Jump to content

The Combat Infantryman Badge


Steve B.
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...

I have pictures of soldiers preparing for a patrol. One is wearing an Expert Infantry Badge and a second wearing a Combat Infantry Badge. No unit insignia in sight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Russians loved to wear their medals during combat, and some didn't wear helmets as it gave a tough-guy impression. Not my style, but I suppose if it's your keister on the line you can make your own decisions on what's stylish at the front. :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dogfacedsoldier

A G.I. told me during the war, some units issued CIB's to the new men coming in the line. I would guess the theory was that if they get killed in their first action, they earned the badge. They were few rules governing the awarding of the CIB. Cav. troops didn't get them, because they weren't Infantry, but by Korea they did. Yet they did authorize the CIB to units that were not Infantry. An example of this was the Battle of the Bulge. Some units attached to Infantry units also recieved them. I have an engineer jacket from the CBI, where the man fought with the Marauders, two or three engineer units were involved, because the Marauders were short troops, these guys became infantry. The units in the Mars Task force, the 124th Cav. were issued CIB's. The 473rd had all been AA units. Depending on who was in charge, units were awarded the CIBs. Patton himself awarded CIB's to a unit coming back from a patrol. This was on a "Shootout!" I have also seen quite a few pictures of CIB's being worn in Combat, these were from late war in a unit history. I can't rememeber the unit, but they were one of those who entered combat late.

 

 

Jon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was it Patton who stated that he'd give up all of his medals in trade for one of these badges?

 

If you consider the time period these photos were taken, the CIB was a brand new award and one of the most coveted in the Army, by enlisted men and officers alike. If you really look closely at many photos of US Infantrymen during WWII, you'll see quite a few of the badges in wear. The badges were a great source of pride then and one reason the subdued version in cloth is still worn into combat today.

 

Of all the awards and decorations my father earned during WWII, he was most proud of his CIB and I'm sure the men in these photos are simply stating the fact that they've earned a little respect. My two cents.

 

Gary

 

...and it was worth a few points under the ARS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A G.I. told me during the war, some units issued CIB's to the new men coming in the line. I would guess the theory was that if they get killed in their first action, they earned the badge. They were few rules governing the awarding of the CIB. Cav. troops didn't get them, because they weren't Infantry, but by Korea they did. Yet they did authorize the CIB to units that were not Infantry. An example of this was the Battle of the Bulge. Some units attached to Infantry units also recieved them. I have an engineer jacket from the CBI, where the man fought with the Marauders, two or three engineer units were involved, because the Marauders were short troops, these guys became infantry. The units in the Mars Task force, the 124th Cav. were issued CIB's. The 473rd had all been AA units. Depending on who was in charge, units were awarded the CIBs. Patton himself awarded CIB's to a unit coming back from a patrol. This was on a "Shootout!" I have also seen quite a few pictures of CIB's being worn in Combat, these were from late war in a unit history. I can't rememeber the unit, but they were one of those who entered combat late.

Jon

 

RE: ..."the 473rd had all been AA units".... Here's more to the story than that line.

 

Yes, the 473rd was cobbled together from the 434th, 435th, 532nd and 900th AAA Bns, as well as the HQ of the 2nd Armored Gp. The regiment had a separate activation ( 14 Jan 45) and had 31 days of accelerated infantry training. They were led into combat by none other than Col. William Yarborough, of 509th fame. The regiment replaced one of two IRs in the 92nd ID. The 473rd fought in the Serchio Valley beginning in Feb 45. By early Apr 45, the regiment was undergoing more infantry trng at Montecantini. The CO of the 2nd Bn was KIA at the Gothic Line. The regiment fought into Massa, across the Frigido, suffering heavy casualties. Many companies were reduced in strength to rifile platoons. Incurring more heavy casualties in mid-April, the CO of the 1st Bn was among those KIA. Finally crossing the Gothic Line in late April, the regiment continued the fight at Genoa. It was inactivated in Rome 14 Sept 45.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would guess that the pictures are staged (where the guys appear to be in combat) or in areas of small risk of enemy fire. Seems rather unusual that anyone would want to have an item sparkling in the sun attracting attention.

That, and maybe pix taken JUST following being awarded in the field?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
notinfringed

Here are some more I picked up a few months ago, and a couple EIB's as well.

 

post-2011-1223142291.jpg

post-2011-1223142307.jpg

 

My pictures aren't so great, but the top two are marked with a raised sterling. as is the first EIB. The other two are modern.

