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My Little War Room, Bursting at the Seams


Fiziwater

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Since I’m winding down from a few years of spirited collecting, and have my war room about as organized as its gonna get, I thought I’d post some pics for posterity.

I only have a 12’ x 13.5’ room to work with, and more stuff than I have room for, so all my loose uniforms will have to remain out of sight in a closet.

But I managed to get most everything else displayed, even using doors when I ran out of wall space.

 

 

 

may1north.JPG.43df7191f77898c38a424603be599cf0.JPG

From left to right, an early-WWII doughboy, a WWII Tommy, a partial WWI doughboy (mannequin too big for his britches), and on the right edge, Sam, a mid-late WWII GI.

Sam has an M1911, made in 1918, tucked into his M3 holster over a 2nd pattern Mackinaw.

 

 

may1corner.JPG.e1b7d7b6f1dcb76b49d869d10b21e504.JPG

Shelf with examples of nine of the ten caps pictured on pages 62-63 of the GI Collectors Guide. The hood for the field jacket, pg 63, is elsewhere in the room.
 On the next shelf are three of the five TL 122 flashlight types in the room, and five WWII first aid pouch types. 
Most of the empty scabbards on display are for bayonets that are mounted elsewhere in the room on British, American and German battle rifles. A few bayonets are at the lower section of those boards. Each mannequin is wearing an appropriate bayonet, whether visible or not.

Just below those are US Army brass and plastic whistles from WWI and WWII. 
Bivouac tools hang below the whistles.

 

 

 

may1table.JPG.040ff974561241b2a06dfdcee2fc4290.JPG

On the May 1944 camp table is an EE-8 A phone set, an SCR-536 Handie-Talkie, marching compass, M1944 goggles in original box,

Next is an August 14, 1944 Life magazine,  a 1942 map of Normandy and issues of Stars and Stripes. The field table is accompanied by a wooden folding field chair.

 

 

may1WWII.JPG.77684b555d3a596686d584c7932a5ad5.JPG

This cabinet contains 11 different variations of aluminum, steel, ethocel and porcelain canteens. Lower shelves hold WWII technical and field manuals for infantry, engineers, ordnance, quartermaster, medical, training, light weapons, vehicle and aircraft recognition and other subjects. I’m in the process of figuring out how to arrange them so most covers will be viewable. Meanwhile, there are a few more manuals I’m still hunting for.

 

 

may1WWI.JPG.1377459aaff0003fc6539c2bbdd25d38.JPG

This top shelf is a display of every variation of the M1910 canteen I’m aware of, except for one, which I hope to acquire this year. Five are pre-WWI, from about 1910 through 1914, and three are from 1917-1918. The two on the left are the same: the earliest type with no reinforcing of the necks. In front of the canteens are one of each caliber round that fits my military pistols and rifles, except the three .50 cals. The shorter round right up against a .50 is a custom ordered 11mm to test fire my 1871/84 Mauser from 1888. The rifle and ammo work fine, but after firing four rounds, at $5.00 per shot, I just couldn’t bring myself to pull the trigger on the remaining 16!
 The shelf below that holds WWI doughboy items, including some 1918 head-stamped .45 rounds, along with some manuals and personal accessories. One item I’m the most appreciative to have found is the pair of unopened Hard Bread tins. A mess kit knife is sitting on the top tin.

The lower shelf holds more WWII manuals.

 

 

may1belts.JPG.825372e19517a2d8c8ecf3aa4c715b0b.JPG

Straddling Sam are doors holding nearly every type of pre-WWI/WWI dismounted and mounted cartridge belt, including two variations of the M1903 1st pattern, M1903 2nd and 3rd patterns, an M1909, the five versions of the M1910, two of the three M1914 types, the NYNG belt, a couple of M1917 types and three variations of the M1918. Some garrison and pistol belts follow.

 

 

may1south.JPG.6ec291e20dd9eee99d97344651cbad93.JPG

This side of the room features the wall of guns, Fritz, my WWII German, a library of military books in cabinets on the left, a cabinet of mostly WWII US Army personal items on the right, and a 1944 folding cot holding tents, blankets, and clothing.

