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What are you currently reading?


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Just picked up a 1st addition copy of Omaha Beachhead printed in 1945. Gonna start reading it tonight!! :thumbsup:

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ALWAYS LOOKING FOR WWII 8TH & 9TH AAF UNIFORMS/NAMED MEDALS/SCRAPBOOKS/ANY TYPE OF GROUPING!

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Guadalcanal Diary Tregaskis (Again)

Victory at Guadalcanal Lee

Guadalcanal Frank

 

Barren Beaches of Hell

Coral Comes High Hunt

 

Queen of the Flat tops Johnston (Interesting to see USN pilots I.D. some Japanese planes as Messerschmitts... I am guessing they saw Tonys)

 

Invasion Carell

Stalingrad Shroter

 

I read mostly Old books.

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  • 1 month later...

Just started listening to Fearless: The Undaunted Courage and Ultimate Sacrifice of Navy SEAL Team SIX Operator Adam Brown

Thanks
Don

....The Right of the People to Keep and Bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

 

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At the recommendation of a member, I am reading Paris 1919. I am lured by the events and politics that led to the birth of the Nazis and the rebirth of a militant Germany. This book, though daunting, is extremely thorough and detailed. It also makes plain the Hitler thrived and ascended to power for more reasons than the Versailles Treaty. And we all know what happened because of the diplomacy, incompetence and blunders of the powers who met in Paris 1919.

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"Carlson's Raiders".

Interesting story of the 2nd Raider Battalion (West Coast).

(Edson started the 1st Raider Battalion on the East Coast).

Carlson was an unusual Marine. He had some great ideas but also some nutty ones.

Book covers the Makin Raid, the Long Patrol on Guadalcanal, the enmity from Edson and others, interesting book.

Jon.

"As long as man exists, there will be war. The only way to avoid trouble is to have the best Army, Navy and Air Force." George S. Patton, Jr.

SAVE THE A-10!

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Just moments ago finished "Invasion 1944", a 1950 translation of former general Hans Speidel's German version of facing the invading Allies. An interesting point was made that the German veterans of many years were facing young men fresh off the farms and with no more experience than running bayonets through straw targets. Oversimplified but great testament.

Now beginning "Wings" by John Monk Saunders, the 1927 book adaptation of the movie. My interest is to see how closely this novel parallels actual events. It is also a bit of diversion away from the historical works that crowd my bookshelves.

Like many others here I prefer the first editions, the older the better. It was a thrill to read the original 1925 version of "Winged Defense" by William Mitchell and to get more details on the bombing trials of the Ostfrieland and the rest of the ships assembled for the demonstration.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am reading Halsey's Typhoon by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin. I had a 2nd cousin FC/2c RH Hicks who was lost when the ship he served on USS Hull DD350 was lost in this typhoon 18 Dec 1944.

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"Carlson's Raiders".

Interesting story of the 2nd Raider Battalion (West Coast).

(Edson started the 1st Raider Battalion on the East Coast).

Carlson was an unusual Marine. He had some great ideas but also some nutty ones.

Book covers the Makin Raid, the Long Patrol on Guadalcanal, the enmity from Edson and others, interesting book.

Jon.

 

I thought that was a great book, Jon. As you say, Carlson was a very interesting Marine in a number of ways. The account of the Makin raid is excellent, though it's a wonder they ever made it off that island alive!

 

I've just started Helmet for My Pillow, need I say more?

 

Will

WWII USMC & USN - CAMOUFLAGE / CORPSMAN / PARAMARINE / MARINE RAIDER / DENIM / DECK JACKETS.

 

VIETNAM - CAMOUFLAGE / SF / 'IN-COUNTRY' ITEMS.

 

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I am reading "Trench Knives and Mustard Gas"; which is a memoir of an officer in the 168th Infantry, Rainbow Division in WW1.

 

Good read!

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Always interested in the 166th Infantry, 42nd Division, A.E.F.

Quality WW1 studio portraits and real photo postcards of Distinguished Service Cross recipients; showing steel helmets; or other interesting content.

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"Carlson's Raiders".

Interesting story of the 2nd Raider Battalion (West Coast).

(Edson started the 1st Raider Battalion on the East Coast).

