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M1 CARBINE "RARE" SIGHT


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Hello fellows

Woul you support me to identify this M1 model with this mid adjustable sight that I have never seen pls. All it parts match as Rock Ola except the receiver that is Inland w/serial number. Thank you in advance.

Regalos

Eddie

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20210203_174558.jpg

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US Victory Museum

Sure.   This is what is known as a hill-billy butcher sporterized conversion of a beautiful I-cut stocked M1 carbine.

 

If the extra sight wasn't enough of a clue, then the cross-hatch engraved stock should have caught your eye.

The military never issued such an abomination.  It's too bad, but once upon a time these rifles were so plentiful

and so cheap that most people wouldn't have given a second thought to hacking up a perfectly good rifle.

 

Cheers!

Msn

 

 

 

 

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OLDNAVYNUKESPOOK

Sad but true.  That stock, in its original configuration without the checkering would be worth a few hundred dollars but now is worth less than a hundred.

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That stock is I-cut and high-wood. Worth a lot if not butchered up. Horrible!

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With the shortened barrel is this rifle not illegal without paperwork from the BATF?  Short barreled rifle permit?

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Bubba ruined a wonderful, hard to find stock and  carbine with nice early features such as the rear flip sight and early barrel band with no bayonet lug. It  does look like the barrel is way too short to be legal.

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Brian Keith

Hello Eddie,

Welcome to the forum. I'm sorry that your first post elicited such strong negative comments. Sometimes we’re like a bunch of guys hanging out in the “Mancave” having a few brews and just bluntly saying what we think.

As has been stated, this has been altered quite a bit since it left military service. The two biggest issues are the stock and the barrel. Also as mentioned, in the US, it may possibly be a “less than legal” barrel length. For military firearms collectors, it is painful to look at. Maybe the best thing to do is break it down to salvage the good parts. You can either search for a proper barrel and stock, or sell the parts and look for an unaltered example. I have never seen a sight like that put on an M-1 carbine! Really just doesn’t make any since as it still has the original sights and they are just fine for the .30 caliber carbine round it fires. Never underestimate what “Bubba” can and will do! It may have been done in a country other than the US, which is more familiar with this type of sight.

It has become quite a project for some to search and bring back to US configuration, firearms that fell to the hands of what we refer to as “Bubba”, the shade tree gunsmith.

Thanks for posting it, do let us know what you end up doing with this, could be a fine project!

Best Regards!

BKW

 

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Eddie.  How did you acquire this gun?  I bet there’s a story there that might be fascinating to hear.

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viking4zero

I think your best bet here is to salvage the parts and pieces that are original (unmolested) USGI parts and resell them. It looks like the flip sight is there, depending on maker it alone might fetch between 1-2 hundred.

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On 2/10/2021 at 7:13 PM, Brian Keith said:

Hello Eddie,

Welcome to the forum. I'm sorry that your first post elicited such strong negative comments. Sometimes we’re like a bunch of guys hanging out in the “Mancave” having a few brews and just bluntly saying what we think.

As has been stated, this has been altered quite a bit since it left military service. The two biggest issues are the stock and the barrel. Also as mentioned, in the US, it may possibly be a “less than legal” barrel length. For military firearms collectors, it is painful to look at. Maybe the best thing to do is break it down to salvage the good parts. You can either search for a proper barrel and stock, or sell the parts and look for an unaltered example. I have never seen a sight like that put on an M-1 carbine! Really just doesn’t make any since as it still has the original sights and they are just fine for the .30 caliber carbine round it fires. Never underestimate what “Bubba” can and will do! It may have been done in a country other than the US, which is more familiar with this type of sight.

It has become quite a project for some to search and bring back to US configuration, firearms that fell to the hands of what we refer to as “Bubba”, the shade tree gunsmith.

Thanks for posting it, do let us know what you end up doing with this, could be a fine project!

Best Regards!

BKW

 

Howdy Brian

 

I really appreciate your post. Dont worry I really dont take in bad way the others strong comments because I hadnt did those changes. I will keep it because I inherited from granpa, I will try to find a Rock Ola barrel and spear parts to keep it as much as original possible.

 

I really love guns specially the old ones and if they have a piece of history even better.

