for detail by people in their impressions, I feel this is at times much forsaken and there is no real excuse, unless you really feel ye need to...

 

then, there's field kitchen displays...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Serial Bars did NOT come in Wartime K rations folks.... :thumbdown:

 

Here's a good guideline from the QMC:

Scan0128.jpg

 

EDIT: Yep, have it here in front of me, C.Q.D No, 28H, 31 August 1945.... Compressed Cereal bar... ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is offered for whatever it may be worth. When my uncle returned from WWII, USMC Tarawa and Siapan, my mother fixed him a lunch his first day home. She fixed spam and fruit salad, a treat because they were non-existant during the war. My uncle turned up his nose at the meal and told her that her had been living on spam and fruit salad for years and didn't want any more now that he was home. As for the crackers, Carrs dinner crackers would be a good substitute for the John Wayne crackers. Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found the pork luncheon loaf cans at family dollar for.....$1.00!!! Same size and all....rip off the label and paint. And,hey I loved chopped eggs and ham c's........

Sparrow

Link to post
Share on other sites
VP_Association
I pick up my K Ration boxes from Ebay. Make sure you get the ones printed on Chipboard. pjdemon is a seller I get mine from and I'm satisfied with the quality of his boxes.

 

As for the foods... For the K-1 and K-2 buscuits I use Club crackers and graham crackers, package them four or five to a pack and seal them in shrink wrap. For the main entree I use Tuna (not issued in WWII I know, but have you tried to find the ham and eggs or cheese spread in a like sized can?) Ham chunks or chicken chunks I pick up the off brands as they usually are still sealed in cans without pull tops. For Corned beef, Kroger brand is my choice as it still utilizes the key to open the can. As far as spam, yes, any brand will do, just print out a black and white pork luncheon meat label and affix it to the can, pull top down if you can't find non pull top cans. www.candycrate.com has Charms candies in the modern packaging, but its easy to open the pack, re-wrap them in brown waxed or craft paper and relabel them with a period wrapper. Gum is the same. While you are there at candy crate, you can pick up plenty of period gums... Blackjack, clove, teaberry and Beeman's. Look around on the groups that deal with paperwork and you should be able to print out gum wrappers. Cigarettes and matches... I print out the boxes and match covers from the aforementioned groups and cut the filter ends off of the cheapest cigs I can find. For the matches remember the matches that came with the K Rations only had one rake of matches (10) not the modern 20 per... pull the staple and separate the rakes and make two WWII packs for each modern one. Fruit bars: I use whatever I can get my hands on as far as the cereal bars and again, wrap them in printed wrappers from the repop paperwork groups. Same thing with the cereal bars. For those I use the Quaker chewy granola bars. I would wrap the cereal and fruit bars in saran wrap before sealing them in the paper wrappers to keep them fresher and to keep the oils and such from bleeding through the paper.

 

Now for the D Rations.... Yummy yummy D Rations!!! I make my own!!! Yes, I make my own D Rations so they are edible and I seal them in shrink wrap before sealing them in boxes. There are a number of places that sell them for like three or four bucks a pop (the boxes), but if you go to Hobby Lobby, you can find Value pack note cards in the brown cardstock that looks like a light weight chipboard and will fit through a printer. I print my own boxes this way and assemble them myself.

 

The following recipie is for one D Ration. Figure out how many you want to make, and adjust the measurements accordingly.

 

These are the measurements for the 4 oz D Bar:

 

4 ounce D-Ration bar: 3-7/8" long x 2-1/4" wide x 7/8" tall. The two long sides are tilted in at about a 10 degree angle, so the bar is narrower at the top than at the bottom. The short notches are 1-1/4" from each end and the long notch runs down the middle of the bar. They are 1/8" deep, cut in the shape of a "V". A V-shaped file works good to make this groove

 

I've found that a 9 cell mini bread pan works best for these. Just make a tick mark about 7/8" from the bottom on the side of each cell so you can judge how thick they will be.

