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Garandomatic

Masters of the Air was so riveting in places that I stayed awake until 2 AM reading... Had to get up to teach 4 hrs later!

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Schofield1943

"In the Garden of Beasts" by Erik Larson.

 

The story of American ambassador William Dodd's time in Berlin in 1933.

 

I thoroughly enjoyed that book - so much so I plan on rereading it.

 

I just finished Larson's most recent book on the sinking of the Lusitania, 'Dead Wake'.

 

Also an excellent read.

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I thoroughly enjoyed that book - so much so I plan on rereading it.

 

I just finished Larson's most recent book on the sinking of the Lusitania, 'Dead Wake'.

 

Also an excellent read.

 

Devil in the White City is also really good. He knows how to tell a story in a way that keeps you turning pages.

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I'm currently reading "Combat and Other Shenanigans: Tales of the Absurd from a Deployment to Iraq," by Piers Platt: https://www.amazon.com/Combat-Other-Shenanigans-Absurd-Deployment/dp/1496128672/ref=la_B00ECFY0BE_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1484244571&sr=1-7

Not a bad book and it pulls no punches as to what a LT's life is like (he reminds of me of myself when I was an LT, I also couldn't easily cope with the insanity of Army life at that level). It's awfully short, though.

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I thoroughly enjoyed that book - so much so I plan on rereading it.

 

I just finished Larson's most recent book on the sinking of the Lusitania, 'Dead Wake'.

 

Also an excellent read.

 

So far I am about 1/3 of the way through the book and it's great. Very interesting to read about how a lot in US government turned a blind eye to militarism and treatment of Jews and other minorities in Germany prior to WWII. They were more concerned with not saying or doing anything that would disrupt the false hope of Germany's WWI payments, which were obviously never going to be paid.

 

I`ve heard of `Dead Wake` and will put it on my list of books to read.

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I picked up a new copy of this book for pennies.I'm a couple years late to the party, but it's refreshing to read a humble war memoir every once in a while.

 

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Just finished, " Kindred Spirits, in the service of Uncle Sam"

 

Story of 4 Nurses who served together from North Africa to 3 years on USHS Charles A. Stafford by Orpha Mae Riggles Blood. Anecdotal stories, very easy read. Not so much a history book as personal adventures of four life-long friends.

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I'm at the end of "American Commander" by Ryan Zinke right now.

 

One word? Meh.

Bounces all over the place, goes comically deep into his family history and he throws a wide range of personal opinions into everything that is politically-oriented. It barely scratches the surface of details about his SEAL experiences, which is why most people would buy the book.

Pretty self-serving and not very well written. I wasn't impressed.

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While it is more of a pictoral-history, I am reading 'JEEP JEEP JEEP No.2' by Yasuo Ohtsuka. It is filled with photos of WWII and some Occupation Era/ Korean War jeeps in US service.

 

RC

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I was assigned to read "All Quiet on the Western Front" for history class. Enjoying it.

 

Jacob

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I've been meaning to read, "We were soldiers once...and young" by Hal Moore for a very long time and am now about 3/4 through it.

Amazing book and it must have taken forever to research and write it.

The only problem is now I realize all the errors the film made, of course. :dry:

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The sequel- We are Soldiers Still is really good as well. Explains how the book was made (especially how hard it was to visit Vietnam and interview former enemies) gives some back story, really cool, and also includes some content about the making of the film.

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  • 2 weeks later...

"No Margin for Error" by: Ehud Yonay

A history of the Israeli Air Force (IAF) from earliest times, through its official founding to the Yom Kippur war... some passages are almost "order of battle" in nature. Very good analysis of the people, aircraft, exploits, logistics, tactics, strategy and allies involved.

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Now I'm working my way through the Bernard Cornwall's Sharpe's Rifles series. It's a story of an English officer serving with the 95th Rifles during the war with Napoleon. I'm trying to read them in chronological order and am currently reading Sharpe's Havoc.

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"Fields of Honor: Pivotal Battles of the Civil War" by Edwin Bearss

 

A well written sequential telling of the most important battles told by the author as if he is giving you a tour of the actual battlefield itself. Great overall info on the strategies and commanders involved in each battle.

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I just finished reading "You'll Be Sor-Ree" by Sid Phillips and now I am reading "Guadalcanal Starvation Island" by Eric Hammel.

 

Mike

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Rereading this book, like for the fourth time, a superb book, anyone ever read it, if not, recommended.

 

SALT, a history of this item from the dawn of time to the present around the world. Like if you didn't know, ancient Roman soldiers were sometimes payed with salt, thus the word salary, a lot of fascinating things.

 

 

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