 

Regards

Eddie

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On 2/11/2021 at 8:09 AM, BryanJ said:

Eddie.  How did you acquire this gun?  I bet there’s a story there that might be fascinating to hear.

Howdy Bryan.

 

I inherited from grandpa, he was the sheriff in his old town.

 

Do you have M1s?

 

Regards

Eddie

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On 2/14/2021 at 10:11 PM, viking4zero said:

I think your best bet here is to salvage the parts and pieces that are original (unmolested) USGI parts and resell them. It looks like the flip sight is there, depending on maker it alone might fetch between 1-2 hundred.

Howdy Viking

 

Thanks I will try to get the Rock Ola parts to bring it as original as possible.

 

Do you have M1s?

 

Regards

Eddie

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On 2/15/2021 at 5:10 PM, Scottz63 said:

How is that added on leaf sight attached? Welded, screwed, epoxied?

Howdy Scott.

 

Not sure about it, I will take it to the gunsmith to find out.

 

Do you have M1s?

 

Regards 

Eddie

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Eddie.  If I inherited that rifle from my Grand Dad, I would not change a thing.  He modified the rifle because it was important to him to do so, for whatever reason, and I’d appreciate the rifle because of that.  Keep that rifle, enjoy it, and pass it on to your kids one day.

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8 minutes ago, BryanJ said:

Eddie.  If I inherited that rifle from my Grand Dad, I would not change a thing.  He modified the rifle because it was important to him to do so, for whatever reason, and I’d appreciate the rifle because of that.  Keep that rifle, enjoy it, and pass it on to your kids one day.

Since he was a sheriff, he might have picked it up on the job somewhere along the way.

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48 minutes ago, EddieM said:

Howdy Scott.

 

Not sure about it, I will take it to the gunsmith to find out.

 

Do you have M1s?

 

Regards 

Eddie

I do. An IBM.

M1Carstock1.jpg

M1Carstock2.jpg

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Brian Keith
2 hours ago, EddieM said:

Howdy Brian

 

I really appreciate your post. Dont worry I really dont take in bad way the others strong comments because I hadnt did those changes. I will keep it because I inherited from granpa, I will try to find a Rock Ola barrel and spear parts to keep it as much as original possible.

 

I really love guns specially the old ones and if they have a piece of history even better.

 

Regards

Eddie

Hello Eddie,

With it having come from your grandfather, that does change things a bit. Other than confirming that the barrel length is legal where you live, I would probably leave it like Grandpa had it. There really are a lot of US M1 carbines out there, but probably only this one was your Grandfathers. That is assuming on my part that it is something he possibly carried and used, as opposed to something he may have taken away from some miscreant years ago and it really didn't mean anything to your grandfather. This gun does have a history!

Have a great day!
BKW

Reminds me of a story I heard about a long ago local sheriff. The rumor was that if he was called out to a domestic dispute, usually, the conflict was settled down, and nobody went to jail. But, he felt the need to make sure no firearms were on the property in case the conflict resumed. Strangely, the guns never got inventoried or placed in an evidence room. But if you went to a gunshop just across the state line to Ohio, you could buy your guns back.  

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ludwigh1980

I like the look of it, what we call a brush gun. What’s been done is done. I’d leave it as it is. Bet is has taken down many deer. Funny, I have seen examples like this with its patina and character bring more than a correct M1 at local ranch estate auctions. 

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On 2/21/2021 at 6:09 AM, BryanJ said:

Eddie.  If I inherited that rifle from my Grand Dad, I would not change a thing.  He modified the rifle because it was important to him to do so, for whatever reason, and I’d appreciate the rifle because of that.  Keep that rifle, enjoy it, and pass it on to your kids one day.

 

Hi Bryan,

Thats my idea pass it on to my kids one day  ☺️

Regards

Eddie

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On 2/21/2021 at 6:19 AM, Scottz63 said:

Since he was a sheriff, he might have picked it up on the job somewhere along the way.

 

Yeah Scott,

For sure it was like that.

Regards

Eddie

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On 2/21/2021 at 6:22 AM, Scottz63 said:

I do. An IBM.

M1Carstock1.jpg

M1Carstock2.jpg

Nice IBM Scott

Wich year is from?

Is all made with IBMs parts?

Regards

Eddie  =) 

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