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Does anyone have any information about these ribbons???


romans11servant
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romans11servant

I am asking for any information about the following ribbons:

 

1) Army Infantry / DoD Combat and Expert Infantry Ribbon

2) Army Marksman 3rd Class Ribbon

 

I have them in my collection but I have never found anything about the date they were issued, why they were issued, what branch of service(s) they were issued to, etc. Thank you so much for your assistance!

 

Paul

 

P.S - I did reach out to Eric Bush already but I am hoping others will have the scoop on these two ribbon bars.

 

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Montana40

A great deal of information requested but I am sure you will get some assistance. If you plan on continuing to collect in that area a good investment would be to purchase the book "The call of Duty." It is a invaluable resource that would answer the questions you might have. 

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romans11servant

Outstanding! I was not aware of that book! I am fascinated by US Military history and roiginal militaria items specifically. It's part of our heritage as Americans.

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romans11servant

I didn't find what I was looking for on that website but I never knew that it existed and I've gone ahead and added it to my Military Ribbons resources. 

 

I still and looking for an elaboration on these two ribbon bars please and thank you!

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Hermanus

Please be carefull with the ribbon chart showed.  It is a collection of existent and non-existent ribbons.

 

The Netherlands Orange lanyard ribbon is 100% fantasy. In the Netherlands the lanyard was a lanyard. Full stop. On your side of the Atlantic some money driven militaria supplier invented this ribbon. 

 

I think some more examples like this crept in these charts. I think a CIB was created and not a white Army/DoD Combat and Expert Infantry ribbon.

 

Fantasy pieces mixed with authentic I'm afraid.

 

Regards

Herman 

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ItemCo16527

To follow up on other posts, the Expert/Combat Infantry and Expert/Combat Medical ribbons are fantasy pieces. There are streamers for guidons and flags for Expert/Combat Infantry Battalions and Expert/Combat Medical Battalions, but there is no ribbon bar for either. Please see the below links to the Army's Institute of Heraldry site:

 

https://tioh.army.mil/Catalog/Heraldry.aspx?HeraldryId=15599&CategoryId=9159&grp=2&menu=Uniformed Services

 

https://tioh.army.mil/Catalog/Heraldry.aspx?HeraldryId=15600&CategoryId=9160&grp=2&menu=Uniformed Services&ps=24&p=0

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romans11servant

I did some research this morning and I tend to agree with the general consensus about these two ribbons. I discovered that they were proposed but not officially authorized for wear by the Department of Defense. What I also believe is that these two proposed ribbons were actually realized through other means i.e. actual authorized Army Badges like the Combat Action Badge, Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Combat Medical Badge. I love your use of the term "Fantasy pieces". Very true just like the Army Wound Ribbon of 1917 that was never issued amd the Official "Unofficial" Cold War Medal and Ribbon Bar. They all exist but they has never been any authorization for wear. I was also reading a tidbit about the "Combat Recognition Ribbon" which was meant to be a ribbon-only award but was later replaced by the "Combat Action Badge" because the ribbon-only award did not carry the prestige of a decoration or medal, henceforth the Army version of the ribbons made official Badges which bear the same significance and garner greater prestige than it's Navy and Marine Corps' Combat Action ribbon, the Coast Guards' Combat Action Ribbon, and finally the Air Forces' Combat Action Medal Ribbon counterparts. 

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romans11servant

I love it when people of like-mind come together to collaborate about subject like Militaria. You never know what to expect or what you might learn! Thank you everyone!

 

Fair winds and following seas! 

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romans11servant

BTW, I have provided a link to a pdf file of almost all the official ribbons including the two ribbons that I've inquired about:

 

http://www.omsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Illustrated-Guide-United-States-Military-Specification-MIL-DTL-11589-Ribbons-11-March-2018.pdf

 

The correct nomenclature and MIL_Specs are:

 

Combat and Expert Infantry Ribbon  MIL-DTL-11589/33

U.S. Army Combat Action Ribbon MIL-DTL-11589/618

 

For anyone interested interested in a deeper investigation. The ribbon bars do have a matching streamers associated with each one. 

 

 

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romans11servant

Here is the name of the book previously mentioned in this thread:

 

The Call of Duty, Expanded Edition

by John E. Strandberg (Author), Roger Bender (Author), Bender Publishing (Editor)

 

This monumental work spans over two centuries and illustrates in striking color the evolution of U.S. Military decorations from 1782 to the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal in 2003. In this comprehensive reference, not only are the obverse, reverse, and appropriate rim markings illustrated in full color, it also states eligibility for the award and gives historical background. An added treat are dozens of period photos of the decorations being worn. This new expanded edition is a result of continued years of research and upgrading of photographs, and has 176 more pages than the first edition. The authors have also been able to expand the coverage of known rim number styles and number ranges for Army, Navy, and Marine Corps campaign medals. With modern digital technology, all medals and ribbons have been color-corrected to give you the most accurate and detailed images. Although the first edition was highly praised, this new edition is without a doubt the best book ever done on the subject! Although there are an additional 176 pages of color, the publisher is holding to the price of the first edition printed a decade ago.

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ItemCo16527
1 hour ago, romans11servant said:

I love it when people of like-mind come together to collaborate about subject like Militaria. You never know what to expect or what you might learn! Thank you everyone!

 

Fair winds and following seas! 

Amen to that! I've been in this hobby for over 30 years, and the community is one of the best parts. Between forums like this, and meeting people at militaria shows, I've always had great experiences with fellow collectors. I've learned a lot from the people I've met along the way, and wouldn't trade this hobby for any other hobby. 

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