 

Levi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are pictures of the only one I have. I assume it to be modern, but I don't know. The marking on the back says J Balme France. I assume the clutches are replacements. They look like the clutches found on tie tacks. I have some of the same style of clutches on older insignia, but these look very new. Any input would be much appreciated.

post-2011-1208927467.jpg

post-2011-1208927483.jpg

Thanks

Levi

 

Man, that is beautiful. I would love to get one like that to wear on my Class A's or Dress Blues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well here's one of my CMB's or actually two.
It's an ordinary CMB pinback marked sterling placed on a cloth one with the background of the middle section of the 90th infantry division emblem. I never seen one in the same way before.

Christian

The three No_outside_hosting Photos are no longer available.

 

post-50776-0-13786300-1399755535.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are pictures of the only one I have. I assume it to be modern, but I don't know. The marking on the back says J Balme France. I assume the clutches are replacements. They look like the clutches found on tie tacks. I have some of the same style of clutches on older insignia, but these look very new. Any input would be much appreciated.

post-2011-1208927467.jpg

post-2011-1208927483.jpg

Thanks

Levi

Made in France ! I have never seen one made by Balme before. I also assume it is modern day but this is gorgeous item !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a Meyer CMB from the WWI/WWII group of Adelbert Callander, a surgeon serving in Guadalcanal and Okinawa. Sorry about the shadow, for some reason the camera won't focus on a zoom this time around.

 

-Ski

post-3043-1223161792.jpg

post-3043-1223161798.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a Meyer CMB from the WWI/WWII group of Adelbert Callander, a surgeon serving in Guadalcanal and Okinawa. Sorry about the shadow, for some reason the camera won't focus on a zoom this time around.

 

-Ski

 

Ski,

 

That's a beautiful piece. I love the way the central motif is overlaid. Great effect!! First one I've seen like it. thumbsup.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Hi,I would like to know if there is any particular regulation concernig the wear of the metal subdued CIB.Is it authorized for wear also on the field?is there any picture of soldiers wearing it on their field uniforms?what about the Vitenam war era?ANy pics realting to that war?I would also like to know if today the wear of the CIB or the CAB in subdued metal is authorized on the ACU uniforms.Any informations and pictures about this subject will be greatly appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Subdued qualification badges (parachute badge, aviator badge, CIB, EIB, CMB, etc.) are the only badges authorized on the ACU. However, they are not allowed to be worn while deployed, just in garrison.

 

Prior to the ACU, the metal badges were interchangeable with the cloth sew-on versions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just picked up my first CIB and Im not sure of the year made or vintage, it is a clutch back with just the number 10 on the back, whats different about this one is the rifle is a separate piece , very 3D looking, does anyone know if this is a WWII characteristic or what era this CIB was made...its very interesting, thanks for any info....mike

post-350-1224291176.jpg

post-350-1224291200.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just picked up my first CIB and Im not sure of the year made or vintage, it is a clutch back with just the number 10 on the back, whats different about this one is the rifle is a separate piece , very 3D looking, does anyone know if this is a WWII characteristic or what era this CIB was made...its very interesting, thanks for any info....mike

post-350-1224291363.jpg

post-350-1224291379.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Def. an odd looking CIB. Not that it's much of a clue, but does the clasp have 'dimples' on it or is it plain? That might give us a little bit of a clue, although not a conclusive one.

 

It's a cool looking CIB tho!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure what the clasp is or dimples but here are a few more shots!..the two clasp things?one says made in the USA, appears newer than the other one, it says Ballou Reg'd..the two prongs that are on the badge itself, one has an edge near the top the other doesnt......thanks!!!....mike

post-350-1224427033.jpg

post-350-1224427064.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am NOT an expert on CIB's for sure, BTW. That first clasp with 3 dimples looks newer made. The other one probably belongs with the CIB.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see lots of these subdued metal CIB's dated from around 1969 on e-Bay but I have never actually heard of them being worn on jungle fatigues or olive green utilities. Does anyone have any photos or other evidence of how they were actually worn back then or even on BDU's? The only time I can recall seeing them actually worn prior to the ACU was by General Schwarzkopff on his desert BDU's and even when he wore them they seemed a little odd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Subdued metal badges, wings, etc. were definitely worn on fatigues and BDUs, but they are a pain to put on and take off constantly, plus the blackening wears off so most preferred to have the embroidered badges sewn on.

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.