Carlson was an unusual Marine. He had some great ideas but also some nutty ones.

Book covers the Makin Raid, the Long Patrol on Guadalcanal, the enmity from Edson and others, interesting book.

Jon.

 

Just finished it last week. Good book.

 

Bill

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I am still reading the tome, Paris 1919 but I had to put it down to watch a perfect game thrown by Giant's pitcher Matt Cain. The first one in Giant's 128 year history and the 22nd ever in Major League Baseball.

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I am not currently reading this book, but I do recommend it: Fighting the Bolsheviks: The Russian War Memoir of Private First Class Donald E. Carey, U.S. Army, 1918-1919. It is fascinating to read the first-person account of the US mission to assist the White Russians during the civil war. I learned a great deal from this book which I have not been able to find elsewhere. Without a doubt, the perspective of a ground-pounder always makes for an interesting story.

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"A good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week." - Gen. George S. Patton

"The fact that battle is a horrifying spectacle must make us take war more seriously, but not provide an excuse for gradually blunting our swords in the name of humanity. Sooner or later someone will come along with a sharp sword and hack off our arms." - Carl von Clausewitz

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Just started listening to Fearless: The Undaunted Courage and Ultimate Sacrifice of Navy SEAL Team SIX Operator Adam Brown

 

 

I have finished listening to this book and enjoyed it very much, gives a great overview of the entire life of Adam Brown and the demons he overcame.

 

Now I am listening to The Great Courses "The Iliad and The Odyssey of Homer" courses by Professor Elizabeth Vandiver

Thanks
Don

....The Right of the People to Keep and Bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

 

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Started Stephen Ambrose's Citizen Soldiers a few days ago. I read it's counterpart, D-Day two years ago and loved it. Finally getting around to reading this one, and it's fantastic. Ambrose's attention to detail is fantastic, and he somehow manages to maintain interest throughout hundreds of pages of straight-up fact. That takes talent. This stuff can get dry easily yet he keeps it interesting. Both are highly recommended if you're looking for a rundown of the US Army in the ETO during WWII.

Looking for items named to PFC John Surin (WWII-Army) or Anton Freitag (WWII-Navy).


Focus: WWII Helmets and Army Infantry Field Gear



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Just started Black April: The Fall of South Vietnam, 1973-75 by George Veith. It's a pretty good look at the end of the war and all the factors on both sides that led to the collapse of South Vietnam. Gives quite a bit of insight into ARVN forces fighting in 1975 and does them more justice than the TV documentaries about the period have. Anyway, so far it's been a pretty good book about a period of history no one likes to talk about.

Always interested in buying Vietnam-era Air Force, Army helicopter units, and Illinois veteran items.

Looking for items identified to Captain Charles M. Porter, Company C, 131st Infantry, 33rd Division AEF.

 

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The First Air Race by Owen S. Lieberg is a 1974 reprint of the 1909 book about the first international race Reims, France. Many of the future greats of aviation participated but what is interesting is how the crews broke new technical ground each time they flew {or almost flew}. This later edition updates the later accomplishments of men like Glenn Curtiss as well as the relationship between the Wright brothers and the French govt. Nicely written at about page 60 of 210.

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I am not currently reading this book, but I do recommend it: Fighting the Bolsheviks: The Russian War Memoir of Private First Class Donald E. Carey, U.S. Army, 1918-1919. It is fascinating to read the first-person account of the US mission to assist the White Russians during the civil war. I learned a great deal from this book which I have not been able to find elsewhere. Without a doubt, the perspective of a ground-pounder always makes for an interesting story.

 

 

I agree. I read it many years ago,great 1st person account of little taught history.

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The Great War in Africa a 1986 book by Byron Farwell, I first read it back in 2002 when I took it out of the library in when I was living in Los Angeles, I just reordered it from amazon, it very very good. This Byron Farwell, he has written quite a few books on the Victorian era British Army, to include a history of the Ghurkas, I intend to get a few of these titles.

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I've been a little deeper than I want to be into my Haynes truck manual lately but I'm also enjoying "Sky Pioneering" by Ruth Reinhold. Ruth was a life long Az aviatrix and her book is about the earliest days of aviation in Az. Of interest is how the military influenced many of the early airports. Very good, in depth history.

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