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Unusual Leather M1 Carbine Carry Case


pwcosol
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A couple of weeks back found the pictured heavy leather M1 carbine case at a bi-annual military collector show.  The similarity to the web, WWII issue cases is apparent. Don't see any markings other than what looks like the owner's name and possibly a service number ink stamped in three places along the underside of the sling. Thoughts?

 

 

Lea M1 CCCs 1.JPG

Lea M1 CCCs 2.JPG

Lea M1 CCCs 3.JPG

Lea M1 CCCs 4.JPG

Lea M1 CCCs 5.JPG

Lea M1 CCCs 6.JPG

Lea M1 CCCs 7.JPG

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My opinion is this is not a military case.  Does it have a lining?

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com

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No lining present. Happened to speak w/a friend yesterday and he mentioned have seen a couple cases years ago which might have been similar the the one I have. He said they were for the German BGS Alpine troops whom were issued M1 carbines during the 1950s. I recall seeing a few of these USGI/German issued carbines maybe 30 years ago. Never was very many of them. I think over on G'Boards.com Forum, there is a BGS sub-forum so will take a look...

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Backtheattack

When I had a first look it remembers me to an old regular carriing case. Bavarian Police used the M1 Carbine, too, there is a bavarian manual from the early 60th " Anleitung über Handhabung, Behandlung, Pflege und Lagerung von US Polizeiwaffen", (instructions for handling, treatment, care and storage of US police weapons), printed by "Bayerisches Beschaffungsamt für Polizeiausrüstung" (bavarian procurement office for police equipment). Leather was for a long time a material for equipment used by police.

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Thanks Gents for your input. Will ferret around a bit and see if I come up with anything...

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sleeplessnashadow

Interesting carry case. Someone kindly poked me to look in on this post. I'm the researcher who authored BavarianM1Carbines.com. My focus has shifted the past 5 years to research and web pages for USCarbineCal30.com but I still have an interest in the U.S. carbines used by Germany and Austria during and after the occupation.

 

Use of he U.S. carbines by the West German BGS is not something I've looked into.  I don't doubt it, just haven't come across it. The U.S. Military Government (OMGUS) records I found didn't mention them but the occupation ended in 1955.

 

What I've seen with the police in Bavaria, Hessen, Bremen, and Wurttemberg-Baden/Baden-Wurttemberg from 1945-1955 was they had to make do with whatever OMGUS or local U.S. military forces provided them with. Which wasn't much so they resourced accessories from German and Italian weapons of WWII for use with the U.S. carbines. German production after 1955 included ammo, magazines, and accessories for the carbines. They remained in service into the 1960's then were held in reserve thru the 70's in some areas. Same was true of the carbines provided to the gendarme in Austria.

 

Almost all leather gear for the Austrians 1955-1970 was mfg by Stolla & Sons in Vienna. They placed the Stolla name/logo on the leather slings, mag pouches, and other leather goods they made.

 

The police in West Germany used leather accessories dyed black. Some of the carbine mag pouches they used were mfg by GECO and had the GECO name/logo. Some had no markings. I haven't seen any black leather carbine slings.

 

This case may have been made for the BGS. A copy of the U.S. equivalent. German Federal government agencies often placed an acceptance mark on items they had made for the carbines. This one having no markings other than what appears to be an officer's name isn't unusual with other accessories I've seen.

 

Sorry I can't help more.

 

Jim

 

 

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Thanks for your appraisal, Jim. My own "ferreting" came to naught. Took about 30 minutes cleaning the case and treating it with a very lite application of "Blackrock", which was sorely needed. In looking at the name inked under the sling, I thought the first might be "William", but upon closer examination believe it could be something like "Wilhelm".  I appreciate you clarifying the time line of police and military forces after WW2. I know the allies initially resurrected the German police organization and ultimately turned over a number of their duties to them. Regarding Austrian material, not surprised much of it was produced by Stolla, Wien, as I have seen their trademarks on a number of items made just before or during WW2.

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