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"Eagle" Wing on Ebay


LtDan

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Hello,

Any opinions on this "wing" on Ebay?   More photos are at the following link:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Original-WWI-US-Air-Service-Pilot-800-Silver-Eagle-Wings-Dog-Tag-ID-Bracelet/193678719682?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

 

An ID bracelet and a possible French eagle wing.   I know the French "FIX" eagle pins were civilian jewelry worn very early in the War.  Could this be something similar?

 

Thanks,

Dan

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Ran this by Ron Burkey who said it was not a US, French, or German military badge and may be a jewelry piece. I asked about it specifically related to US aero squadrons, which it is not related to. 

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https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/79596-nco-pilotsobservers-in-the-rfcraf/

 

Some side information about NCO pilots in WW1.

 

 

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8 hours ago, The Rooster said:

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/79596-nco-pilotsobservers-in-the-rfcraf/

 

Some side information about NCO pilots in WW1.

Thank you.....good information about NCO pilots/observers.   I don't know what job the person on this ID bracelet had......maybe this jewelry piece was picked up as a "sweetheart" item.

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3 hours ago, LtDan said:

Thank you.....good information about NCO pilots/observers.   I don't know what job the person on this ID bracelet had......maybe this jewelry piece was picked up as a "sweetheart" item.

Oh dont get me started.... lol I could imagine all kind of scenario's for the Sergeant First Class !!! 😀

You would have to did into the guys records to get an idea of what he was doing.

Maybe a pilot or aircrew? Maybe a mechanic or maybe a platoon Sergeant etc etc . The records would lead you in the right direction

and his number unit rank and all is right there.

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The 1106th AS was a late arrival to France, getting there in June of 1918 and was demobilized a bit over a year later in September, 1919

 

I haven't done much research yet, but as this group was formed as an Air Service Replacement Squadron, located at the Air Service Production Center No. 2. at Romorantin Aerodrome.  It appears (from Wikipedia) that Initially, the main purpose of the Center was the assembly and final testing of airplanes and engines manufactured in the United States. However the Center also developed into a major supply depot for the Dayton-Wright built DH-4 along with the Liberty Engines. It also was a storage and repair depot for all balloons used by the Air Service. 

If I had to guess, I would seriously doubt that Sgt 1st Class Williams was an NCO pilot in the 1106th AS.  Since the 1106th was a repair/replacement group, I would lean towards something more along the lines of mechanic or administrative role.  But who knows?

The pin is wonderful and could have been some sort of keepsake/souvenir from his time in France.  The bracelet is also great.

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2 minutes ago, David B said:

Is that a cavity in the back of the eagle?

 

Answering my own question but yes it does appear to be a cavity, for a photo perhaps??20201019_194047.jpg.3d757cb53de375b291b9ad4be171dd2c.jpg

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I tried to look up the French hallmarks and assay marks, but wasn't having much luck. That will probably give you an idea of when and where it was made.  Kind of like the UK marks found on silver.

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Airborne-Hunter

My initial impression was the hallmarks were German. I have nothing to base that on, but that was my impression. I have never seen anything turn of the century with a hollow back cavity such as that. I think this requires spin/spun/centrifugal casting and I generally have only seen it on later pieces for jewelry. However, the process was in existence at the time, but to what extent I am not sure. More so the fittings are very interesting. They do not fit the typical French style I have seen for aero squadrons. In fact, the catch appears to be the "Tiffany" style, of the era, but not what I would associate with French manufacture. The T-Bar hinge is of the era, but is not the same as documented original aero squadron pins. Again comparing it to other French wings, neither the catch nor the hinge match anything I have seen. 

I have never seen anything made like this. I can not speak to authenticity. However, I don't think it is French in origin. In fact, to me, the manufacturing makes me think American, the design appears French and the hallmarks German. 

California

 

"Only 2 defining forces have ever offered to die for you....Jesus Christ and the American Soldier.

One died for your soul, the other for your freedom."

 

-Lt. Col. Grant L. Rosensteel, Jr.

USAF

 

''A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have.'' Gerald Ford

 

"Those who melt their guns into plows will plow for those who don't." Thomas Jefferson

 

"I live in weirdville." Owen

 

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I have read that Pilots back then would, if it was feasible, land near an enemy plane they shot down and remove a piece of the planes fabric for proof. If the SFC was not a pilot, It could be a pilot that he knew took it off a German pilot he shot down and gave it to the SFC...........

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