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Clarification on the Robbins Flying R Hallmark


WarRelics

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From looking at a reference book and posts from the forum I have read that the Flying R hallmark in a rectangle is post war. I have also read that the Flying R has been found in WWII veterans groupings. My question is this, which hallmark was found, the raised Flying R inside a rectangle with raised sterling or was it the incised one with a raised sterling that is recognized as a wartime hallmark. I have attached a photo of the raised Flying R inside a rectangle for reference. The post I saw wasn’t specific about which Flying R hallmark was found, only that it had been found in WWII groupings but I suspect that they were referring to the Flying R in a rectangle. Please feel free to respond if you know the answer.

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Unless the Robbins Company records are available, I know of no other way to determine the exact dates of manufacture. We know that the rectangular "flying R" hallmark was used in the post WWII period because there are hall marks on badges made after WWII. Was it used late war? I don't know- maybe. If found in WWII Veterans possessions that might be an indication.  Postwar use, for sure - like on the master parachutist shown below. The earliest hallmark I know of is the incised hallmark that appears on certain pin back insignia as shown on the examples below. Robbins used several different hallmarks and made a lot of insignia, especially for the Boy Scouts.

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Early Robbins mark.jpg

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Thanks TC. The post that I saw referring to the Flying R hallmark in veterans groupings was from 2014. I made a note in my reference book citing it but I was a little unclear which Flying R was being referred to. I know there was an incised one attributed to about 1922. The Flying R inside the rectangle is raised and post war according to the reference book I have on airborne wings. I don’t recall who made the post from 2014. I was hoping that they might see my post and clarify what they had said then. If there is a question about the time period of the rectangle Flying R hopefully it can be cleared up. Then again there may be nothing to clear up. I’ll go back to see who posted that and share where it’s at. Thanks again. 

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On 9/11/2014 at 8:26 PM, Allan H. said:

I was once having a discussion with Don Burgett, WWII 506th PIR veteran and author of "Currahee!" He had a brother who was a paratrooper and was killed in action during WWII. Don's brother's jump wing was one of these Robbins jump wings with the winged R hallmark. I have spent over 35 years chasing jump wings now and have located these Winged R hallmarked wings in other WWII groupings, so my conclusion is that both the Robbins Attleboro and the Winged R hallmark are legitimate WWII vintage parachute badges.

 

I will also say that my opinion doesn't need to be the only one that matters. I simply believe that the hallmark dates to WWII. Oh yeah, if anyone says they talked to somebody at Robbins about the hallmark and were told 1950's, I can tell you that back in the early 1980's (yes 1980's), I had a number of telephone conversations with the secretary who had been working at Robbins for over 40 years back then. She scoured the Robbins records and couldn't find a specific date when this logo was used. She kept telling me to call back and that she would keep looking. She was a sweet old lady. She never came up with anyone definite. She was also the person that everyone else that I talked to at Robbins told me to talk to. I would guess that she knew her stuff.

 

EDIT- Fabio- the wing is an original. It is up to you to decide whether or not you think it is WWII.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Allan 


This is the post I was referring to from 2014. After reading it again I guess it’s up to each collector to decide for themselves whether the wings they have hallmarked this way are from WWII or not. 
WR

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