 

 

may1personal.JPG.8d909831811767e02f3653a28ef74851.JPG

This personal-items cabinet also displays a 1941 BYF Luger and a 1944 Walther P38.
The second shelf has a C-3 Argus camera made in 1941, popular with GIs, and known as “The Brick”. Sam, across the room, has the carrying case slung just above his gas mask bag.
 Behind the camera is a red ration book used by my grandparents. Perched on the ration book is a V-mail an uncle sent the family on Oct 19, 1943 from Sicily. It's the original, printed on photographic paper from a micro-film negative. Micro-film images were used to conserve valuable shipping space that tons of actual paper mail would have taken up.

 

 

may1books.JPG.4acd057bac3ff083153e96fffa45f26b.JPG

When I was running out of equipment to buy, and places to put it, I developed an interest in collecting, and reading, 1st editions/1st printings of certain classic military books. These include all six of Hatcher’s books published between 1917 and 1948 (middle of top shelf), and first printings of the 14-volume “American Forces in Action” series, published between 1943 and 1947 (the thin books to the right of the Hatcher books), “America’s Munitions 1917-1918” by Crowell, “The Rifle in America” by Sharpe and others. Other volumes are the typical references for guns, bayonets, uniforms and equipment, and some history. On a shelf not in view to the right are a number war-time issues of Life magazine, Yank, some WWI history books from 1919 and 1921, a 1943 Quartermaster supply catalog and other period publications.

 

 

may1rifles.JPG.d306ffdbf7a2473d533a5fc3829b581d.JPG

The wall of guns are British, American and German shootable battle rifles from the Imperial period, and WWI and WW2 war-time manufacture. Missing is a Krag, which I’ll probably forego. . At the very top is an 1895 Long Lee and at the very bottom is a 1943 Russian Mosin. The 1942 M1 Garand, re-barreled in 1950,  was my very first paid-for collectible, acquired in Jan 2013, and is what launched/propelled/hurled me into avid collecting. The high-numbered 1903 Springfield, made before the armistice in 1918 and re-barreled in 1944, was the final gun I acquired, in Feb 2020.

The M1917 is from 1917 and the carbine has a 1944 receiver and barrel.

 

 

A final note: I haven’t been immune from the foibles of collecting. I’ve naively purchased obvious fakes (none on display), paid too much by not comparison shopping or by just being ignorant and impatient. I’ve waited too long to start educating myself early on. Embarrassing and costly mistakes are good teachers, and I’ve learned the value of acquiring and reading reputable references and asking noobie questions. Learning is one of the most rewarding aspects of collecting, and this forum has contributed to that immeasurably.

 

Due to space limitations, my coats and jackets will remain out-of-sight in a closet, including a real nice WWI US Army overcoat and a named British-made Mackinaw, among other favorites.

I’ve warned my wife that if I ever can find and afford a pair of authentic WWI trench boots, I’m buying a small enough mannequin to wear them, so my WWI doughboy can stand on his own two feet. I’ve gotta have yet one more collection goal to live for!

 

In the meantime, my ongoing mission will be to try and bend the laws of physics so I can display more of my collection than this space wants to allow.

 

 

 

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You made a room that you thought was too small look big and interesting! Great and well planned displays! I imagine that all of us collectors have made collecting foibles that we learn from. Even when you do the research for certain items foibles can happen. But hopefully they’re not costly enough to quit a great hobby! Great room! My room is pretty filled up but as I sit and enjoy the vibe another space and/or idea eventually exposes itself!

 

Regards,

Frank

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Thanks Dean! At first, setting this up was mission impossible. After a number of trial and error sketches on paper, this was pretty much the only arrangement that accommodated all you see.

-Steve in Atlanta

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 A nice collection, and orderly display. Thank you for sharing. I would still love to see some of your other uniforms.

I also have a small space, in total disarray.

 

Tom

 

 

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Tom, these are some of my favorite coats and jackets that I have no room to display.

3623BDDA-297C-4985-9F6A-8202E457D66C.jpeg.bd59d76c2a54302b5482aadb9d431dfb.jpeg

A named 1943 British made Mackinaw with a good tag.

 

6E84B44D-1DDD-4559-A59B-B1DAC212C139.jpeg.53af67336378de0334477227058483a7.jpeg

The Field, Jacket, Pile that’s intended to be worn under a field jacket or parka. Good label but doesn’t contain a date.

 

74DA7570-E8FB-4058-8F43-ACBBA36E5654.jpeg.2efe321042c3978f6b9cc1c32bfa4574.jpeg

A 1944 parka, field, wet weather with a good tag.

