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Unknown brown leather boots


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I have a pair of brown leather combat boots.

 

Inside is a black stamp, some part is readable:

INTERNATIONAL SHOE CO.

9 1/2 41..52A

 

Outside is stamped in the leather:

9 1/2 W FK

and in a circle:

NON REPAIRABLE

QM SHOE REP SHOP

CLASS II-IV

 

Can someone ID this combat boots?

post-5276-1238953645.jpg

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I agree with Johan.

 

Appear to be the M45 combat boot with the typical 11 eyelets.

 

RD

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





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These look like standard issue russet (aka: brown) Army boots, subsequently "turned black" when the Army transitioned from the OD to Green uniform during the late 1950s and very early 1960s. This transition period officially began on September 1, 1956, with both OD-33 and AG-44 service uniforms authorized for wear until October 1960, after which ODs were out for active component wear. However, black shoes and boots were mandatory for wear with ODs as well as with Greens from September 1, 1956 (ref. DA Circular 670-5, July 1956). And what did the Army do with its huge stock of russet boots and shoes on hand? It dyed them black and continued to issue them until stocks were depleted (ref. DA Circular 670-22, January 1958, etc.) This program was generally regarded as more Army Chickensh*t among victims of this false economy who had to keep these zombies shined. I know from personal observation that dyed russet combat boots were still being issued as late as the winter of 1961, more than a year after OD-33 uniforms were extinct.

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Then out spake brave Horatius, the Captain of the Gate:


"To every man upon this earth death cometh soon or late.
And how can man die better than facing fearful odds,


For the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his gods."

 

 

 

 

 

 


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I agree with Johan.

 

Appear to be the M45 combat boot with the typical 11 eyelets.

 

RD

You must mean the 1948-pattern, fully-laced, russet brown combat boot? The only fully laced Army combat boot I can think of in use in 1945 was the "jump" boot.

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The M45 boots (I've heard them refered to as M45s, M48s and M50s, but they were initially designed in 1945) were used alongside the M43 buckle boot and M41 jump boot in Korea, but I'm not sure exactly how widespread they were. They're out there. Friend of mine had an entire bin of unissued ones for a while. I had a pair that I wore on a daily basis back in the mid-90s, unfortunately after a year of daily use, the seams all blew out and the sole was ground down to nothing. Oh well...

 

Jon

In memory of 1LT Julius C. Goldman, XO of F/330th, 83rd Infantry Division 1944-45.

 

Looking for P-47 and Tactical Reconnaissance Unit photographs and any items associated with WWII Jewish fighter pilots.

 

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In 1963 in Chicago, for college ROTC, I was issued -- on hand-receipt -- a pair of 1953-dated brown boots that had been spray-dyed black. You could see where the edge of the spray paths were and they had been sprayed with the laces in, so under the laces was brown, and the edges of the welt above the sole did not take the dye well. It was our problem to "work out" the rough spots, blotches, streaks. AND the toes proved basically incapable of taking a high shine.

 

The boots (and fatigues -- HBTs in some cases -- and field jackets -- M43s in most cases) were only given to those cadets in ROTC extracurriculars; I was on the rifle team. The drill team quickly found out about the shineless-ness and raised a hue and cry. Result: The cadre took them to the PX for Corcorans, cost covered out petty cash or whatever supported the extracurriculars.

 

It developed that there was a "mountain" of such boots available at the Pershing Road "quartermaster depot" (this had been the national HQ of QM Commissary svc duruing WWII). As they were free-issue for "reserves" we told our friends in high school, junior ROTC about the opportunity and the mountain soon became a mere hill. They wore them bloused with OD Ike jackets and OG headgear...resembling a foreign contingent.

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...But what about this picture?

I'll revise and extend my earlier comment: Russet boots in very large sizes (14+?) were being issued to active Army soldiers undergoing basic training at Ft. Dix, N.J., in the winter of 1961. No options given: If they fit, the recruit took the russets and he wore them unless or until he otherwise acquired the by-then regulation black combat boots. I have no reason to believe this was not the practice Army-wide in the early 1960s.

 

J_Andrews clearly states the problem for the unfortunate few active Army big-feet who drew russet boots: "...It was our problem to "work out" the rough spots, blotches, streaks. AND the toes proved basically incapable of taking a high shine..." Nevertheless, russet boots were just as serviceable as the black boot and at least nominally acceptable for wear with any Army uniform where combat boots were prescribed. Getting away with wearing them was another issue, although I do recall seeing them on-the-hoof (so to speak) well into the 1960s.

 

Were black dyed russets were ever officially condemned by Army directive? I do not know but it does not surprise me to see that 1st Cav. staff sergeant wearing them, evidently ca. late 1960s (looks like he was wearing a pretty large size, too.) Properly cared for, those 1950s/1960s era combat boots, russet or black, would last for many, many years.

donation2017.gif

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

post-24355-0-52548100-1420800713.png

 

 

Then out spake brave Horatius, the Captain of the Gate:


"To every man upon this earth death cometh soon or late.
And how can man die better than facing fearful odds,


For the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his gods."

 

 

 

 

 

 


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A Korean War vet told me they were issued both types (lace-up and buckle tops). They lace-ups were saved for dress or parade use and the buckle tops were used in the field. How wide spread the practice was I don't know.

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A relative of mine was in a signal unit at Bad Tolz, Germany, in 1954-1956. They had an endless supply of buckle boots and, as said, wore them in the field, reserving M1948s for better wear. There were also "free-issue" re-worked buckle boots that had been coated with a very red shade of russet "paint", as a make-work project for labor service workers.

 

These were avoided like the plague, as they may as well have been dyed day-glo orange. Thus, to use them up, it was decreed that THE boots for Unit Police (gate guard) and Courtesy Patrol (drunk squad) would be the red ones. Then they got a West Pointer as garrsion cdr who decreed that fatigues, field jackets and pile caps were not good enough for such jobs -- only Class A's, with white pistols belts and branch-color neckerchiefs (Signal and Ordnance predominated). Well there was a problem. OD's were just going out and OG 44's coming in. Some men had full sets of ODs (the "old soldiers" who were nearing the end of their draft obligation) and the new arrivals generally had full sets of greens. An unintended result was that some gateguards -- especially big guys or small guys who could not get proper sizes of the new stuff -- wore Ike jackets with green trousers and a service cap of OD or OG , mix and match. This drove the garrison cdr nuts, so he issued out white helmet liners and white gloves and white pistol lanyards (MP gear) to look "even better". But the gasthaus keepers in town HATED it when drunken customers would see white helmets out in the darkened streets, assume the MPs were onto them and bolt out the back door, so the white stuff was reserved for UP duty only (in camp).

 

Finally, in honor of a big parade day (V-E or Memorial Day 1956) with VIPs from Seventh Army HQ, the GIs took revenge on the garrison cdr. They purposely mixed OD and OG and put on every "special dress distinction" at hand. (My relative, as sgt of the gd, wore a chrome color guard helemt with white plastic chin cup, a camo neckerchief and two French forrageres, orange scarf, green blouse, OD trous and red boots with white laces) It worked: a BG got out of his sedan at the gate wanting to know if they were Americans, then WHO had put them into such ridiculous ensembles.... Sooo long, Mr. West Point!

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  • 3 years later...

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