Jump to content

Tell me about this soldiers' image ....


Recommended Posts

I'll always pick up a cool old photo when I see one. This one shows a WW1 era soldier with some interesting uniform detail.  He appears to be very smartly dressed.

First off, is he a ' Cook Sergeant '? What is the meaning of the chevron's & star on his left lower sleeve? And his collar ..one US pinback, no collar disks? And his hat...no eagle on the peek?  Or is this a pre-WW1 image? There is a name written on back - Virgil Rodgers.

Thanks for looking!

Kim

 

IMG_20200711_161303952~2.jpg

IMG_20200711_161324831~2.jpg

IMG_20200711_161407460~2.jpg

IMG_20200711_161446882~2.jpg

IMG_20200711_161512827.jpg

A member of this fine site since December 16, 2006....Member # 60

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif
donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif


 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Often when you see the combination of putters and visor hat being worn, it’s an indication that the image is from the early 1920s.

 

The star above the chevrons is probably  a voluntary enlistment star.

donation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

 

 

Always interested in the 166th Infantry, 42nd Division, A.E.F.

Quality WW1 studio portraits and real photo postcards of Distinguished Service Cross recipients; showing steel helmets; or other interesting content.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always been told that the star above the o/seas chevrons denoted one of the first 50,000 to go overseas. They sure are not common!

 

As for the officer's US device on the collar, you will note that this cook sergeant has his OD wool shirt collar turned out over his standing collar. As the tunic buttons appear to be gilt and not bronze, I would agree, this photo is probably from the 1920's.

 

Allan

Never under-estimate the power of prayer.

 

donation2007.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

The chevron is for a mess sergeant authorized 1918-1920. The star above the overseas chevrons could be either for volunteer or early overseas as stated above.

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gif

donation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gif

 


Never lose sight of the fact that the most important yardstick of your success will be how you treat other people - your family, friends, and coworkers, and even strangers you meet along the way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone for their input. I didn't pick up on the fact that he had his long sleeve wool shirt on underneath with the collar out. Must have been a winter photo considering his apparel. Interesting about the star as well. I agree as well that the image screams out as post-1920.

I just now noticed he's got a ribbon on his left breast pocket. Probably WW1 Victory ribbon?

I may repost his image and name in the ID section in hopes of finding out a bit more about Mr Rodgers service.

I love the image!

Kim

 

A member of this fine site since December 16, 2006....Member # 60

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif
donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif


 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.