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Captain John Francis Quinn Jr. Scout Plane Pilot, U.S.S. San Francisco, Attu, Kiska, Wake Island, Makin, Beto, Kwajalein, Saipan, Iwo Jima, Okinawa


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Captain John Francis Quinn Jr.

United States Navy

Scout Plane Pilot, U.S.S. San Francisco

World War Two: Attu, Kiska, Wake Island, Makin, Beto, Kwajalein, Saipan, Iwo Jima, Okinawa

John Francis Quinn Jr. was born in Utica, New York, on May 7, 1917.  He lived in Whitesboro, New York and was a 1934 graduate of Whitesboro High School. Quinn was a 1939 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. After graduation he served aboard the U.S.S. Nashville and the U.S.S. Eliot. Quinn received his flight training at the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, Naval Air Station Miami, Florida and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida. On February 1, 1943 Quinn was transferred from the Naval Air Station Norfolk, Virginia, to serve as a scout plane pilot aboard the U.S.S San Francisco. Quinn flew the SOC Seagull a single-engine scout observation biplane in a seaplane configuration. The seaplane was launched by catapult and recovered from a sea landing by hoisting it aboard the ship. The wings folded back against the fuselage for storage aboard ship. Cruiser flotillas often had to sail without aircraft carriers. When they did, cruiser floatplanes were their only eyes. Cruisers gave up some of their deck space to a seaplane hanger, allowing them to carry four to eight seaplanes. The San Francisco was a New-Orleans class cruiser commissioned in 1934. She was one of the most decorated ships of World War Two earning seventeen battle stars. Quinn served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters during World War Two. He received seven campaign stars for his Asiatic-Pacific campaign medal. He was involved in Attu, Kiska, Wake Island, Makin, Beto, Kwajalein, Saipan, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. After the end of the war, the 7th Fleet moved its headquarters to Qingdao, China. Five major task forces managed operations in the Western Pacific. Quinn was part of Chinese Convoy Group DE/AM. He was awarded the Special Breast Order of Yun Hui and the Chinese Order of the Resplendent Banner 6th class and a pair of Chinese Air Force wings by the Nationalist Chinese Government. Chinese on the clutch back wings translates to “Issued by Chinese Air Force Central Command” the top right characters say “Made by Zhongmei”. Zhong translates to China, Mei translates to America. Quinn then served on the U.S.S. Charles R. Ware and he was the Captain of the U.S.S. Glennon. Captain John F. Quinn Jr. retired from the United States Navy on August 31, 1959. John Francis Quinn Jr. died at Martin, Florida, on February 19, 1994.

 

The Curtiss SOC Seagull was a United States single-engine scout observation biplane aircraft, designed by Alexander Solla of the Curtiss Wright Corporation for the United States Navy. The aircraft served on battleships and cruisers in a seaplane configuration, being launched by catapult and recovered from a sea landing. The wings folded back against the fuselage for storage aboard ship.

 

U.S.S. San Francisco was a New-Orleans class cruiser commissioned in 1934, she was one of the most decorated ships of World War Two earning seventeen battle stars.

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Interesting career and group.  Even more interesting is that I am a 1976 graduate of Whitesboro, NY, High School.  Though the actual building I attended dates to the 1960s. 

Mikie 

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Amazing group. This group illustrates how hard it could be to earn a decoration in the USN during WWII.  All that flying ETC, and not even an Air Medal or a Commendation Ribbon.

 

Kurt 

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