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The Combat Infantryman Badge


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Great badge, theater made and named to boot!

 

Thanks for showing it, I would love to have a badge like that in my collection!

 

Travis

 

Here's an interesting theater made example. It measures 2 inches across and is marked "Made in Japan N.E. (don't really know what this means) Luzon P.I. Felix R. Ricabo". Any thoughts on why there are 2 locations listed on the back? And is there anyway to find some information on the soldier that this was made for?

Actively seeking 6th Infantry Regiment items from all eras.

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Check out the rest of my Afghan made patches here --> https://travismcbride.smugmug.com/AFG-2018/n-cKpBwN

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World War II British made CIB. This "sterling" marked pin-back badge is unique in its' musket and wreath design. A light blue paint is utilized for the musket's background. I do not know the maker of this badge but it is difficult to find.

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Hello,

 

I am looking for a Combat Infantryman Badge and an Expert Infantryman Badge made by the J. Balme Company in Paris. These were made out of sterling silver in the early 90's and have the fancy detailed scroll work on the buttstock of the musket. I bought one of the CIB versions back in the early 90's and sold it to a fellow member a couple years back (I could kick myself for doing that :wacko: ).

 

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The reason I want to get an example of each (CIB & EIB) is for my son since he'll be testing for his EIB soon and will likely end up earning his CIB as well, once he's deployed to Afghanistan. He always liked my fancy J. Balme version as a kid and would love to have a fancy one to wear on his uniform as well. The problem is that these things are so rare that I can't find any! The few people that do have one, don't want to part with them. I've seen some handmade knock-offs being sold online but they are really bad quality. If anybody is willing to sell one, or knows of somebody that would, please let me know. Name your price! :excl:

 

Thanks!

 

John

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Recently aquired this CIB marked NS Meyer Inc New york, only problem is the entire maker mark is reversed (reads from right to left) The sterling mark and halmarks are normal. Not sure how this could even happen....any ideas on what it does to the value??post-104892-0-80708300-1353530580_thumb.jpg

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Very unusual, but I don't think it would have more than curiosity value to a collector. The style of hallmark dates it to the early 60s.

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Here are two examples of German made CIBs in my collection. One is hallmarked L. CHR. LAUER Nuremburg. The other is not, but is made in the same way. The one with the hallmark is just slightly thinner than the one without. Both badges came from the same vet, who was a guard at the war trials in Nuremburg with the 16th Reg of the 1st Infantry Division. To my knowledge this is the only marked one known. I paid an arm for one and a leg for the other!

 

 

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Here are 3 CIB's made by the "Hayward" company and are all marked "STERLING" as well. All have the musket affixed by rivets much like a German Cross award. They are super in detail and all 3 different. The two second awards have two different stars affixed, one small star the same size as are on my "STERLING SB" (Silverman Brothers) CIB's as well as one I have marked "E & H Simon, STERLING G1" and one large star unlike anything else I have. I have a duplicate of the small star Hayward and bot the Simon and Silverman Brothers marked badges. These are for trade only on other CIB's I do not have. I also have duplicate two piece ones, both variations I know of as well as the English badges.

 

I am a serious collector of CIB's and will buy collections to get ones I do not have. I have over 300 CIB's now, not all different of course but a load of different ones. I am looking for bullion ones with the ribbon bars on the same piece of cloth and bullion ones I do not have.

 

Larry Pistole

PistolePete

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Here's an interesting theater made example. It measures 2 inches across and is marked "Made in Japan N.E. (don't really know what this means) Luzon P.I. Felix R. Ricabo". Any thoughts on why there are 2 locations listed on the back? And is there anyway to find some information on the soldier that this was made for?



It s Gapan, not Japan. Gapan City is a fourth class city in the province of Nueva Ecija, Philippines (Wikipedia). Felix R. Ricabo was likely either the maker or a Filipino soldier serving with Americans.
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It s Gapan, not Japan. Gapan City is a fourth class city in the province of Nueva Ecija, Philippines (Wikipedia). Felix R. Ricabo was likely either the maker or a Filipino soldier serving with Americans.

 

Thank you sir for the information. You're totally correct, I'm not sure how I missed that.

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Hello,

 

here are three "odd" CIBs

 

The first one is pin back and sterling marked, British Made I think

 

I don't know about the second... it's a clutch back and also sterling marked. According to the reverse it seems molded and the pins are of the longer type. Also foreign made?

 

The third is a screw back, stamp from a thin metal sheet. Could it be Italian?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

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Based on the prices as of late, these under-valued badges are finally being recognized for the wonderful pieces of history they really are. Nice pieces in this thread.

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Always looking for 78th Division patch variations, medal groups & uniforms from WWI or WWII.

 

307th Field Artillery - "The poor, unfortunate grunt needs to actually see his target. All we need is a zip code"...

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I found this picture of LTC James D. Herndon in the 1968 Command & General Staff College yearbook. He is wearing a CIB with 2 stars. However, his ribbons don't indicate any WWII service and I cannot find him listed on the National Infantry Museum's list of three time recipients. Any thoughts? It's hard to imagine an active duty officer would blatantly wear this if he wasn't entitled since the two stars would probably stick out like a sore thumb. I wonder if the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal was for the Dominican Republic and he mistakenly thought he was entitled to a CIB for Korea, Vietnam and the Dom. Rep.

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Here is an image of a CIB that I just picked up. It is undoubtedly WWII vintage (based on the circumstances that I received it), but you can see that the color of the enamel is much lighter blue than what is normally encountered.

 

If you take a good look at the back side of the badge, you will see that it is stamped and that the badge is vaulted for a smoother appearance when it is being worn. The material that it is made of appears to be sterling silver. It is not steel.

 

Allan

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Never under-estimate the power of prayer.

 

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I found this picture of LTC James D. Herndon in the 1968 Command & General Staff College yearbook. He is wearing a CIB with 2 stars. However, his ribbons don't indicate any WWII service and I cannot find him listed on the National Infantry Museum's list of three time recipients. Any thoughts? It's hard to imagine an active duty officer would blatantly wear this if he wasn't entitled since the two stars would probably stick out like a sore thumb. I wonder if the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal was for the Dominican Republic and he mistakenly thought he was entitled to a CIB for Korea, Vietnam and the Dom. Rep.

 

And especially one that's in attendance at this major school, 1968, so it is most odd, was the criterias already in place regarding the multiple awards of the CIB? by 1968 they would have to be right?

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