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Civilian Internees PTO


Jimnz
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Hello

I was reading my old copy of Robles on US awards and have always been intrigued by his reference to the wear of the Asia-Pacific  ribbon (  at the point as the medal hadn't been struck)  by civilian internees in the Santo Thomas camp in the Philippines in WW2. This was authorized by an  order in May 1945 I assume by General MacArthur  so it is quite official. I'd like to know more about this. Does anyone have a copy of the order and a photo of  it's wear by an internee.  Especially did the the Army authorize the full size medal to be issued later? And if so I am assuming the WW2 Victory would not be issued as well. 

All the best

Jim

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Thanks for that. It seems to be more targeted and not a blanket thing. Interesting.

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Allan H.

I've got a very real and interesting story about this. I was an ROTC cadet in 1985 when I ran across a senior officer at FT Leavenworth wearing a PTO ribbon. By 1985, there were very few Korean War veterans let alone WWII vets since a WWII veteran would have been around 65 years old at the time. This guy was only in his forties. The other unusual thing about his ribbons was a lack or other WWII ribbons.  I had to stop and ask him about his PTO ribbon. It turns out that his dad was a US officer and his mother was pregnant wit him when the Philippines fell. This guy was born in captivity! I was amazed by the story. The officer even pulled out a card that he evidently had to carry with him, showing that he was authorized to wear the ribbon.

 

Truth can be stranger than fiction.

 

Allan

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Hi that's an amazing story. I wonder if he wore the medal or if only the ribbon was authorized. That card he carried would be interesting.

Thanks

Jim

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Hermanus
20 hours ago, Allan H. said:

I've got a very real and interesting story about this. I was an ROTC cadet in 1985 when I ran across a senior officer at FT Leavenworth wearing a PTO ribbon. By 1985, there were very few Korean War veterans let alone WWII vets since a WWII veteran would have been around 65 years old at the time. This guy was only in his forties. The other unusual thing about his ribbons was a lack or other WWII ribbons.  I had to stop and ask him about his PTO ribbon. It turns out that his dad was a US officer and his mother was pregnant wit him when the Philippines fell. This guy was born in captivity! I was amazed by the story. The officer even pulled out a card that he evidently had to carry with him, showing that he was authorized to wear the ribbon.

 

Truth can be stranger than fiction.

 

Allan

 

What a remarkable coincidence and what a great story. 

 

Regards 

Herman 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Robles also states the Philippines Liberation Ribbon was authorised  ..is this documented as well?

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Allan H.

The Philippines Liberation ribbon would have been awarded by the Philippines, so I would assume that they would have had to provide the order authorizing its wear. I can tell you with great certainty that the man that I met was not wearing a Philippine Liberation ribbon along with the PTO ribbon. I would assume that had he been authorized to wear it, he would have done so.

 

Allan

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Thanks for that information...nothing beats actual eyes on experience..it makes sense the Philippines Liberation ribbon would not have been issued..

 

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