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Late 1950s-Early 1960s Cloth Glider Qualifcation Badge on a Fatique Shirt in South Vietnam


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Came across this photo, an Unidentified Infantry Officer of MAAG Vietnam in 1962-63 wearing as we see a cloth Glider Qualification Badge on his Fatigue Shirt, wish we could see his NAME Tape a lot better to grab a last name. Cloth Badge appears to be U.S. Made of OD Cotton Sateen, if not them on OD HBT. This first time I've seen this badge worn in this way, would figure why not right, loads of former WWII Glider troopers could still be found serving in the late 50s early 60s in both the Active and Reserve components right.

opim.jpg

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KIller picture!!  

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I "primarily" collect Gulf War 1 patches. All branches (USA, USAF,USN, USMC & USCG) and ALL Countries..
US - Op.'s Desert Shield / Storm / Provide Comfort /Some Southern Watch - F-4G's Wild Weasels
UK - Op.'s Granby / Sabre / Warden
Canadian - Op. Desert Storm / Op. Friction
French - Daguet / Aconit
Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, South Korea, etc.
Looking for the oddities, including unfinished & flaws
I HAVE EXTRA's!! Will trade as well.

 

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On 7/17/2020 at 7:21 PM, patches said:

Came across this photo, an Unidentified Infantry Officer of MAAG Vietnam in 1962-63 wearing as we see a cloth Glider Qualification Badge on his Fatigue Shirt, wish we could see his NAME Tape a lot better to grab a last name. Cloth Badge appears to be U.S. Made of OD Cotton Sateen, if not them on OD HBT. This first time I've seen this badge worn in this way, would figure why not right, loads of former WWII Glider troopers could still be found serving in the late 50s early 60s in both the Active and Reserve components right.

opim.jpg

 

 

Right ! Even in my Guard unit in Illinois in 1982, our First Sergeant was a vet of WW2 Korea and Vietnam.

We all pitched in and gave him a nice engraved rifle when he retired in like 1984.

First Sergeant Pace.

 

 

 

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He looks to be field grade and his last name may end in “key.” 
 

I’m looking for MAAG Vietnam rosters but can’t find any. 

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Member:

ASMIC

OVMS

Primary interests:

The United States Army in WWII

The United States Army in Vietnam
 

My YouTube patch channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxXvNiUvwbB-e4i0gl-RrFA

 

WANTED:

WWII:

551st PIB pocket and shoulder patches

504th PIR real deal pocket patch 

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4 hours ago, rooster77 said:

 

 

Right ! Even in my Guard unit in Illinois in 1982, our First Sergeant was a vet of WW2 Korea and Vietnam.

We all pitched in and gave him a nice engraved rifle when he retired in like 1984.

First Sergeant Pace.

 

 

 

Was he 11B in all Three?

 

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4 hours ago, Longhorn92 said:

He looks to be field grade and his last name may end in “key.” 
 

I’m looking for MAAG Vietnam rosters but can’t find any. 

Yeah it. a toughty, Markey, Larkey, Malarkey, Oakey, McCoskey and on and on.

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3 hours ago, patches said:

Was he 11B in all Three?

 

I never asked him. But he was 11B. He knew his stuff. He corrected me back in 83 when I F trooped upon something rather important which I did not take seriously.

I was an E2. he also taught us all how to kill clean and cook chickens in the field. Something I had never learned having not gown up on a farm.He also noticed I was having a problem out in the field and asked me what was wrong... I'd been eating C rations or Maybe it was meals rejected by everyone... Any way he got the drift and gave me a huge can of applesauce which solved my problem. He was a wise old soldier. We were lucky to have him. We also had several Vietnam combat Vets. They were our cooks. Not only did they do a great job, they knew all about the .50 cal and they were experts with it. Just having a couple guys like that in your unit at that time was like gold.

They knew what the deal was and back then we didnt know. It was not popular to be in the guard back then.

There were'nt many left in the 1980's. And the first sergeant was the only one who had been in all 3 wars up to that time.. Our Co was a grunt in Vietnam too. Now there are a bunch of vets with combat experience in the military and the guard and reserves. Back then not so many.

Those guys were priceless for their experience and knowledge and wisdom..

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8 hours ago, rooster77 said:

I never asked him. But he was 11B. He knew his stuff. He corrected me back in 83 when I F trooped upon something rather important which I did not take seriously.

I was an E2. he also taught us all how to kill clean and cook chickens in the field. Something I had never learned having not gown up on a farm.He also noticed I was having a problem out in the field and asked me what was wrong... I'd been eating C rations or Maybe it was meals rejected by everyone... Any way he got the drift and gave me a huge can of applesauce which solved my problem. He was a wise old soldier. We were lucky to have him. We also had several Vietnam combat Vets. They were our cooks. Not only did they do a great job, they knew all about the .50 cal and they were experts with it. Just having a couple guys like that in your unit at that time was like gold.

They knew what the deal was and back then we didnt know. It was not popular to be in the guard back then.

There were'nt many left in the 1980's. And the first sergeant was the only one who had been in all 3 wars up to that time.. Our Co was a grunt in Vietnam too. Now there are a bunch of vets with combat experience in the military and the guard and reserves. Back then not so many.

Those guys were priceless for their experience and knowledge and wisdom..

Sending you a PM.

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