Jump to content

Interesting MK2 grenade body found


Recommended Posts

Over the weekend I got lucky and found a MK2 grenade body for essentially the price of a bad reproduction, it is missing a lot of it's paint but overall I think it is a nice find and am happy with it. I do have a few questions about it that I was hoping the forum could answer. First, I am curious if anyone knew what type of fuse was correct for the grenade. I know both the M10A3 and M6 fuses were used based upon what type of explosives were used in the grenade, but how do I tell which type of explosive was used in this grenade and which fuse I need?  I have been looking but havn't found anywhere on the forum or a couple of other good sites I know of that say how to tell the difference. 

 

My second question is that my grenade has the remnants of yellow paint around the neck of the grenade, yet the faint remains of blue paint elsewhere on the body (I took pictures and I hope the faint paint is visible in them, I am sorry if they are not). I know that some MK2 grenades were converted to training grenades but I thought those had a hole drilled in the bottom. This example still has a solid metal base so I am wondering if it really would have been used as a training grenade? Or could it have been painted before a conversion, which never happened, occurred? If anyone has an explanation of why a solid body HE grenade would end up painted blue like a practice grenade I would greatly appreciate it.

 

Thanks in advance and I hope you enjoy seeing it.

thumbnail_IMG_5503.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_5504.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_5506.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_5507.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kaptainssurplus

That is an american fireworks body, they used a M10A1 or A2, the only reason that that is known is because of other AF examples that were found live and documented. Otherwise it would be impossible to know what HE filler was used. There are certain body markings that are known to be TNT filled and others EC blank filled but most are unknown. As far as I know, no one can figure it out completely, it has been a major topic of the MK2 for years with no definite answers. Even trying to figure out a MK2 from a MK2A1 as eluded experts as information is just not available. Heck even to this day there are unknown manufacturers body markings. As for the color, I suspect it was originally OD with yellow stripe on top (as most AF bodies are, there are a few rare examples of all yellow), the body is very worn (I have seen many AF examples and they are usually very crisp bodies). It could have been repainted at some time blue or the blue color is the product of a chemical process. It was never a live practice version as it would have had an offset threaded hole in the bottom plugged with a peice of cork to release the pressure from the fuze going off, uless it was just a throwing dummy, which would be weird using a HE body and not the common solid cast throwing dummy instead

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, Kaptainssurplus said:

That is an american fireworks body, 

Thanks so much for the great information! I had tried finding more information on the american fireworks grenades but did not find much on them specifically so I am glad you could help. I am glad I got lucky finding one that the information was known about.  Also thank you for confirming that it could not be a live trainer, that or the possibility that it was a throwing dummy did not really make much sense to me either because the few that I have or have seen have the hole to vent pressure but that is always the first thing to come to my mind when I see a blue grenade. I think I will go with the color being the product of some chemical reaction because other explanations do not seem to explain why there would be a blue HE, I might try removing a little of the paint to see if I can see is still green under it. 

 

You seem so much more experienced with grenades then me, if you do not mind me asking do you think this example is worth the cost to restore with a fuse? I did not realize this example was considered that worn because I rarely find grenades and I am not really familiar with prices but I think I can get a M10A1 to complete it for $50. Would that be worth it?

 

Thanks again!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kaptainssurplus

Personally I wouldn't restore it, I'd leave it as is and just add the fuze if you cam find one for a good deal. If you restored the body, it would be evident it was restored and wouldn't get anymore money, most collectorsike original stuff. It seems now a days the fuzes are selling for crazy prices, they were once around $30ish not long ago, now I see them selling from $50-75 and a some more than that. If your not into the body for a lot of money add the fuze and call it a day. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I guess I meant completing it not restoring it because my intent was only to add the missing fuse, painting you are right it would be difficult to do and obvious that it was done. Plus, I already have a MK2 that I suspect has been messed with so I would rather have an ugly original one. I found the body for $20 so I am not to deep into the project, I am just not too familiar with the market prices because I almost never come across this stuff and know prices are rising.  I did find some fuses online for $50 so I think I will try and get one if they are not too corroded. If I do I will add a picture of the completed grenade. Thank you for the advice you were a huge help.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kaptainssurplus