 

You will need a double boiler to heat the mixture. You do not want direct heat to scorch the chocolate (or your wife's good cook pot). This recipie I found on the net somewhere, but it works! I've used hershey's chocolate bars and milk chocolate cookie makin morsels, and currently I have several slabs of chocolate ready for my next patch. The slabs you might be able to get from the baking section of your grocery.

 

Here is recipe I found on how to make your own. Enjoy.

 

Here’s how you make,

 

D Rations, D Rations yummy yummy D Rations. All right so they the

ration of last resort, but at least they kind’ a keep your tummy full

and if you use my recipe they don’t taste too bad. What I have done is

take the original recipe and modify it a little considering we’re like

60 years later. First off the list of ingredients to make 1 D Ration.

 

3 oz of Hershey’s Milk Chocolate chips or chunks.

 

1 oz of Table Sugar

 

1/3 oz of Nonfat Dry Milk

 

3 table spoons Oat Flour

 

2 to 4 drops Vanilla Extract

 

Paraffin Wax as needed (Gulf canning wax works fine it helps raise the melting temperature of the finished bars) OR Cocoa butter

 

1 D Ration mold (9 Cell mini bread pan with each cell close to the appropriate dmiension of a 4 oz bar)

 

All of these ingredients are available at any grocery store. Ok here’s

how to cook it up.

 

First measure out the table sugar, nonfat dry milk and oat flour and

put them into a food processor or blender. Now mix it up until you

have a fine powder. The reason for doing this is that if you don’t you

will get a D Ration that is really gritty when you eat it. Also, it

makes it easier to mix with the chocolate later.

 

You need a double boiler; it can be nothing more than a smaller pan

that sits in a larger pan that has water in it. The thing is you need

to heat the mixture from the boiling water not from the stove,

otherwise you will burn the chocolate. Place the chocolate into the

double boiler and melt it the best you can until you get a smooth

mixture. I have found that I have to add some paraffin wax to get the

chocolate to melt into a smooth mixture. Don’t add any more than you

have to. Also, here is a tip from Hershey’s. When melting the

chocolate add a drop or two to it. The trick is that it keeps the oils

mixing and will help keep the melting temperature up and will last

longer in the heat.

 

Once the chocolate and wax is melted add in one half of the ground up

sugar, milk and oat flour. Mix it up as best you can and then add a

teaspoon or so to the mixture. This will allow you to get the mixture

to a consistency that allows you mix it all together. Once you get it

mixed add the other half of the ground stuff and add another teaspoon

or so of wax (or cocoa butter) to get it to mix up.

 

One thing you will notice is that as the mixture sets under heat in the

boiler, the water will start to separate out. Don’t worry about it, it

mixes back in just fine. Now let the mixture cook for about 10

minutes. Give it a good stir every minute or so.

 

Now it’s ready to pour into the mold, but first give it one last good

stir. Pour into the mold and then put everything into the freezer.

Let sit until it is good and cold. Remove from the freezer and then

remove from the mold and let it heat up to room temperature. Cut the indentations with

a sharp knife of V File and you got a D Ration.

 

What you end up with is a hard block that will crumble up with a little

effort, just like the original. Unlike the original, at least from

what I have read, the taste is pretty good considering and is entirely

eatable. I would however, following the original instructions and eat

it slowly. Wrap it up and put in a Repo D Ration box and you are good

to go.

 

Now the answer to the finial question, will it melt in my pocket like

the chocolate bars that I have been using? Well I have taken my

mixture to 150 Deg F and it got a little soft, but did not melt. Well

what do you want? The original were only rated to 125 Deg.

Hope this answers your questions... I have eaten my own rations many times at events. Even the d Rations, and I use them for my Ration display when I do living history displays as well. I have had WWII Vets ask me where I got the old K Rations and it floored them when I told them I made them myself.

 

Wayne

 

Don't use parrafin wax if you are reproducing D rations, take the time to find cocoa butter instead. Its not expensive and here's where you can buy it on line: http://www.nutsonline.com/nuts/cacao/raw-butter.html.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't use parrafin wax if you are reproducing D rations, take the time to find cocoa butter instead. Its not expensive and here's where you can buy it on line: http://www.nutsonline.com/nuts/cacao/raw-butter.html.

