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Today marks the 62nd anniversary of the start of the Korean War.

I recently re-read "Korea, the Forgotten War" by Clay Blair.

I really enjoyed it. It's easy to read and my interest never flagged.

 

"Blair takes a close and blistering look at high-level defense policy and ground-level leadership of the U.S. Army in Korea from the opening of the war in 1950 through the first yearthe "pendulum period" before the final battle lines were drawnthen summarizes the subsequent "talking war" period, which lasted for two years. That first year, the author amply demonstrates, was a ghastly ordeal for the Army, partly because of President Truman's untimely strip-down of the armed forces, and partly because of incompetent leadership in the field. No historian has been more critical of General Douglas MacArthur's leadership during this period than Blair is in these pages. He also faults corps and division commanders, especially General Edward Almond of X Corps. On the other hand, his admiration is unstinting for General Matthew Ridgway, who took over a demoralized field army and quickly turned it into a fighting force."

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"As long as man exists, there will be war. The only way to avoid trouble is to have the best Army, Navy and Air Force." George S. Patton, Jr.

SAVE THE A-10!

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After returning from "D-Day week" in Normandy I dusted off Mark Bando's "101st Airborne: The Screamin' Eagles at Normandy". Having walked the battlefields helps to bring the text alive.

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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"If Chaos Reigns" by Flint Whitlock, published by Casemate in 2011.

 

Sorry to say, it is NOT very good or recommended. If I had looked at it more closely in the store, I would not have invested in it.

 

While in general, it is "highly average", there are dozens of little inaccuracies,misleading (mislead?) statements and lapses and gaps that it will only serve to irritate a reader already familiar with the subject. No new material and precious little new insight.

 

It does NOT really address the sticking points of The Plan and The Execution that made up "The Near-Disaste rand Ultimate Triumph of the Allied Airborne Forces on D-Day, June 6, 1944", as proclaimed on the dust jacket.

 

A REVISED EDITION could stand better editing, some expansion, new maps and pictures, and consultation with subject matter experts (Sorry, the author doesn't qualify) for revisions..

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I am currently reading The Bridge at Dong Ha by John Miller. In would recommend this book.

 

Thanks Al

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Brave Cannons 92nd Armored Field Artillery Battalion

 

Member Chute and Dagger

 

 

 

Bobby Orr is the Best Player that ever laced up a pair of skates.

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Just finished "Home Before Morning" about a Vietnam nurse. Very interesting.

 

Now starting "American Nightingale - The Story Of Frances Slanger Forgotten Heroine of Normandy" about the first nurse killed in Europe after D-Day. Great so far....

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Began the book "Strike & Hold" by T. Moffatt Burriss, an 82nd AB vet of N. Africa to Berlin. I quickly realized I had previously read the book because I recognized how bad and judgemental the writing style was. Discarded that one for "Call of Duty" by Lynn Compton of "Band of Brothers" fame. Much better told story, 1/3rd through and one that will definitely compliment my Ambrose and Winter's versions.

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Just finished "A Thousand Letters Home." Got a nice personalized copy as my b-day present and loved it. This guy wrote love letters like a mad man :) If anyone is interested in 102d division, he was in it. Their daughter edited the letters/book and my only criticism is that she cites Wikipedia quite a few times. Learned a few cool things--didn't know "burpies" was a 1940's term for example, and the similarities in 1940's soldiers and modern soldiers are astoundingly many. I'll put out a shameless plug for the book and include the website www.athousandlettershome.com

 

Stephanie

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Reading American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea,and Vietnam by Peter S. Kindsvatter. This is a terrific book that pulls together the experiences of individual soldiers during each conflict, drawing on well known(as well as less well known books) to drive home the author's arguments about how infantrymen coped with and carried out their duties. One of the fascinating things about the book is that he pulls together a lot of common psychological threads throughout which really gives you a feel for what these guys went through. Another really neat thing about the book is that the works cited page provides a list of veteran memoirs from each conflict, many of which I look forward to digging into myself.

I research military records including official military personnel files and much more. If you have an individual veteran you need researched please visit my site:

 

WWII Military Service Records WWII Morning Reports  Army O.MP.F. WWII Navy service records WWII U.S.M.C. Service Records 

WWII After Action Reports  Civil War Pensions  XC Files IDPF WWII records  

 

 

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Finished a book about Jean Lafitte this morning and am almost midway through"Lieutenant Calley, His Own Story". I was at Ft. Benning while he was there which was very surreal because there were restrictions on base passes and talking to anyone in civilian clothes {reporters}. I was overseas when he was convicted and the reaction among many included black armbands as a silent protest. Not much new for me except as his version of events.

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Currently reading "War in Korea - the Report of a Woman Combat Correspondent" by Marguerite (Maggie) Higgins

 

I am about 1/2 way thru and that was all in one day. It is a great read.....Kat

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On the advice of a friend, "Horse Soldiers" by Doug Stanton.

 

The STORY carries itself, despite the author.

 

He comes across as a pretty good variant of the usual "journalist", but a "journalist" nevertheless.

 

Definitely NOT savvy on military matters. Apparently no fact-checking or editing by subject matter experts before printing. Some errors are so stupid, makes ya wanna throw the book across the room.

 

My wife, by my sputtering, suggested maybe he is the person in charge of the History channel's shallow, silly program filler groaners. She may be right.