 

B0670227-BC37-4D2E-A334-C6E5B7D6E8E6.jpeg.820513aeec6f88bb3d2a206ff499aebb.jpeg

A 1944 raincoat with a good tag.


A 2nd pattern mackinaw and an M41 are on mannequins. 
I have a thing for long and short overcoats too. Can’t explain it!

-Steve in Atlanta

 

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Dave, don’t laugh! I thought about populating the center of this room with the mannequins kind of milling around, to free up the wall space! But I didn’t want to risk a domino effect!!!
-Steve in Atlanta

 

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5 hours ago, Fiziwater said:

Since I’m winding down from a few years of spirited collecting, and have my war room about as organized as its gonna get, I thought I’d post some pics for posterity.

I only have a 12’ x 13.5’ room to work with, and more stuff than I have room for, so all my loose uniforms will have to remain out of sight in a closet.

But I managed to get most everything else displayed, even using doors when I ran out of wall space.

 

 

 

may1north.JPG.43df7191f77898c38a424603be599cf0.JPG

From left to right, an early-WWII doughboy, a WWII Tommy, a partial WWI doughboy (mannequin too big for his britches), and on the right edge, Sam, a mid-late WWII GI.

Sam has an M1911, made in 1918, tucked into his M3 holster over a 2nd pattern Mackinaw.

 

 

may1corner.JPG.e1b7d7b6f1dcb76b49d869d10b21e504.JPG

Shelf with examples of nine of the ten caps pictured on pages 62-63 of the GI Collectors Guide. The hood for the field jacket, pg 63, is elsewhere in the room.
 On the next shelf are three of the five TL 122 flashlight types in the room, and five WWII first aid pouch types. 
Most of the empty scabbards on display are for bayonets that are mounted elsewhere in the room on British, American and German battle rifles. A few bayonets are at the lower section of those boards. Each mannequin is wearing an appropriate bayonet, whether visible or not.

Just below those are US Army brass and plastic whistles from WWI and WWII. 
Bivouac tools hang below the whistles.

 

 

 

may1table.JPG.040ff974561241b2a06dfdcee2fc4290.JPG

On the May 1944 camp table is an EE-8 A phone set, an SCR-536 Handie-Talkie, marching compass, M1944 goggles in original box,

Next is an August 14, 1944 Life magazine,  a 1942 map of Normandy and issues of Stars and Stripes. The field table is accompanied by a wooden folding field chair.

 

 

may1WWII.JPG.77684b555d3a596686d584c7932a5ad5.JPG

This cabinet contains 11 different variations of aluminum, steel, ethocel and porcelain canteens. Lower shelves hold WWII technical and field manuals for infantry, engineers, ordnance, quartermaster, medical, training, light weapons, vehicle and aircraft recognition and other subjects. I’m in the process of figuring out how to arrange them so most covers will be viewable. Meanwhile, there are a few more manuals I’m still hunting for.

 

 

may1WWI.JPG.1377459aaff0003fc6539c2bbdd25d38.JPG

This top shelf is a display of every variation of the M1910 canteen I’m aware of, except for one, which I hope to acquire this year. Five are pre-WWI, from about 1910 through 1914, and three are from 1917-1918. The two on the left are the same: the earliest type with no reinforcing of the necks. In front of the canteens are one of each caliber round that fits my military pistols and rifles, except the three .50 cals. The shorter round right up against a .50 is a custom ordered 11mm to test fire my 1871/84 Mauser from 1888. The rifle and ammo work fine, but after firing four rounds, at $5.00 per shot, I just couldn’t bring myself to pull the trigger on the remaining 16!
 The shelf below that holds WWI doughboy items, including some 1918 head-stamped .45 rounds, along with some manuals and personal accessories. One item I’m the most appreciative to have found is the pair of unopened Hard Bread tins. A mess kit knife is sitting on the top tin.

The lower shelf holds more WWII manuals.

 

 

may1belts.JPG.825372e19517a2d8c8ecf3aa4c715b0b.JPG

Straddling Sam are doors holding nearly every type of pre-WWI/WWI dismounted and mounted cartridge belt, including two variations of the M1903 1st pattern, M1903 2nd and 3rd patterns, an M1909, the five versions of the M1910, two of the three M1914 types, the NYNG belt, a couple of M1917 types and three variations of the M1918. Some garrison and pistol belts follow.

