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Inert ordnance from the Chickasha Militaria show the weekend


Pat Daniels

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I just returned home from the Chickasha Oklahoma Militaria Show. Despite the pandemic, over 300 tables were filled with militaria collectables of all types and the attendance was good. I had one of my best and most diverse hauls of inert ordnance from any show. Some of the highlights are a 1,000 lb U.S. bomb, a Cooper WW1 bomb, a lovely #36 Mk1 Mills marked R.B.D., an interesting cutaway of an S-mine, and a scattering of other inert items.
Any help with identification of the 57mm silver painted projectile would be helpful. It measures 19.5cm tall from the base to the top of the fuze well. The only marking I can see is a large letter R on the base.

All comments and information are welcome! THANKS! Pat

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3 hours ago, sundance said:

What is the clear plastic / glass item?

 

Curious about that one also.  Not an ordnance guy so forgive the basic, wild guess, but is that an example of the "glass ones that the mine detectors don't pick up" mentioned by Capt Miller in one of the early scenes of "Saving Private Ryan"?

 

Also, I got to the Chickasha show about 15 minutes after it opened on Friday and saw the "SOLD" sign on the 1,000 pounder.  I thought to myself "Jeez, how early do you have to get to these shows if you're collecting 1,000 pound bombs!?  Those munitions guys are motivated!"

 

Nice haul!

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German "Glasmine 43".  WW2 German antipersonnel mine....  Captain Miller was right, these and others like the wooden Schützenmine 42 (Schu-mine), were a real pain to clear out of a field.

Looking for items related to the Ninth Coast Artillery District and 6th Coast Artillery Regment

 

Airman, give me a 341 !!!!

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T Ambrosini is correct.  Using glass served several functions.  It was more difficult to detect having a minimal metallic signature, glass was not an essential material during the late war years, and it was water proof.  The glass mine bowls are still quite common in Europe (used as flower pots etc.) but complete examples are a bit more difficult to find.

 

I bought the 1,000lb bomb within minutes of it being unloaded.  Another buyer was standing behind me waiting in case I wavered.  Just a note:  A 1,000lb bomb will fit in the back seat of a Ford Flex sideways (minus the fins).

 

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  • Charlie Flick changed the title to Inert ordnance from the Chickasha Militaria show the weekend

Pat is like a vacuum cleaner when it comes to hard to find ordnance at shows. It is always interesting to see what rare items he turns up. Thanks for showing!!

Please visit my website at http://www.bbmilitaria.com for a wide selection of quality military antiques!
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A vacuum cleaner huh.....Well, now that you mention it, I have been told that I suck.  Some of my better items have come from bbmilitaria!  Thanks!

 

One item turned out to be a home run.  The nasty silver painted projectile turned out to be a piece of ordnance unobtanium.  I RARELY remove paint or restore items as the current condition sometimes has actual significance, no matter how strange it may appear. But, this poor projectile had been assaulted twice, first with a coat of gold paint and then a super thick coat of silver. A painstaking removal revealed no underlying paint and a flawless original pre WW1 boat gun projectile.

 

 

03 - 6cm Imperial German SF.jpg

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"Unobtanium"....  HAHAHAH!  Never heard that one.  Reminds me of terms like "incarceritis"...  Or the sudden onset of chest pain (or other symptom) that you develop about the time the handcuffs are being put on.  Nice find, BTW!

Looking for items related to the Ninth Coast Artillery District and 6th Coast Artillery Regment

 

Airman, give me a 341 !!!!

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19 minutes ago, T Ambrosini said:

"Unobtanium"....  HAHAHAH!  Never heard that one.  Reminds me of terms like "incarceritis"...  Or the sudden onset of chest pain (or other symptom) that you develop about the time the handcuffs are being put on.  Nice find, BTW!

 Where I work we use the term "unobtanium" for metal pieces that we are talking about when those that are also around think they know what they are talking about.  When a hydraulic or pneumatic system is not working properly and there are those around that think they "know' what the problem is we usually say, "no, the conifulator valve seems to be not working properly".

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Thanks for the nice comments.  WW 1 grenades and air dropped ordnance are my favorite items but almost any inert ordnance is welcome!

 

Pat

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