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Vietnam era blades from helicopter gunner


P-59A
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These are at a surplus store I go to. Owners son told me a Vietnam vet came in with all his gear with paper work and photos two weeks ago. Someone came in and bought everything. The blades were pulled from the grouping and put in the office. Blades are not my deal. What is fair market on these?

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  • 3 weeks later...
dustin

WWII manufactured Mark I knives, late war types. Also, two of the most common types. Value is subjective and all over the board. The Camillus is a nice one, could fetch $100 or perhaps more or less. My general rule is that any Mark I in really good shape is worth $75. Dealers ask much more but they do sit on them a very long time. I think anything over a 100 they are very slow movers or not at all, for these two pictured here. Other types in the uncommon category command better pricing. Do an eBay completed listing for Camillus and Colonial Mark I, then you'll get an idea. 

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15 hours ago, dustin said:

WWII manufactured Mark I knives, late war types. Also, two of the most common types. Value is subjective and all over the board. The Camillus is a nice one, could fetch $100 or perhaps more or less. My general rule is that any Mark I in really good shape is worth $75. Dealers ask much more but they do sit on them a very long time. I think anything over a 100 they are very slow movers or not at all, for these two pictured here. Other types in the uncommon category command better pricing. Do an eBay completed listing for Camillus and Colonial Mark I, then you'll get an idea. 

Thanks for the info. That Colonial is one of the cheepest made military knives I had ever seen.  Thanks again.

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dustin

The Colonial is certainly different and unique from the rest but I wouldn't say "cheap". Flat ground blades were used by other manufactures and a common practice, but I assume you are more referencing the handle. It was an ingenious application as it doesn't corrode, expand and shrink, rust, nothing to accumulate mildew and mold. Before the BuOrd awarded contracts, this handle design was subjected to a stringent series of tests after which passed with flying colors. Consider these knives are over 70 years old, very rarely do you see them chipped or cracked. There will be divots and dings but nothing significant. So I would say they are far from cheap, perhaps not as elegant in assembly as the Camillus you have sitting there. Almost a perfect concept for the corrosive environment of sea going personnel. The blade treatment on this example is almost gone. Also consider the whole assembly process, the Camillus has a steel guard, stacked leather washers, pommel and milled split locking nut. This all takes time to assemble, costs money and has more logistics involved. For Colonial, once the blade and tang were forged, it was only essentially one process to then mold a handle with integral guard and pommel. Injection molding like this was on the side of industrial revolution during this time to include synthetic materials. So I would look at it more as a testament to ingenuity to meet a war time demand. She won't turn heads at the ball but filled a role of a dependable utility knife.   

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Dustin- Great explanation on the Colonial, and how practical the handle is.  SKIP

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