 

What does it do to the melting point of the bar once it's done? Last summer I had some of mine out in indiana in 90 degree heat and they got just a little soft. Up to about 80 or so they stay firm and can be crumbled with a little effort. I agree the cocoa butter would make it more edible, but the melting point needs to be a bit high. Originals were rated to 120 degrees F I believe.

 

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites
VP_Association
What does it do to the melting point of the bar once it's done? Last summer I had some of mine out in indiana in 90 degree heat and they got just a little soft. Up to about 80 or so they stay firm and can be crumbled with a little effort. I agree the cocoa butter would make it more edible, but the melting point needs to be a bit high. Originals were rated to 120 degrees F I believe.

 

Wayne

 

I can't speak to what it does to the melting point, but I do know that the original QMC recipe for the D Bar included cocoa butter, not parrafin wax. The oat flour, I believe, is the component of the recipe that's supposed to retard melting. I think the cocoa butter, which is a form of fat, was there for its caloric value. It may interest you to know that the earliest test recipes included a small amount of kerosine! The intent was to produce an off-taste so soldiers in the field would not use the D Bars as candy! By the time the D Bars went into mass production though the Kerosine had been removed from the recipe. Here's a guy who sells replica edible D Bars that he claims are made using an adaptation of the original recipe. I've bought them from him and I've been impressed. Check them out at http://home.comcast.net/~milprodco/rations.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites
VP_Association

One more thing. If you are going to try to reproduce D Bars be sure to use a water-filled double boiler to melt the chocolate. Don't attempt to melt it a pan placed directly on a stove heating element. If you do this, you'll burn the chocolate. I ruined my first attempt that way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made some D-rations last year and they turned out okay. I'll have to try the cocoa butter next time and see how they are. They only thing I need is a correct mold and I'm good to go!

 

 

Nick Hopper

Link to post
Share on other sites
I made some D-rations last year and they turned out okay. I'll have to try the cocoa butter next time and see how they are. They only thing I need is a correct mold and I'm good to go!

Nick Hopper

 

I use a 9 cell mini bread pan for my mold. The original bars were 7/8" thick so you would either have to mark the pan or eyeball it for the proper thickness. I got my pans from Hobby lobby for about $10...

 

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites
I use a 9 cell mini bread pan for my mold. The original bars were 7/8" thick so you would either have to mark the pan or eyeball it for the proper thickness. I got my pans from Hobby lobby for about $10...

 

Wayne

 

Thanks! I'll give that a try. We just got a Hobby Lobby in Spokane.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's another source for reproduction D Bars and other field rations:

 

http://www.historicreproductions.com/cat_rations1.htm

 

"This reproduction K Ration is based on extensive research primarily provided by QMC Historical Studies, The Development of Special Rations for the Army, September 1944"

 

And then produces K rations with sugar cubes*, P38 can opener**, and wooden spoon in "mid War" box...

 

I'm going to wear an M43 jacket in my 1941 impression... :think: :thumbdown:

 

 

* They had sugar tablets, not cubes...

 

** Never, ever, ever, ever, came in the K ration...

 

Also, Toilet paper replaced the sugar tablets in the SUPPER package in the summer of 1943, extra tablets being inserted into the BREAKFAST, and DINNER packages to compensate...

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the D-bar was a mixture of chocolate, oatmeal and some other things. I know somebody on the ww2 reenactors forum has a recipe to make them. Spam was issued during ww2, but the labels were different and the cans used to open with a key. You can find files to print out your own Spam labels on the ww2 reenactors forum. I think Club crackers are better to use then Ritz since they are similar to the ones that came in K -rations.

 

 

Chocolate and wax

Link to post
Share on other sites
"This reproduction K Ration is based on extensive research primarily provided by QMC Historical Studies, The Development of Special Rations for the Army, September 1944"

 

And then produces K rations with sugar cubes*, P38 can opener**, and wooden spoon in "mid War" box...

