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Warning on WWII Ammo 30-06!


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I have a bunch of CMP LC 69 M2 30-06. It's delinked, so does that mean it's not a good idea to fire it in my MI? I am working on my second can of it, and wonder now if it's bad news since it was for MG.

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Again M2 ball spec is M2 ball spec as far as pressure is concerned. There is no M2 "Machine Gun Only" versions! Lake city is fine, so don't worry about your 69 dated stuff. As I have already mentioned some foriegn made M2 ball is corrosive as is early (about 1955 and older) US made M2 ball, and some is just spooky dangerous - i.e. the french made M2 ball has weak or poorly drawn brass casings. There is also a few lots of Korean PS M2 ball from 1974 that has shown problems with split necks. The guy who says here are some free handloads they work great! :blink: Stay away from that! I highly suggest that some of you gentleman do a little more info searching and a little less internet rumour spreading. As for the Remington M2 that started the thread, it is very possible some of it has "gone bad" if not stored properly over the years (and really who can tell somtimes), so Costa is fine for suggesting caution in its use. Truthfully WWII and Korean era M2 ball is worth more as a collectable than for shooting purposes. If you are just absolutly freaked about which ammo to shoot in your M1 then by all means, buy a Schuster or McCann adjustable gas plug, read the directions on its use, and set it up to shoot whichever favorite hunting ammo you like. If you can not, or will not do that, then you best start doing your homework in reguards to learning which M2 ball surplus or commercial ammo is safe to shoot in your personal M1 Rifle.

 

No need to get all freaked out over this. Buy some books, do some reading.

 

Semper Fi, Rob

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The Marine is right.

Despite the odd markings on the can it is safe ammo. the later stuff is especially good due to it being of newer manufacture. I had the opportunity to ask the good people at the cmp north store about this ammo. It is really nice being within driving distance from camp perry.But they said it was intended to go to the foreign assistance program but was kept stateside to fire over the heads of basic trainees during low crawl training. Hence the "overhead fire" markings on the can and the delinking marks. The 1919's in 30.06 were retired shortly thereafter this stuff was manufactured so it stayed in storage.

Unlike 8mm mauser and 303 there is no "for MG only" round for 30.06 in the us army ordinance handbook. Dose list that ww1 vintage ammo with the nickeled bullet, has a tenancy with the slightest corrosion to have the bullet bond to the flimsy casing. Generating excessive breach pressure. Humm, I wonder if this has anything to do with the "low #" 1903's getting a bad rap? Not that anyone would shoot an m1 ball round anyways. What are they up to by now? $5 a round?

 

More rambelings......

 

I need to get back to the shop......

Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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Maybe its just me, but the suspect ammo in the pictures is not .30-06 M2. The primer and case base dimension are out of proportion. The case head is too big or the primer is too small by my I one o' two.

 

It looks like .303

 

That being said, I have fired thousands of rounds through my 03a3 and Garand over the years. Nasty corrosive stuff. Ball, AP, even gasp...API silver tips.

 

Old ammo with corrosive primers are not inherently evil. Only the act of NOT cleaning the weapon properly is the problem. Neutralize the corrosive primer salts thoroughly and follow up for two or three days after. No problem. No harm, no foul. No evil.

 

Dont forget thaty pesky gas cylinder too.

 

Those pictures do not depict .30-06 ammuntion. Sorry, close but no cigar.

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Maybe its just me, but the suspect ammo in the pictures is not .30-06 M2. The primer and case base dimension are out of proportion. The case head is too big or the primer is too small by my I one o' two.

 

It looks like .303

 

That being said, I have fired thousands of rounds through my 03a3 and Garand over the years. Nasty corrosive stuff. Ball, AP, even gasp...API silver tips.

 

Old ammo with corrosive primers are not inherently evil. Only the act of NOT cleaning the weapon properly is the problem. Neutralize the corrosive primer salts thoroughly and follow up for two or three days after. No problem. No harm, no foul. No evil.

 

Dont forget thaty pesky gas cylinder too.

 

Those pictures do not depict .30-06 ammuntion. Sorry, close but no cigar.

He said it was British A.P... Just RA made ;) .

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Fellas, New member here first post...

 

Just thought it might be worth while to say that before you throw out or trash that suspect ammo, you might sell it to me! Depending on caliber (I'm not picky), I'll shoot it in a Machine Gun and I'm not worried about it hurting it, you can't hurt a Browning!

So if you're interested in disposing of it drop me a line 10 rnds or 1000 I'm game! :thumbsup:

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Hi Fellas, New member here first post...

 

Just thought it might be worth while to say that before you throw out or trash that suspect ammo, you might sell it to me! Depending on caliber (I'm not picky), I'll shoot it in a Machine Gun and I'm not worried about it hurting it, you can't hurt a Browning!

So if you're interested in disposing of it drop me a line 10 rnds or 1000 I'm game! :thumbsup:

 

 

OK on a simplistic point.... I didn't find where anyone mentioned the degredation of the powder.... I have owned 8MM stuff from WW2 Germany that shot clean and fine. I have also had 1950's made FN ammo (quality maker) that was stored in South America, improperly .... that would almost lock back a bolt gun. Know the history of the ammo, nice clean box, but some dope storing it in an outdoor shed for 5 years could be selling you a supprise!

 

Now my question is, any problems reported with specific lots of Korean (AIM sold stuff) or any problems with Greek (CMP stuff)..... only interested in clip loaded ball ammo, no boxed stuff.

 

thanks in advance for any input.

 

151mg :rolleyes:

WW1 42nd Rainbow Division collector

Reenactor and living historian WW1

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funny you should mention this. Just picked up another crate of the good greek stuff from camp perry. The greek ammo, wether it be in boxes or clips will give you no problems. Works in 1903's (yes even low #'s), ultra tight headspaced 1917. A royal typewriter BAR. and a semi auto 1919. Burned up hundreds on hundreds of rounds of the greek ammo with no problems.

The korean stuff however.......

I do not believe that this stuff was stored well. there are some minor inconstancy in power. Fortunately it goes to the lower end with not enough power to open an m-1 action fully. There is only a mmmmm.... 8% chance of that. The biggest problem I had with that korean stuff (other than the retched smell when fired(yak urine?)) was that the cases were a lot softer than than the u.s. counterpart. A slight missfeed and the projectile will be bent almost out of the caseing. Had a few jams where the bullet was pushed almost all the way into the caseing. Plinking =fine. Combat ammo= hell no....

 

Oh beg to differ on the "you can not hurt a browning". Had a few in the shop. They do get maintenance heavy in their old age... Ours is rather picky on what ammo you feed it.

Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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:think: i went thru my somewhat small collection of military ammo and found a round just like the one pictured in the first post,and it is not a 30/06,its an 8mm,i asked a buddy if he had any info on it and he said rem had a foreign contract,so maybe thats what that is

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as i said guys--- dangerous! the powder in the ones i removed was still good. even if you dont tap or kill the primers the round is dead- useless. i have boxes of it that i have to deal with. i am no concerned about deforming the casing or slight grooves in the slug using plyers. i wouldnt even reprimer or load these. its not worth it.

If you dont put oil on the primer or put in the rifle and shoot it (just the primered case) to deactivate it, it is still a live primer if a bullet gets put back in the case and it gets mixed in with good rounds the primer alone is enough to push the bullet into the barrel and get stuck, firing a good round after that could be catastrophic

RIP Sgt Adam J. Ray 4th Bn, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division Feb 9, 2010 Southern Afghanistan

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