Looks like you got a good deal, completed with fuze in that condition it probably be worth $150-225 but prices have gone crazy as of late, so maybe more. But to collectors who have been around probably wouldn't pay more than $175-200 for it in that shape. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2021 at 3:02 PM, Kaptainssurplus said:

That is an american fireworks body, they used a M10A1 or A2, the only reason that that is known is because of other AF examples that were found live and documented. Otherwise it would be impossible to know what HE filler was used. There are certain body markings that are known to be TNT filled and others EC blank filled but most are unknown. As far as I know, no one can figure it out completely, it has been a major topic of the MK2 for years with no definite answers. Even trying to figure out a MK2 from a MK2A1 as eluded experts as information is just not available. Heck even to this day there are unknown manufacturers body markings. As for the color, I suspect it was originally OD with yellow stripe on top (as most AF bodies are, there are a few rare examples of all yellow), the body is very worn (I have seen many AF examples and they are usually very crisp bodies). It could have been repainted at some time blue or the blue color is the product of a chemical process. It was never a live practice version as it would have had an offset threaded hole in the bottom plugged with a peice of cork to release the pressure from the fuze going off, uless it was just a throwing dummy, which would be weird using a HE body and not the common solid cast throwing dummy instead

Timeline and fuze type is the key. Fact is TNT filled grenades hit the field in late 1944, and discontinued in 1945 for the new style fuze, which is why grenades with the M6 fuze ( the M6 fuze was a detonator) is somewhat a rarity. Keep in mind the majority of grenades found today used flash powder with an M10A3 ( M10 series) fuze, a simple igniter, it could be deactivated by unscrewing the fuze assembly and pouring the powder out. A TNT grenade not so easy. TNT when manufactured, was heated to 180 degrees and poured into the body, cooled and solidified-deactivating was done by boiling the TNT out, or “ cooking” it in an oven same as artillery shells.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the estimate, I had thought complete it might only be worth $75-100 which was why I was worried and asked if it was worth completing. Looks like I saved myself quite a bit finding this for my collection. I have always been interested in ordinance but have always had a hard time finding it so this is a welcome addition. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 917601 said:

Timeline and fuze type is the key. Fact is TNT filled grenades hit the field in late 1944, and discontinued in 1945 for the new style fuze, which is why grenades with the M6 fuze ( the M6 fuze was a detonator) is somewhat a rarity. Keep in mind the majority of grenades found today used flash powder with an M10A3 ( M10 series) fuze, a simple igniter, it could be deactivated by unscrewing the fuze assembly and pouring the powder out. A TNT grenade not so easy. TNT when manufactured, was heated to 180 degrees and poured into the body, cooled and solidified-deactivating was done by boiling the TNT out, or “ cooking” it in an oven same as artillery shells.

Thank you 917601, it sounds like you are agreeing M10 would most likely be the correct fuze to use. I appreciate explaining the powder vs. TNT difference, I have been reading a lot of your past posts on the subject of MK2 grenades and it has been entertaining and informative. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will add to what Kaptain said, I follow auctions, GB, and others regularly to monitor prices. Prices are getting very high for quality pieces, eg, good paint, fuze with original container. Something about the Pineapples, a lot of entry level collectors - not necessarily ordnance types- would love to have one, and then another and another....screw plug, yellow, solid bottom, M10, M6 fuses.....I do not see demand going down. Collections are built, then as an auctioneer told me, held for 20-30 years then the collection hits the market, then all bought up and the cycle continues. Buy what you like, IMO, you can’t get hurt with any WW2 MK2, even if repainted or coloring in poor shape. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.