 

I'm going to wear an M43 jacket in my 1941 impression... :think: :thumbdown:

* They had sugar tablets, not cubes...

 

** Never, ever, ever, ever, came in the K ration...

 

Also, Toilet paper replaced the sugar tablets in the SUPPER package in the summer of 1943, extra tablets being inserted into the BREAKFAST, and DINNER packages to compensate...

 

The tablets were about the size of two cubes. I replicate them by wrapping up two cubes in a printed wrapper to approximate the size of the tablets. There was also boxed sugar that came in a solid slab about the size of ten cubes (5x2). I replicate this by printing and folding the box, then placing ten cubes in and sealing it up.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites
The tablets were about the size of two cubes. I replicate them by wrapping up two cubes in a printed wrapper to approximate the size of the tablets. There was also boxed sugar that came in a solid slab about the size of ten cubes (5x2). I replicate this by printing and folding the box, then placing ten cubes in and sealing it up.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Wayne

 

No they're not, at least UK size of sugar cubes anyway, it's like saying yer gonna take lard rump guy and cram him in a waist 29inch pair of trousers, but actually put him in a size 40 waste and say it's size 29 waist, get my drift....

 

Plus, the sugar "block" as ye say (and per my link in illustration from the QWMC itself), came in 1945, and if ye want I'll find out "EXACTLY when" by the specs and DEDUCTION as and when it became available, which would probably be Post War in any case...

 

Again,will I wear an M43 jacket in my M41 North Africa US Army impression, yeah :thumbsup: or :thumbdown: Take yer pick.... respectfully (except those who insist on being farbs)...

Link to post
Share on other sites
No they're not, at least UK size of sugar cubes anyway, it's like saying yer gonna take lard rump guy and cram him in a waist 29inch pair of trousers, but actually put him in a size 40 waste and say it's size 29 waist, get my drift....

 

Plus, the sugar "block" as ye say (and per my link in illustration from the QWMC itself), came in 1945, and if ye want I'll find out "EXACTLY when" by the specs and DEDUCTION as and when it became available, which would probably be Post War in any case...

 

Again,will I wear an M43 jacket in my M41 North Africa US Army impression, yeah :thumbsup: or :thumbdown: Take yer pick.... respectfully (except those who insist on being farbs)...

 

A careful read of my statement will show the use of the word "about" not "exactly the size of".... If you look at the chart showing the different components of the K Rations you will see that cubes were used in the Parachute ration, and switched to the tablets afterwards. Looking at the chart, the tablets actually were approximately the same size as two cubes... maybe just a little larger, and yes, the blocks were introduced in the 1945 time frame so wouldn't be suitable for a mid war impression let's say. Keeping in mind that we don't have the same foodstuffs today and the packaging is drastically different those of us who try to strive for as much authenticity as we can don't deserve to be labelled farb. Indeed, the only canned food I've been able to find with the WWII style "key" opener is Kroger brand Corned Beef. Sadly everything is more based on pull top technology. There are those of us who try to do our best to replicate the WWII K Rations are severely hampered by the availability of such foodstuffs to simulate what we are trying to replicate. Myself, I try to follow that chart which was posted in this thread. I try to make it look as close as possible to the real thing. I stay away from modern packaging and do my best to make the contents look like the real thing according to photos and references. Granted, there are those out there who don't, insisting on pulling out modern foods during events and I will agree that IS farb. I personally do living history displays so that doesn't work for me so I strive to use what I can to get as close as I can. So do a lot of others. It doesn't make us farb in my book. It makes us dedicated.

