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Remove Rust Hardware


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Hello everyone,

 

Today I received a very nice M1928 Haversack. It is in mint condition.

The only problem is that two hardware pieces have a little bit of rust on it.

Can someone tell me how to remove rust and preserve the hardware? Maybe some WD-40?

 

 

 

Thanks in advance,

Rutger.

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At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them.

 

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Maybe lightly sand the rusted areas and coat it with a little gun oil? Your other option is to buy some new hardware.

Try www.atthefront.com and go to the fabric and hardware section.

 

Thank you for the tip. What kind of sandpaper would you use (grit size)?

 

Any other opinions?

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them.

 

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Here's a link to a previous post on the forum.

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...showtopic=34952

 

This is a much better solution than sanding (less agressive to the material). You can buy those copper/brass brushes at any hardware store (Gamma, Karwei etc.).

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

Money can't buy happiness -- but somehow it's more comfortable to cry in a Corvette than in a Yugo.

 

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This is a much better solution than sanding (less agressive to the material). You can buy those copper/brass brushes at any hardware store (Gamma, Karwei etc.).

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

 

I already ordered a few brass (messing) brushes on the internet for a nice price. I'm curious about the result.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them.

 

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You might try Oxalic acid at a 20% solution with a .00 steel wool with a light buffing. It is very good for rust removal.

Steve

This DAY of FREEDOM brought to you by current Military Personnel and Veterans.

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You might try Oxalic acid at a 20% solution with a .00 steel wool with a light buffing. It is very good for rust removal.

Steve

 

There are several products on the market, mostly for auto restoration, that will stop the rust oxidation and turn the iron oxide to some other inert compound. I have a bottle of Furtan that I got from a friend, 40 years ago, who was into cars and restorations. It is bio-degradable, non-toxic and it turns the rust to a black powder. It mixes well with water to get into all the corners and cracks. The end product can be blued or polished or painted.

 

Before you go to using sand paper or emery cloth, I would suggest using the internet to search for rust inhibitors or the like. If the rust is so bad that there is pitting, it would probably take too much sanding or filing to get the pits out. You would be better served by using something like this stuff I have and then re-bluing the pieces. You keep the originality and do not destroy any adjacent historic finish.

 

Just my thoughts.

 

Robert

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DO NOT SAND... Use nothing that will remove metal. Find Renaissance Metal De-Corroder and use that. It will remove just the rust. You won't have to use a brush of any type unless the rust is flacky. To preserve the metal after cleaning the rust off use Renaissance Wax if you don't repaint. It will keep the metal from rusting.

 

Again, I'm a purist when it comes to cleaning and using anything that is abrasive is to me destructive and with todays cleaning and preserving products I see no reason to be destructive if you don't have to.

 

I've put this in other post but here are the three primary products I use.

 

Vulpex, potassium methyl cyclohexyl oleate soap, for cleaning

Renaissance Metal De-Corroder to remove corrosion from most metals

Renaissance Wax to protect woods and metals

 

All these products are currently used in many museums for cleaning and preservation of artifacts.

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