 

 

may1south.JPG.6ec291e20dd9eee99d97344651cbad93.JPG

This side of the room features the wall of guns, Fritz, my WWII German, a library of military books in cabinets on the left, a cabinet of mostly WWII US Army personal items on the right, and a 1944 folding cot holding tents, blankets, and clothing.

 

 

may1personal.JPG.8d909831811767e02f3653a28ef74851.JPG

This personal-items cabinet also displays a 1941 BYF Luger and a 1944 Walther P38.
The second shelf has a C-3 Argus camera made in 1941, popular with GIs, and known as “The Brick”. Sam, across the room, has the carrying case slung just above his gas mask bag.
 Behind the camera is a red ration book used by my grandparents. Perched on the ration book is a V-mail an uncle sent the family on Oct 19, 1943 from Sicily. It's the original, printed on photographic paper from a micro-film negative. Micro-film images were used to conserve valuable shipping space that tons of actual paper mail would have taken up.

 

 

may1books.JPG.4acd057bac3ff083153e96fffa45f26b.JPG

When I was running out of equipment to buy, and places to put it, I developed an interest in collecting, and reading, 1st editions/1st printings of certain classic military books. These include all six of Hatcher’s books published between 1917 and 1948 (middle of top shelf), and first printings of the 14-volume “American Forces in Action” series, published between 1943 and 1947 (the thin books to the right of the Hatcher books), “America’s Munitions 1917-1918” by Crowell, “The Rifle in America” by Sharpe and others. Other volumes are the typical references for guns, bayonets, uniforms and equipment, and some history. On a shelf not in view to the right are a number war-time issues of Life magazine, Yank, some WWI history books from 1919 and 1921, a 1943 Quartermaster supply catalog and other period publications.

 

 

may1rifles.JPG.d306ffdbf7a2473d533a5fc3829b581d.JPG

The wall of guns are British, American and German shootable battle rifles from the Imperial period, and WWI and WW2 war-time manufacture. Missing is a Krag, which I’ll probably forego. . At the very top is an 1895 Long Lee and at the very bottom is a 1943 Russian Mosin. The 1942 M1 Garand, re-barreled in 1950,  was my very first paid-for collectible, acquired in Jan 2013, and is what launched/propelled/hurled me into avid collecting. The high-numbered 1903 Springfield, made before the armistice in 1918 and re-barreled in 1944, was the final gun I acquired, in Feb 2020.

The M1917 is from 1917 and the carbine has a 1944 receiver and barrel.

 

 

 

A final note: I haven’t been immune from the foibles of collecting. I’ve naively purchased obvious fakes (none on display), paid too much by not comparison shopping or by just being ignorant and impatient. I’ve waited too long to start educating myself early on. Embarrassing and costly mistakes are good teachers, and I’ve learned the value of acquiring and reading reputable references and asking noobie questions. Learning is one of the most rewarding aspects of collecting, and this forum has contributed to that immeasurably.

 

Due to space limitations, my coats and jackets will remain out-of-sight in a closet, including a real nice WWI US Army overcoat and a named British-made Mackinaw, among other favorites.

I’ve warned my wife that if I ever can find and afford a pair of authentic WWI trench boots, I’m buying a small enough mannequin to wear them, so my WWI doughboy can stand on his own two feet. I’ve gotta have yet one more collection goal to live for!

 

In the meantime, my ongoing mission will be to try and bend the laws of physics so I can display more of my collection than this space wants to allow.

 

 

 

Which 1910 canteen are you missing?

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This is a fantastic display! And, I appreciate what you said about the expenses of learning this hobby. I feel the same way that you do about sometimes paying more than I should have, and not having the best references at the time. I would bet even the most seasoned experts started that way. Well, good luck in your future collecting.

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Fantastic variety and quality of items.  Superb use of space that displays a broad range of items without it being cluttered.  It is difficult determining what to exhibit and how to properly show it.  Like you, I am still trying to figure out the best way to show all of my Field and Technical Manuals as I have over 200 of them.  The quest continues. 

 

Like most things in life, "experience is what we call our mistakes"!  Live and learn.

 

Thanks for sharing your collection.  It is first class.

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Hookemhorns88, if you figure out a good way to display your plethora of manuals, I'd like to see it.

 

Dave T, pardon my delay in responding. The missing canteen I'm still looking for will have to remain classified for now. It's so rare I'd like to not create competition for myself! Once I get my hands on one, I'll update this thread, and the one that's pinned in canteens. Will try to have that done by the end of the year. Great question.

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