Jump to content

WW1 KJ Mk II Gas Grenade


GLCC74
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here is another WW1 era item, a KJ (Stannic Chloride) Mk II grenade. These started production in early 1918, during development there were issues with the bodies failing testing as they were designed without knowing the contents, so once the desired gas had been chosen, the required pressure was obtained during manufacturing and testing was successful. By December of 1918, close to a million had been made with around 250,000 sent overseas. The grenades main use was to clear bunkers or similar structures and the gas dissipated fairly quickly allowed for friendly forces to occupy the captured areas. Grenades are typically painted grey and may or may not have stenciling to indicate filling material. Unlike the Mk V models, which has holes to allow for the gas to come out, the Mk II had a detonator that burst the cannister open. These models are harder to find than the later MK V models.

IMG_4413.thumb.jpg.3e52d81c50f0e0b29b001824a7523a11.jpg

IMG_4416.thumb.jpg.20eb2ebc9dd32d587a53001966db384c.jpg

IMG_4417.thumb.JPG.f2e4dbed1460e229c7bed875c6fb7a48.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a problem, I don't have too many more rare US types from WW1 as there really was not a lot, I do have a lot of European ones, some of which the US troops did use. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a lot of these that didn't go overseas ended up with law enforcement....I also remember seeing a photo of these in the back of Bonnie and Clyde's vehicle after the police gunned them down...Those may have come from the armory they robbed.....Bodes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't doubt it. Although the numbers show that some did make it overseas, it was more likely that we were using the French and British items more simply due to logistics and familiarity. Our industry took so long to get going, by the time we were up and rolling the war was over. Do you still have the photo? Would like to see that. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, GLCC74 said:

I don't doubt it. Although the numbers show that some did make it overseas, it was more likely that we were using the French and British items more simply due to logistics and familiarity. Our industry took so long to get going, by the time we were up and rolling the war was over. Do you still have the photo? Would like to see that. 

I think it was film footage instead of a still photo....Believe I saw it on the History Channel, but unable to find it on You Tube....IF I find it, I will post the link...Bodes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks! Always interested in seeing period images or video of the ordnance. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, GLCC74 said:

Thanks! Always interested in seeing period images or video of the ordnance. 

Having one is what drew my attention to those in the old film footage.....It's not quite as nice as yours, and has a small slit cut into the side....Figured this was how they dewat it.....Bodes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Bodes said:

Having one is what drew my attention to those in the old film footage.....It's not quite as nice as yours, and has a small slit cut into the side....Figured this was how they dewat it.....Bodes

Remembering Bonnie & Clyde, full show. - Bing video......35:46 into the documentary, they show a cache of weapons including some of these gas grenades....Bodes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for posting the link to the documentary, was very interesting to watch. I did see the grenades as well.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...