 

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites
A careful read of my statement will show the use of the word "about" not "exactly the size of".... If you look at the chart showing the different components of the K Rations you will see that cubes were used in the Parachute ration, and switched to the tablets afterwards. Looking at the chart, the tablets actually were approximately the same size as two cubes... maybe just a little larger, and yes, the blocks were introduced in the 1945 time frame so wouldn't be suitable for a mid war impression let's say. Keeping in mind that we don't have the same foodstuffs today and the packaging is drastically different those of us who try to strive for as much authenticity as we can don't deserve to be labelled farb. Indeed, the only canned food I've been able to find with the WWII style "key" opener is Kroger brand Corned Beef. Sadly everything is more based on pull top technology. There are those of us who try to do our best to replicate the WWII K Rations are severely hampered by the availability of such foodstuffs to simulate what we are trying to replicate. Myself, I try to follow that chart which was posted in this thread. I try to make it look as close as possible to the real thing. I stay away from modern packaging and do my best to make the contents look like the real thing according to photos and references. Granted, there are those out there who don't, insisting on pulling out modern foods during events and I will agree that IS farb. I personally do living history displays so that doesn't work for me so I strive to use what I can to get as close as I can. So do a lot of others. It doesn't make us farb in my book. It makes us dedicated.

 

Wayne

 

Hi Wayne,

 

ye said: "The tablets were about the size of two cubes. ", which in my interpretation of our common language equates as two cubes joined together are pretty close to one (Domino*) sugar tablet, at least here in the UK (which I qualified in my statement).. Perhaps it's my Scots language, compared to yer American which leads me to interpret the statement meaning pretty close to, as compared to what they actually are, and that is half the size of two cubes... However, if ye had said "not exactly the same size" I would have understood better what ye where trying to say, which is, and I agree, two cubes are not exactly the same size, in fact not even close to the same size, again, at least UK, or British sugar cubes....

 

"An M65 is about the same design as an M43" is not the same as saying "An M65 is not exactly the same design as an M43".... The first is in the positive and trying to justify, the second is being polite, but still being in the negative, that is, "don't use it"**...

 

 

As much as I admire folk who strive to do their best, as ye say Wayne, it's not possible in some cases, but ye can get close to, and the means are there in some cases, in some they're not, and that goes across the board...

 

In the end it's all down to one's own interpretation and opinion...

 

 

 

 

* In all the Wartime C and K ration examples I have in my possession, the tablets are made by a company called Domino, and they still produce tablets which match Wartime tablets of the same name, and ye can easily get them in the US... I had to send for a box here in the UK... EDIT: the tablets ye can get in France, are indeed "about the same size" as they are only slightly, by mm, larger than the US Domino tablets...

 

** In my opinion ...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Wayne,

 

ye said: "The tablets were about the size of two cubes. ", which in my interpretation of our common language equates as two cubes joined together are pretty close to one (Domino*) sugar tablet, at least here in the UK (which I qualified in my statement).. Perhaps it's my Scots language, compared to yer American which leads me to interpret the statement meaning pretty close to, as compared to what they actually are, and that is half the size of two cubes... However, if ye had said "not exactly the same size" I would have understood better what ye where trying to say, which is, and I agree, two cubes are not exactly the same size, in fact not even close to the same size, again, at least UK, or British sugar cubes....

 

"An M65 is about the same design as an M43" is not the same as saying "An M65 is not exactly the same design as an M43".... The first is in the positive and trying to justify, the second is being polite, but still being in the negative, that is, "don't use it"**...

As much as I admire folk who strive to do their best, as ye say Wayne, it's not possible in some cases, but ye can get close to, and the means are there in some cases, in some they're not, and that goes across the board...

 

In the end it's all down to one's own interpretation and opinion...

* In all the Wartime C and K ration examples I have in my possession, the tablets are made by a company called Domino, and they still produce tablets which match Wartime tablets of the same name, and ye can easily get them in the US... I had to send for a box here in the UK... EDIT: the tablets ye can get in France, are indeed "about the same size" as they are only slightly, by mm, larger than the US Domino tablets...

 

** In my opinion ...

 

What we have here... is a faliure... to communicate... LOL

 

It has been said that Americans and the English are two peoples separated by the same language....

 

I knew that Domino made the tablets then, and I use two Domino cubes wrapped together to simulate the tabs. I didn't know that the tablets were still available... I'll contact the company and see if I can get some. The cubes are all I've been able to get my hands on at the grocery store here. I'm all about getting as accurate as I can and if I can get my hands on proper sized tabs, darn skippy I'll use them.