 

I give the book a B, the author a C-.

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Now it's "RAKKASAN!" by Gen. Flanagan,

 

Overall it gets an A-, losing points for his personal opinion input(s) and cheerleading. Very taken with West Pointers -- just gotta point out every Pointer, their Class, what sport they played. IIRC no non-USMA were so extolled. He also imparts a high opinion of himself, many times -- self-effacing NOT.

 

As far as research, he would have been totally lost if he could not have plagiarized wholesale from earlier-published sources, such as the 11th Abn Div history, The Angels, the Army Green Books, etc. And been able to quote at length from chats with his pals (i.e., Pointers and generals).

 

There are also a lot of pesky errors, especially re VN ops and ODS. (After his day in the sun, so they got a fast shuffle.)

 

HOWEVER, I found the Korean War era coverage GOOD and useful.

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Currently reading "Some Survived An Eyewitness Account of the Bataan Death March and the Men Who Lived Through It" by Manny Lawton. The book is great so far. Until I started reading the book, I did not realize he was a Clemson grad!

 

:thumbsup:

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Eat & Run by Scott Jurak (distance ultra running & nutrition)

Not My Son by Rodney Peete (about raising an autistic child)

Undaunted Courage by Stephan Ambrose (The Lewis & Clark Expedition)

 

... I can never have just one book on the nightstand... and usually a book on tape in the car!

Wartime Collectables Military Antiques
Andrew H. Lipps
email wartime@wartimecollectables.com
On the web at http://www.wartimecollectables.com

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Sgt. of the guard at Nuremberg - Jim Sharp

Written by my friend Jim Sharp who was with the 1st Infantry during WW2 and was assigned to the guard at Nuremberg

Never Tell an Infantryman to have a nice day - Bob Reid

The wartime story of my friend Bob Reid who was with the 84th Infantry

"In almost all wars, the sight of foreign troops brought fear and terror to the local people, destruction and often senseless killing of local citizens. However, the sight of the American GI always brought smiles and joy to the local French people. They knew we were there to liberate, not to conquer; to help, not to terrorize."

Captain Leo T. Hury, M-Company, 330th Infantry Regiment, 83rd Infantry Division.

In honor of Captain Leo, March 19, 1920 - June 10, 2012

 

Profile picture: Pfc. John T. DiMauro, E Company, 331st Infantry Regiment

January 23, 1926 - KIA January 13, 1945 near Langlire, Belgium after 11 days on the frontline

 

Looking for anything related to the 83rd Infantry Division (1917-today)

Visit my personal website: www.normandytothebulge.be

Learn more about the 83rd Infantry Divison assocation at: www.83rdassociation.com

 

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Just finished Secrets of Inchon by Commander Eugene Clark. It is a first-person account of the amazing operation to recon and take the islands along the channel leading to Inchon prior to the invasion. I first heard of this book in the notes of W.E.B. Griffin's final book of The Corps series, and just happened to stumble across it in a used bookstore.

I cannot recommend this book highly enough. It is a good read and just plain amazing story. Commander Clark wrote the manuscript for his family and never attempted to publish it in his lifetime, but thankfully it finally came into print. I think the most remarkable thing about the story is how this is a quintessential example of the special forces concept and use of indigenous personnel to create a fighting force. The fact that this was all accomplished by a lone U.S. Navy officer and a couple ROK guys is truly breathtaking.

Just take a look at Clark's bio and you'll get some idea of this man's record, Eugene Clark.

The book first came out about 10+ years ago so you might find it in used shops, if you do pick it up.

Secrets of Inchon

Always looking for medic helmets, 30th Infantry Division/Brigade items, and TOW missile items.

 

 

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Rush's Lancers by Eric Wittenberg. It is about the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment | 7th Pennsylvania Volunteers. As this is the unit my GGG grandfather served with and was discharged (with a permanent disability) from in early '63. The unit carried the lance rather than a carbine up until May of 1863.

I do not profess to be a militaria expert, but I conduct as much research as I am capable of and then write about my findings.
Check out my blogs, The Veteran's Collection (general militaria) and Chevrons and Diamonds (military baseball)

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Just finished Secrets of Inchon by Commander Eugene Clark. It is a first-person account of the amazing operation to recon and take the islands along the channel leading to Inchon prior to the invasion. I first heard of this book in the notes of W.E.B. Griffin's final book of The Corps series, and just happened to stumble across it in a used bookstore.

I cannot recommend this book highly enough. It is a good read and just plain amazing story. Commander Clark wrote the manuscript for his family and never attempted to publish it in his lifetime, but thankfully it finally came into print. I think the most remarkable thing about the story is how this is a quintessential example of the special forces concept and use of indigenous personnel to create a fighting force. The fact that this was all accomplished by a lone U.S. Navy officer and a couple ROK guys is truly breathtaking.

Just take a look at Clark's bio and you'll get some idea of this man's record, Eugene Clark.

The book first came out about 10+ years ago so you might find it in used shops, if you do pick it up.

Secrets of Inchon

 

I read this book a few years ago and I second your recommendation.

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● D-Day Minus 17 September 1944. Pictorial History of the 101st Airborne Division Prior To the Invasion of Holland (ISBN 978-2-9540297-0-2)

 

● Orange Is The Color of The Day. Pictorial History of the 101st Airborne Division in the Liberation of Holland (ISBN 978-2-9540297-1-9)

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