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Lieutenant General DAVID E. GRANGE, JR. 9 April 1925 -11 Sept, 2022.


triplecanopy
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triplecanopy

It is with great sadness that I share the news on the passing of a true Ranger Legend, LTG David E. Grange, Jr.  

It is hard to overstate the impact and legacy of LTG Grange.  He served as a paratrooper in Europe in WWII, an Airborne Infantryman in Korea, an Airborne Ranger and Paratrooper in multiple tours in Vietnam, and as Director of the Ranger Department, just to touch on his distinguished service.  

His contributions to the Ranger Community extend far beyond his active duty service, as evident by the naming of the Best Ranger Competition in his honor. I couldn't articulate it better than our comrades at The National Ranger Association: 

"For 97 years, this man gave every ounce of his life back to his family, his community, and his country. Through his dedicated service to others, he in turn designed a legacy for us to receive as individuals, as soldiers, and as an entire community. He is THE Standard. The legend of the game.

Even in our grief of never seeing him on this side of the Earth, his spirit will always be felt and forever revered. To our Airborne Ranger in the sky, rest now. You've led the way."

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triplecanopy

Thanks RD12 for posting those photos of LTG Grange. The Photo on the left was taken in Vietnam when he commanded 3rd Brigade 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) (circa 1971). In his next assignment, he was Director of The Ranger Department (71-73) at Fort Benning and later still as a two star general he commanded the Infantry School at Fort Benning. Photo on the right is when he commanded The US 6th Army.  He was a great leader, superb warrior, fine gentleman and a role model for all who knew him. Rangers Lead the Way Sir!

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triplecanopy

The soldier for whom the Army’s Best Ranger Competition is named passed away Sept. 11 at age 97.

Retired Lt. Gen. David E. Grange, Jr. served in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. He enlisted in 1943 and commissioned in 1950 after attending Officer Candidate School.

During World War II, Grange served as a paratrooper with the 517th Parachute Infantry Regiment. He played a role in the Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, Ardennes, and Central Europe campaigns. When the war ended, he was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division before going to OCS.

Upon commissioning as a 2nd lieutenant, Grange was sent to Korea as a rifle platoon leader with the 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment. After Korea, he was a Ranger instructor and served as an Army staff officer, according to the Association of the U.S. Army.

In 1963, he entered his third war as an adviser in Vietnam on his first of three tours to the country. Grange’s second and third tours were spent with the 506th Infantry Regiment and 101st Airborne Division. He served as Director of the Ranger Department and later as CG of the Infantry School. His last post was as commanding general of the Sixth U.S. Army.

He was one of the few recipients of the 3rd award of the Combat Infantryman Badge or CIB.

He retired in 1984 with 41 years of service.

Grange was highly decorated, with awards including the “Defense Distinguished Service Medal; Army Distinguished Service Medal; Silver Star with two Oak Leaf Clusters; Legion of Merit with one Oak Leaf Cluster; Distinguished Flying Cross; Soldier’s Medal; 28 awards of the Air Medal with V; Bronze Star Medal with V and four Oak Leaf Clusters; Joint Service Commendation Medal with V; United States Army Commendation Medal with V and four Oak Leaf Clusters; Air Force Commendation Medal; and the Purple Heart” He was also awarded the master parachutist badge with two combat jump stars, CIB with two stars and the coveted Ranger Tab.

“France has awarded him the Legion of Honor in the degree of Officer.” “Korea has awarded General Grange the Wharang Medal with Gold Star, the Kuksun Medal and the Cheonsu Medal. Vietnam awarded him the Gallantry Cross with two palms and Silver Star, and the Military Honor Medal, First Class.”

In 1984, the “LTG David E. Grange, Jr. Best Ranger Competition” was named in his honor.

Reposted from the Army Times

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In 1979 I was attending the ANCOC (Advanced NCO Course) at FT Benning GA. I had the opportunity to meet General Grange while there. Here is photograph of me shaking his hand. I was totally impressed.  SKIP

20220914_190413.jpg

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melvin biddle was at my table at an 82nd abn. convention dinner, he was in the 517th in ww2 and was awarded the medal of honor, he was telling us he had recently seen general grange (1980) and that they were in the same platoon in ww2 the general was then a private and mr. biddle was a private first class, he said he enjoyed reminding the general that he out ranked him at one time.

      I also remember hearing that gen. grange was the last person to make a combat jump in ww2 that was still on jump status.

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