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Rough outs verses Type II Service Shoes


capa
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Need some advice please. I am set to order boots and wanted to know your thoughts on rough out verses the type II service shoes. I am building the gear for a D-Day and onward infantry impression, but have not joined a unit yet. In my research I have seen some reenacting units' equipment pages that are adament about having the rough outs, but when you look at period photos, you see many troops wearing the Type II shoes.

I prefer the look of the Type IIs, but want to be accurate so please advise.

Cheers,

Capa

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Go by period photos of the specific unit you want to recreate, taken in the timefram you want to recreate as well. Most Infantry units got resupplied at some point post-June 1944, so you have to research what new/different/replacement uniform items crop up in the photos from July/August/September/etc to get the "look" correct.

 

And don't go by the (sometimes wayward) statements of re-enactment groups unless they can back up what they're saying by period photos.....

 

And that's from a uniform advisor and C/O of a re-enactment group... :)

 

Cheers,

Glen.

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Johan Willaert

Plus, it's very hard to see on original pictures if the boots worn are in fact Type II or toe-capped reverse uppers, especially if they have been dubbed or polished...

 

If you're only buying one pair, I would go with the type II as you can wear them both in the field and on your Service uniform. Your second pair could be flesh outs...

 

Johan (ex-re-enactor ;) )

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Great advice Glen and Johan--thank you both very much. It's very cool when experienced guys like yourselves share with us newbies.

Cheers,

Capa (a.k.a Fielding)

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Just my two cents... The Roughouts were pretty much limited as a field boot, while the type II (Cap Toe) Service shoes saw both field and Garrison use. As stated above, it would have to be a really clear picture to tell the difference in a field picture, the only visual difference being the cap toe at that point after the roughouts had been dubbed. Also, if you do go for a pair of roughouts later on, dont be alarmed that they dont have a stiffener in the toe area... I'm told the real ones didnt either.

 

Wayne

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Just my two cents... The Roughouts were pretty much limited as a field boot, while the type II (Cap Toe) Service shoes saw both field and Garrison use. As stated above, it would have to be a really clear picture to tell the difference in a field picture, the only visual difference being the cap toe at that point after the roughouts had been dubbed. Also, if you do go for a pair of roughouts later on, dont be alarmed that they dont have a stiffener in the toe area... I'm told the real ones didnt either.

 

Wayne

 

Wayne,

Thanks for taking the time to reply, I appreciate the info.

Cheers,

Capa--

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You are very welcome Capa... just an interesting note... My father was Navy during WWII and Korea... He was in Landing craft, and Landing Craft Support, so he saw his share of marines. He'd had two strokes, and wasnt able to speak well, but when I wore my roughouts to his house the first time, he looked at me and said, "Hey... Boondockers!" Seems the Marines wore the same boot, and called them boondockers, or the two boots were very similar. Still, it is one of the fond memories I carry of my father's valiant last days before Cancer took him from us in January.

 

I dont know about how you intend to dub your new boots, but I'm using brown Kiwi polish on my Jump boots, which in essence are similar to the Type II Cap toe boots, only with a taller ankle. A well polished pair of boots will definitely be water resistant, as proven by my 28 years in the Army polishing boots. For a pair of roughouts, or double buckles, I would begin with several coats of Kiwi Wet Proof, and if the leather didnt darken enough, then maybe a few coats of brown Kiwi polish. Good luck with your new boots!

 

Wayne

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You are very welcome Capa... just an interesting note... My father was Navy during WWII and Korea... He was in Landing craft, and Landing Craft Support, so he saw his share of marines. He'd had two strokes, and wasnt able to speak well, but when I wore my roughouts to his house the first time, he looked at me and said, "Hey... Boondockers!" Seems the Marines wore the same boot, and called them boondockers, or the two boots were very similar. Still, it is one of the fond memories I carry of my father's valiant last days before Cancer took him from us in January.

 

I dont know about how you intend to dub your new boots, but I'm using brown Kiwi polish on my Jump boots, which in essence are similar to the Type II Cap toe boots, only with a taller ankle. A well polished pair of boots will definitely be water resistant, as proven by my 28 years in the Army polishing boots. For a pair of roughouts, or double buckles, I would begin with several coats of Kiwi Wet Proof, and if the leather didnt darken enough, then maybe a few coats of brown Kiwi polish. Good luck with your new boots!

 

Wayne

 

 

Wayne,

Wow, that is a really poignant memory to have of your Dad. It's amazing what will trigger our memories--for my short time in the Marine Corps, it's the smell of diesel exhaust and Kiwi polish.

many thanks again,

Capa

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