 

On the plus side, the WW II Charms candies are still available, which is a plus, albeit in modern packaging. I re-wrap them in period wrappings and labels. I got mine from www.candycrate.com

 

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites
What we have here... is a faliure... to communicate... LOL

 

It has been said that Americans and the English are two peoples separated by the same language....

 

Wayne

 

 

Darn tootin there's a communication failure... I'M SCOTTISH, not English mate :thumbdown:

 

And Scotland is not a wee county inside England, we don't have an English queen, an English Prime Minister, aswell as a US ambassador to England, and I can't travel abroad with an English passport.. Their all British/UK, yep, even the "Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland"...

 

Scots are direct and sometimes come across as agressive to our southern poofs (sorry guys, I know I live here), or at least abrasive as we're so direct in our speak....Once folk get to know that, it's usually fine...

 

Personally, I think anyone who tries to get this part of our hobby the best and most "correct" they can, and I've said it before, get's my vote... :thumbsup:

Link to post
Share on other sites
On the plus side, the WW II Charms candies are still available, which is a plus, albeit in modern packaging. I re-wrap them in period wrappings and labels. I got mine from www.candycrate.com

 

Wayne

 

Here's some Charms I have reproduced, one of them is the original:

assortedcharms.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's some Charms I have reproduced, one of them is the original:

assortedcharms.jpg

 

Scottish? Fancy that... I've traced my family name back through 1140 from around Lanarkshire... For years I thought my name was French as my ancestors migrated to the US from French Canada. They didn't give any notice to the fact they migrated from Scotland to Canada prior to that...

 

Nice looking Charms! If I had to pick the original one, I would have to say the second one up from the bottom with the loose flap. I started wrapping mine in tracing paper and then the outer wrapper around the outside of that... it seemed to more closely represent the original's I've seen and its a heck of a lot easier than the brown paper I've seen some repops wrapped with, though I'd do it with the brown paper too. I'd like to find some thin waxed brown kraft paper...

 

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scottish? Fancy that... I've traced my family name back through 1140 from around Lanarkshire... For years I thought my name was French as my ancestors migrated to the US from French Canada. They didn't give any notice to the fact they migrated from Scotland to Canada prior to that...

 

Nice looking Charms! If I had to pick the original one, I would have to say the second one up from the bottom with the loose flap. I started wrapping mine in tracing paper and then the outer wrapper around the outside of that... it seemed to more closely represent the original's I've seen and its a heck of a lot easier than the brown paper I've seen some repops wrapped with, though I'd do it with the brown paper too. I'd like to find some thin waxed brown kraft paper...

 

Wayne

 

Correct, the colour, the extra bit of waxproof paper is a give away... I use greaseproof paper like the original... also, we get similar sweets/candy as Charms here in the UK, and ye get them at the £1 shop, 5 packets for a £1 they where (equates to $2 I think) but it's a right pain wrapping them in the wax paper etc, haven't done any for ages...

 

Lanarkshire?... I once lived in Woolfords, right on top of Lanark moore, dreich almost all year round as I remember it.... I read a good book, "How the Scots Created Canada"... Even in the US, the cattle barons where all Scots, in Scotland pre Union days, the cattle droves went from all over the Highlands to Lanark market, the likes of Rob roy used to way lay some on the way, after which the market shifted to Carlyle (the reason Rob Roy was a supporter of the Union, opened the trade) which fed the troops in the British Army... Aye, we get around...

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the D-bar was a mixture of chocolate, oatmeal and some other things. I know somebody on the ww2 reenactors forum has a recipe to make them. Spam was issued during ww2, but the labels were different and the cans used to open with a key. You can find files to print out your own Spam labels on the ww2 reenactors forum. I think Club crackers are better to use then Ritz since they are similar to the ones that came in K -rations.

 

 

Try these for your crakers (biscuits) http://www.famousfoods.com/hemimilucr12.html

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...

Wow, it's been a long imte since I've been on here, I promised I'd show my attempt at a 5in1 ration, here goes;

5in1-2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.