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Silver painted liner


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I have a late ww2 liner painted white. Under the white is silver paint. Nothing under the silver paint at all. Why would a liner be painted silver from the get go? 

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I have a late ww2 liner painted white. Under the white is silver paint. Nothing under the silver paint at all. Why would a liner be painted silver from the get go? 

Do you have some pictures?

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My account is in honor of my late great, Grandfather SSGT Joseph M Gill WW2 - Korea Veteran. We miss you every day.

Always Interested in 77th Division Items WW1-WW2!

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Burning Hazard

Silver painted liners were used all over. I've read about them being used at parades, ranges, and for training. I also seen a handful of helmets + liners painted silver and gold that came out of a student theater; they were used as stage props.

 

Pat

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I have two silver liners - both USAAF training. One with gunnery school decal and the other just numbered with wing and prop stencils.

 

Dave

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BILL THE PATCH

Is it this one, I've had this for awhilee0a67acf28ca824ea826e50bee0d70a0.jpg

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No. Mine has the horny toad decal like the one in Life magazine back during the war. I’ll get pics at some point. 

That looks a little like a 70s rock album!

Dave

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Awesome decals on the gunnery school liners.

 

I wish every cloud had a silver liner like those.

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Cap Camouflage Pattern I

Very cool liners, as to why gap's liner has no factory OD under the silver paint, two possibilities spring to mind. I have seen a good number of liners with no paint at all in photos of US soldiers in the 1950s and ARVN in the 1960s, presumably some batches of liners had substandard paint adhesion. The other possibility is if the liner was used for a ceremonial purpose, if the liner had already seen some use and suffered damage to the original paint then removing it before painting it silver would give it a cleaner appearance.

A picture is worth a thousand words, so here's a thousand pictures!

"I read that in war bad things happen, Ain't that the ************* truth" -1st Lt Mike Scotti

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Most WWII-era silver painted liners I've encountered were from AAF gunnery schools. I read somewhere (but can't remember where) that these silver liner were painted when gunners graduated from basic training and were able to move up to turret training.

 

The liner below was issued with the factory OD, then painted bright yellow, and later painted silver.

 

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That's a cool one. The flexible gunnery course was only about 3 weeks IIRC so I'm not sure if it that accelerated timeline would allow for or involve that kind of helmet liner modification. If it did, and they belonged to each student, they would not likely enter the theater painted like that. If so, wouldn't there would be many more of them in circulation considering the hundreds of thousands of graduates? I always assumed they stayed at the various training bases and were just checked out by the students.

Interesting discussion.

Ideas?

Dave

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