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2.95" Vickers Mountain Gun Round 1914


opus5150

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opus5150

Thought I would post up a neat find.  Used to be a lamp at one time which was heavily soldered to a brass base.  Was able to disassemble and clean up a bit after a long soak in EvapORust, enough to read the head stamp.  From what I've found on the web, these guns started out in 1914, and continued to be fielded by various units until WW2. Thanks!

 

1.jpg.97ba5e3b75e767e5cd6d827f8547832c.jpg2.jpg.9c69415b387ba025cd9fa5ee5ae42bee.jpg

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opus5150

Thank you for the ordnance drawings! I hoped the shell had potential when I saw it, but had no idea of the type until it was apart. 

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I don’t think the projectile is correct for the casing. Your projectile looks to be a common US 75mm shrapnel kind, the US 75mm shrapnel projectile does not have a crimping groove. The drawings I posted of the 2.75 projectile has two crimping grooves. In other words, if your projectile does not have two grooves below the driving band, it is not correct for tge shell casing.

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More: the 2.95 shrapnel round is 9.69” long, the US 75mm shrapnel shell is 11 1/4” overall length ( one from my collection). I suspect it is a put together, in other words, a common U.S. 75 mm Shrapnel projectile stuck in a 2.95 case.

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I had just took a pic of my common US 75mm Shrapnel round, I will post it anyway with measurements for any future references. I buy them if they are unfired examples, ie, clean unmarked driving bands.

IMG_6500.jpeg

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One last word, as your 2.95 is a rarer find, may I suggest you put a coating of Renaissance Wax on it. Museums use this wax, you will notice my pictured 75 has a slight “ sheen” to it as it is waxed. The good thing about Renaissance wax is it will adhere to even slight surface rust, and seals it from further oxidation, fingerprints, etc. It is commonly applied to artifacts that are to deteriorated or to delicate to clean and preserves the “ as found” condition.

IMG_6501.jpeg

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opus5150

Will pick up some wax, thanks for the suggestion. Thought I’d post a couple more shells for reference, it seems I have another projectile with two grooves, but came with a common shell. 
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I am not certain, from recall. Firstly, The US 3” Shrapnel projectiles had crimping grooves, the 75mm did not. Secondly there are websites that have examples with pictures, no time to find them. From your pictures, positive ID can also be made by counting the rifling grooves impressed on the driving band. 27 rings a bell for a French shrapnel round…sorry no time to dig further.

 

Off  the bat, I suspect the pictured ones with two crimping grooves are 3”, one US, one French. I will search as time permits. 

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Is the one on the right your 2.95”? If so , I will bet the center is a U.S. 3” shrapnel. Sorry for the dis jointed replies, not much time.

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Just saw this:

 

https://oldguns.net/pix/897.jpg

 

NEW ADDITION** 897 SCARCE VICKERS 2.95 INCH MOUNTAIN GUN BRASS SHELL CASE (75 x 168mmR) - The 2.95 inch (75mm) Mountain guns were originally made for an Egyptian order. While not adopted by the British Army (which was happy with their 10 pounder or 2.75 inch mountain guns), they were used by most of the British colonies in Africa, and the U.S. Army purchased 12 in 1899 for use in the Philippines, and eventually ended up with 30 guns from Vickers and 100 made at Watervliet Arsenal. Vickers Sons & Maxim provided ammunition for most of the users, but by 1914 the U.S. was making some ammo at Frankford Arsenal for these. There is a nice Wiki write up on these at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QF_2.95-inch_mountain_gun Brass case not marked except for the VS&M logo of the Vickers Sons & Maxim company used when operating under that name circa 1897-1911, although the VS&M marks may have been used into WW1. Vickers made their first artillery piece in 1890, and added Nordenfelt and Maxim to the company in 1897. Nice shape with mellow chocolate patina. Possibly U.S. Army used, or possibly in Colonial Africa campaigns. Only second one of these we have ever seen. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $175.00 (View Picture)

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illinigander

Since the Frankford Arsenal case is marked Subcal Gun I assume it was used with a tube mounted in a larger cannon as a less expensive aiming round.  That is probably a rare case.

illinigander

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