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Small collection in Sweden, so far so good.


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Bayonets are not my main interests in collecting but when I see one here in Sweden at the right price, I get it.

 

1. Remington 1913

2. M1905 SA, 1914. Scabbard is USN MK1

3. M1905 (or are they called M1942?) WT, 1942. Probebly the best bayo in my collection, mint condition. scabbard is USN MK1.

4. M1905E1  RIA 1918 with Bowie tip, scabbard is a cut down USN MK1.

5. M1905E1  RIA 1918 with spear tip, scabbard is a cut down M3 with steel tip. Was that steel tip on the scabbard done during the war or in US? I bought this from Greece.

6. M1 UFH, 1943, scabbard is a cut down M3.

7. M4 Utica with M8A1 BM Co scabbard.

8. M7 BOC with M8A1 PHW scabbard.

DSC_0001.JPG

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Kai Robert- Looks like you have a great start on your collection. The Wilde Tool M1905 is really a prize these days. Thanks for showing.  SKIP

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Kai- Let me see if I can explain this off the top of my head. The bayonet was made by Remington for the British P14 rifle. The U.S. bought a ton of these from England for the U.S. M1917 rifles, which were basically P14s converted to .30-06 caliber.  The 1913 is the model number, and the 9-17 is when it was made. Then bought by the U.S. and restamped. I have a Remington that has the British markings over stamped, and the U.S. added. Think I got story right. SKIP

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1 hour ago, SKIPH said:

Kai- Let me see if I can explain this off the top of my heart. The bayonet was made by Remington for the British P14 rifle. The U.S. bought a ton of these from England for the U.S. M1917 rifles, which were basically P14s converted to .30-06 caliber.  The 1913 is the model number, and the 9-17 is when it was made. Then bought by the U.S. and restamped. I have a Remington that has the British markings over stamped, and the U.S. added. Think I got story right. SKIP

Thanks Skip, I get it

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Hello Kai,

When Remington and Winchester were making these bayonets for England, they were called the P1913 bayonet. Originally, they were used on the short lived P1913 rifle and then used with the P1914 rifle.  Once the U.S. entered WWI, and converted the P1913 bayonets, the name was changed to the M1917 bayonet.  Your bayonet is called an M1917 bayonet.  It happens to be a rather rare one because the reverse side retains the P1913 markings, but on the obverse side, the full U. S. markings are present, except for the small "X" bend test mark.  Usually, the Broad Arrow, Crown and A. would be crossed out and have a U.S. mark placed on the ricasso.

A very nice M1917 bayonet.  Thanks for showing us your collection.

Marv

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On 10/3/2020 at 5:01 AM, Misfit 45 said:

Hello Kai,

When Remington and Winchester were making these bayonets for England, they were called the P1913 bayonet. Originally, they were used on the short lived P1913 rifle and then used with the P1914 rifle.  Once the U.S. entered WWI, and converted the P1913 bayonets, the name was changed to the M1917 bayonet.  Your bayonet is called an M1917 bayonet.  It happens to be a rather rare one because the reverse side retains the P1913 markings, but on the obverse side, the full U. S. markings are present, except for the small "X" bend test mark.  Usually, the Broad Arrow, Crown and A. would be crossed out and have a U.S. mark placed on the ricasso.

A very nice M1917 bayonet.  Thanks for showing us your collection.

Marv

Thanks Marv 

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